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Protease activity, localization and inhibition in the human hair follicle.

Bhogal RK, Mouser PE, Higgins CA, Turner GA - Int J Cosmet Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, we demonstrated that this combination is capable of increasing the force required to remove hair in an ex vivo skin model system.These studies indicate the presence of proteolytic activity in the tissue surrounding the human hair club root and show that it is possible to inhibit this activity with a combination of Trichogen and climbazole.This technology may have potential to reduce excessive hair shedding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unilever R&D Colworth, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire, MK44 1LQ, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Inhibition of trypsin activity by climbazole, Trichogen® and a combination of Trichogen® + climbazole.
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fig03: Inhibition of trypsin activity by climbazole, Trichogen® and a combination of Trichogen® + climbazole.

Mentions: The effect of Trichogen®, climbazole and a combination of Trichogen®+climbazole was investigated for their ability to inhibit serine-like protease activity in root extracts using trypsin as the model serine protease. Climbazole (0.05%) alone had no effect on trypsin activity (Fig.3). Trichogen® alone at all concentrations tested and in combination with climbazole (0.05%) was capable of inhibiting trypsin activity. Both Trichogen® and Trichogen®+climbazole demonstrated a statistically significant inhibition in trypsin activity. The effect of combining climbazole with Trichogen® resulted in a greater inhibition of protease activity compared with Trichogen® alone and greater still compared with climbazole alone, which showed no inhibitory activity. These data suggest that combining Trichogen® with climbazole results in a synergistic protease inhibition effect.


Protease activity, localization and inhibition in the human hair follicle.

Bhogal RK, Mouser PE, Higgins CA, Turner GA - Int J Cosmet Sci (2013)

Inhibition of trypsin activity by climbazole, Trichogen® and a combination of Trichogen® + climbazole.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265249&req=5

fig03: Inhibition of trypsin activity by climbazole, Trichogen® and a combination of Trichogen® + climbazole.
Mentions: The effect of Trichogen®, climbazole and a combination of Trichogen®+climbazole was investigated for their ability to inhibit serine-like protease activity in root extracts using trypsin as the model serine protease. Climbazole (0.05%) alone had no effect on trypsin activity (Fig.3). Trichogen® alone at all concentrations tested and in combination with climbazole (0.05%) was capable of inhibiting trypsin activity. Both Trichogen® and Trichogen®+climbazole demonstrated a statistically significant inhibition in trypsin activity. The effect of combining climbazole with Trichogen® resulted in a greater inhibition of protease activity compared with Trichogen® alone and greater still compared with climbazole alone, which showed no inhibitory activity. These data suggest that combining Trichogen® with climbazole results in a synergistic protease inhibition effect.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, we demonstrated that this combination is capable of increasing the force required to remove hair in an ex vivo skin model system.These studies indicate the presence of proteolytic activity in the tissue surrounding the human hair club root and show that it is possible to inhibit this activity with a combination of Trichogen and climbazole.This technology may have potential to reduce excessive hair shedding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unilever R&D Colworth, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire, MK44 1LQ, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus