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Protease activity, localization and inhibition in the human hair follicle.

Bhogal RK, Mouser PE, Higgins CA, Turner GA - Int J Cosmet Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, we demonstrated that this combination is capable of increasing the force required to remove hair in an ex vivo skin model system.These studies indicate the presence of proteolytic activity in the tissue surrounding the human hair club root and show that it is possible to inhibit this activity with a combination of Trichogen and climbazole.This technology may have potential to reduce excessive hair shedding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unilever R&D Colworth, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire, MK44 1LQ, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Protease activity detected in material surrounding club root extracts and clipped hairs. Relative fluorescence units (RFU) were determined to be proportional to protease activity. Higher protease activity was found in material surrounding club root extracts compared with hair fibres.
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fig01: Protease activity detected in material surrounding club root extracts and clipped hairs. Relative fluorescence units (RFU) were determined to be proportional to protease activity. Higher protease activity was found in material surrounding club root extracts compared with hair fibres.

Mentions: To ensure sufficient protein yield for subsequent protease activity assessment, clipped roots from subjects were pooled for protein extraction. Respective control clipped hairs were also pooled in a similar manner. Exogen has been postulated to be regulated by a combination of proteases rather than a specific enzyme 3, and the root and hair extracts were likely to contain more than one protease. The data demonstrate the presence of metallo-, serine or sulfhydryl-like protease activity in root extracts (Fig.1). The relative activity observed in club root extracts was approximately 5× greater than that detected in hair fibres distal to the root. This suggests that the material surrounding the root contains enhanced protease activity. Whether these proteases play a role in the detachment of the maturing club root either, preceding, during or at end of exogen remains to be established. Furthermore, the role of protease inhibitors also merits investigation because a balance of proteases and respective protease inhibitors may well be altered as the hair follicle progresses during the hair cycle and then into exogen until it is finally shed from the scalp.


Protease activity, localization and inhibition in the human hair follicle.

Bhogal RK, Mouser PE, Higgins CA, Turner GA - Int J Cosmet Sci (2013)

Protease activity detected in material surrounding club root extracts and clipped hairs. Relative fluorescence units (RFU) were determined to be proportional to protease activity. Higher protease activity was found in material surrounding club root extracts compared with hair fibres.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265249&req=5

fig01: Protease activity detected in material surrounding club root extracts and clipped hairs. Relative fluorescence units (RFU) were determined to be proportional to protease activity. Higher protease activity was found in material surrounding club root extracts compared with hair fibres.
Mentions: To ensure sufficient protein yield for subsequent protease activity assessment, clipped roots from subjects were pooled for protein extraction. Respective control clipped hairs were also pooled in a similar manner. Exogen has been postulated to be regulated by a combination of proteases rather than a specific enzyme 3, and the root and hair extracts were likely to contain more than one protease. The data demonstrate the presence of metallo-, serine or sulfhydryl-like protease activity in root extracts (Fig.1). The relative activity observed in club root extracts was approximately 5× greater than that detected in hair fibres distal to the root. This suggests that the material surrounding the root contains enhanced protease activity. Whether these proteases play a role in the detachment of the maturing club root either, preceding, during or at end of exogen remains to be established. Furthermore, the role of protease inhibitors also merits investigation because a balance of proteases and respective protease inhibitors may well be altered as the hair follicle progresses during the hair cycle and then into exogen until it is finally shed from the scalp.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, we demonstrated that this combination is capable of increasing the force required to remove hair in an ex vivo skin model system.These studies indicate the presence of proteolytic activity in the tissue surrounding the human hair club root and show that it is possible to inhibit this activity with a combination of Trichogen and climbazole.This technology may have potential to reduce excessive hair shedding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unilever R&D Colworth, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire, MK44 1LQ, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus