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Effects of two doses of glucose and a caffeine-glucose combination on cognitive performance and mood during multi-tasking.

Scholey A, Savage K, O'Neill BV, Owen L, Stough C, Priestley C, Wetherell M - Hum Psychopharmacol (2014)

Bottom Line: This study assessed the effects of two doses of glucose and a caffeine-glucose combination on mood and performance of an ecologically valid, computerised multi-tasking platform.The caffeine-glucose group had significantly better total multi-tasking scores than the placebo or 60 g glucose groups and were significantly faster at mental arithmetic tasks than either glucose drink group.There were no significant treatment effects on mood.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean ± standard error of mean blood glucose levels (top) and salivary caffeine levels (bottom). For blood glucose a, significantly different to all other drink conditions; b, significantly different from caffeine–glucose; c, significantly different from 60 g glucose and caffeine–glucose at same time point. For salivary caffeine levels ***p < 0.005 at same time point
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fig02: Mean ± standard error of mean blood glucose levels (top) and salivary caffeine levels (bottom). For blood glucose a, significantly different to all other drink conditions; b, significantly different from caffeine–glucose; c, significantly different from 60 g glucose and caffeine–glucose at same time point. For salivary caffeine levels ***p < 0.005 at same time point

Mentions: There was a significant time × condition interaction for blood glucose levels [F(6, 292) = 20.68, p < 0.001]. Blood glucose levels did not differ at baseline [F(3, 146) = 0.91, p = 0.438]. There were significant group differences at both at the 30-min (pre-task) [F(3, 146) = 25.48, p < 0.001] and 60-min (post-task) [F(3, 146) = 27.21, p < 0.001] time points. Pairwise comparisons revealed that all measures were significantly higher than placebo at both post-baseline time points (p < 0.005) and that the 25 g drink was associated with lower blood glucose levels than the caffeine–glucose drink at the pre-task measure (p = 0.038) and both the 60 g drink and the caffeine–glucose drink at the post-test measure (p < 0.005 in both cases). These data are plotted in Figure 2 (upper panel).


Effects of two doses of glucose and a caffeine-glucose combination on cognitive performance and mood during multi-tasking.

Scholey A, Savage K, O'Neill BV, Owen L, Stough C, Priestley C, Wetherell M - Hum Psychopharmacol (2014)

Mean ± standard error of mean blood glucose levels (top) and salivary caffeine levels (bottom). For blood glucose a, significantly different to all other drink conditions; b, significantly different from caffeine–glucose; c, significantly different from 60 g glucose and caffeine–glucose at same time point. For salivary caffeine levels ***p < 0.005 at same time point
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265209&req=5

fig02: Mean ± standard error of mean blood glucose levels (top) and salivary caffeine levels (bottom). For blood glucose a, significantly different to all other drink conditions; b, significantly different from caffeine–glucose; c, significantly different from 60 g glucose and caffeine–glucose at same time point. For salivary caffeine levels ***p < 0.005 at same time point
Mentions: There was a significant time × condition interaction for blood glucose levels [F(6, 292) = 20.68, p < 0.001]. Blood glucose levels did not differ at baseline [F(3, 146) = 0.91, p = 0.438]. There were significant group differences at both at the 30-min (pre-task) [F(3, 146) = 25.48, p < 0.001] and 60-min (post-task) [F(3, 146) = 27.21, p < 0.001] time points. Pairwise comparisons revealed that all measures were significantly higher than placebo at both post-baseline time points (p < 0.005) and that the 25 g drink was associated with lower blood glucose levels than the caffeine–glucose drink at the pre-task measure (p = 0.038) and both the 60 g drink and the caffeine–glucose drink at the post-test measure (p < 0.005 in both cases). These data are plotted in Figure 2 (upper panel).

Bottom Line: This study assessed the effects of two doses of glucose and a caffeine-glucose combination on mood and performance of an ecologically valid, computerised multi-tasking platform.The caffeine-glucose group had significantly better total multi-tasking scores than the placebo or 60 g glucose groups and were significantly faster at mental arithmetic tasks than either glucose drink group.There were no significant treatment effects on mood.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus