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Effects of two doses of glucose and a caffeine-glucose combination on cognitive performance and mood during multi-tasking.

Scholey A, Savage K, O'Neill BV, Owen L, Stough C, Priestley C, Wetherell M - Hum Psychopharmacol (2014)

Bottom Line: There were no significant treatment effects on mood.These data suggest that co-administration of glucose and caffeine allows greater allocation of attentional resources than placebo or glucose alone.At present, we cannot rule out the possibility that the effects are due to caffeine alone Future studies should aim at disentangling caffeine and glucose effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

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Mean ± standard error of mean blood glucose levels (top) and salivary caffeine levels (bottom). For blood glucose a, significantly different to all other drink conditions; b, significantly different from caffeine–glucose; c, significantly different from 60 g glucose and caffeine–glucose at same time point. For salivary caffeine levels ***p < 0.005 at same time point
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fig02: Mean ± standard error of mean blood glucose levels (top) and salivary caffeine levels (bottom). For blood glucose a, significantly different to all other drink conditions; b, significantly different from caffeine–glucose; c, significantly different from 60 g glucose and caffeine–glucose at same time point. For salivary caffeine levels ***p < 0.005 at same time point

Mentions: There was a significant time × condition interaction for blood glucose levels [F(6, 292) = 20.68, p < 0.001]. Blood glucose levels did not differ at baseline [F(3, 146) = 0.91, p = 0.438]. There were significant group differences at both at the 30-min (pre-task) [F(3, 146) = 25.48, p < 0.001] and 60-min (post-task) [F(3, 146) = 27.21, p < 0.001] time points. Pairwise comparisons revealed that all measures were significantly higher than placebo at both post-baseline time points (p < 0.005) and that the 25 g drink was associated with lower blood glucose levels than the caffeine–glucose drink at the pre-task measure (p = 0.038) and both the 60 g drink and the caffeine–glucose drink at the post-test measure (p < 0.005 in both cases). These data are plotted in Figure 2 (upper panel).


Effects of two doses of glucose and a caffeine-glucose combination on cognitive performance and mood during multi-tasking.

Scholey A, Savage K, O'Neill BV, Owen L, Stough C, Priestley C, Wetherell M - Hum Psychopharmacol (2014)

Mean ± standard error of mean blood glucose levels (top) and salivary caffeine levels (bottom). For blood glucose a, significantly different to all other drink conditions; b, significantly different from caffeine–glucose; c, significantly different from 60 g glucose and caffeine–glucose at same time point. For salivary caffeine levels ***p < 0.005 at same time point
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265209&req=5

fig02: Mean ± standard error of mean blood glucose levels (top) and salivary caffeine levels (bottom). For blood glucose a, significantly different to all other drink conditions; b, significantly different from caffeine–glucose; c, significantly different from 60 g glucose and caffeine–glucose at same time point. For salivary caffeine levels ***p < 0.005 at same time point
Mentions: There was a significant time × condition interaction for blood glucose levels [F(6, 292) = 20.68, p < 0.001]. Blood glucose levels did not differ at baseline [F(3, 146) = 0.91, p = 0.438]. There were significant group differences at both at the 30-min (pre-task) [F(3, 146) = 25.48, p < 0.001] and 60-min (post-task) [F(3, 146) = 27.21, p < 0.001] time points. Pairwise comparisons revealed that all measures were significantly higher than placebo at both post-baseline time points (p < 0.005) and that the 25 g drink was associated with lower blood glucose levels than the caffeine–glucose drink at the pre-task measure (p = 0.038) and both the 60 g drink and the caffeine–glucose drink at the post-test measure (p < 0.005 in both cases). These data are plotted in Figure 2 (upper panel).

Bottom Line: There were no significant treatment effects on mood.These data suggest that co-administration of glucose and caffeine allows greater allocation of attentional resources than placebo or glucose alone.At present, we cannot rule out the possibility that the effects are due to caffeine alone Future studies should aim at disentangling caffeine and glucose effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Show MeSH