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Adaptation to altitude affects the senescence response to chilling in the perennial plant Arabis alpina.

Wingler A, Juvany M, Cuthbert C, Munné-Bosch S - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Bottom Line: However, this senescence-inducing effect of sugars is abolished at cold temperature, where sugar accumulation is important for protection.At warm temperature, sucrose content was negatively correlated with chlorophyll content, and sucrose treatment induced leaf senescence.Interactions between sugar and phytohormones included a positive correlation between sucrose and jasmonic acid contents that may be involved in promoting the stress-dependent decline in chlorophyll.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom a.wingler@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between jasmonic acid (JA) content on day 92 and sucrose (A) or chlorophyll (B) in the leaves of A. alpina plants grown continuously at 20 °C (warm, grey) or transferred to 5 °C on day 63 (cold, white). Symbols represent individual plants; different accessions are represented by different symbols. (A) Overall correlation: r=0.520, P≤ 0.001; warm: r=367, P=0.004; cold: r=–0.071, P=0.551. (B) Overall correlation: r=–0.383, P≤0.001; warm: r=–0.013, P=0.926; cold: r=–0.098, P=0.406.
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Figure 9: Relationship between jasmonic acid (JA) content on day 92 and sucrose (A) or chlorophyll (B) in the leaves of A. alpina plants grown continuously at 20 °C (warm, grey) or transferred to 5 °C on day 63 (cold, white). Symbols represent individual plants; different accessions are represented by different symbols. (A) Overall correlation: r=0.520, P≤ 0.001; warm: r=367, P=0.004; cold: r=–0.071, P=0.551. (B) Overall correlation: r=–0.383, P≤0.001; warm: r=–0.013, P=0.926; cold: r=–0.098, P=0.406.

Mentions: Phytohormone contents were determined in the same samples as the sugar contents shown in Fig. 3. The contents of all phytohormones analysed (ABA, JA, SA, ACC, GA1, GA4, zeatin, ZR, 2iP, iPA, and IAA) are given in Supplementary Table S1. Although no major differences between the leaves of different age were found, chilling affected phytohormone contents. Content of the cytokinin zeatin (Fig. 6) was significantly higher in leaves of cold-grown than warm-grown plants of the accessions Galibier-1, Galibier-4, Lautaret-2, and Pic Blanc. Other cytokinins (ZR, 2iP, or iPA) were, however, not increased after cold treatment. IAA content (Fig. 7) was generally lower after cold treatment, and this effect was significant for the accessions Galiber-1, Galibier-4, Pic Blanc, and Ruillans-1. Overall (combining results for both temperatures), there was a highly significant negative correlation between IAA and zeatin contents (Supplementary Table S2). In the same accessions that contained less IAA after cold treatment, JA content was increased (Fig. 8). A negative correlation was found between IAA and JA, whereas there was a positive correlation between zeatin and JA for both temperature treatments combined (Supplementary Table S2). JA also correlated with sucrose content for both temperature treatments combined and when samples from warm-grown plants were treated separately, but not at cold temperature (Fig. 9A). Further, there was a statistically significant negative correlation between JA and chlorophyll contents, but only when both temperature treatments were combined (Fig. 9B). Other interesting relationships included a positive correlation between glucose and JA and between fructose and SA at warm temperature (Supplementary Table S2). Only few of the regression analyses between phytohormones and altitude of origin were statistically significant (Supplementary Table S3).


Adaptation to altitude affects the senescence response to chilling in the perennial plant Arabis alpina.

Wingler A, Juvany M, Cuthbert C, Munné-Bosch S - J. Exp. Bot. (2014)

Relationship between jasmonic acid (JA) content on day 92 and sucrose (A) or chlorophyll (B) in the leaves of A. alpina plants grown continuously at 20 °C (warm, grey) or transferred to 5 °C on day 63 (cold, white). Symbols represent individual plants; different accessions are represented by different symbols. (A) Overall correlation: r=0.520, P≤ 0.001; warm: r=367, P=0.004; cold: r=–0.071, P=0.551. (B) Overall correlation: r=–0.383, P≤0.001; warm: r=–0.013, P=0.926; cold: r=–0.098, P=0.406.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265169&req=5

Figure 9: Relationship between jasmonic acid (JA) content on day 92 and sucrose (A) or chlorophyll (B) in the leaves of A. alpina plants grown continuously at 20 °C (warm, grey) or transferred to 5 °C on day 63 (cold, white). Symbols represent individual plants; different accessions are represented by different symbols. (A) Overall correlation: r=0.520, P≤ 0.001; warm: r=367, P=0.004; cold: r=–0.071, P=0.551. (B) Overall correlation: r=–0.383, P≤0.001; warm: r=–0.013, P=0.926; cold: r=–0.098, P=0.406.
Mentions: Phytohormone contents were determined in the same samples as the sugar contents shown in Fig. 3. The contents of all phytohormones analysed (ABA, JA, SA, ACC, GA1, GA4, zeatin, ZR, 2iP, iPA, and IAA) are given in Supplementary Table S1. Although no major differences between the leaves of different age were found, chilling affected phytohormone contents. Content of the cytokinin zeatin (Fig. 6) was significantly higher in leaves of cold-grown than warm-grown plants of the accessions Galibier-1, Galibier-4, Lautaret-2, and Pic Blanc. Other cytokinins (ZR, 2iP, or iPA) were, however, not increased after cold treatment. IAA content (Fig. 7) was generally lower after cold treatment, and this effect was significant for the accessions Galiber-1, Galibier-4, Pic Blanc, and Ruillans-1. Overall (combining results for both temperatures), there was a highly significant negative correlation between IAA and zeatin contents (Supplementary Table S2). In the same accessions that contained less IAA after cold treatment, JA content was increased (Fig. 8). A negative correlation was found between IAA and JA, whereas there was a positive correlation between zeatin and JA for both temperature treatments combined (Supplementary Table S2). JA also correlated with sucrose content for both temperature treatments combined and when samples from warm-grown plants were treated separately, but not at cold temperature (Fig. 9A). Further, there was a statistically significant negative correlation between JA and chlorophyll contents, but only when both temperature treatments were combined (Fig. 9B). Other interesting relationships included a positive correlation between glucose and JA and between fructose and SA at warm temperature (Supplementary Table S2). Only few of the regression analyses between phytohormones and altitude of origin were statistically significant (Supplementary Table S3).

Bottom Line: However, this senescence-inducing effect of sugars is abolished at cold temperature, where sugar accumulation is important for protection.At warm temperature, sucrose content was negatively correlated with chlorophyll content, and sucrose treatment induced leaf senescence.Interactions between sugar and phytohormones included a positive correlation between sucrose and jasmonic acid contents that may be involved in promoting the stress-dependent decline in chlorophyll.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom a.wingler@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus