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How much information is needed to infer reticulate evolutionary histories?

Huber KT, Van Iersel L, Moulton V, Wu T - Syst. Biol. (2014)

Bottom Line: Namely, we show that even if we are given all of the subnetworks induced on all proper subsets of the leaves of some rooted phylogenetic network, we still do not have all of the information required to completely determine that network.This implies that even if all of the building blocks for some reticulate evolutionary history were to be taken as the input for any given network building method, the method might still output an incorrect history.We also discuss some potential consequences of this result for constructing phylogenetic networks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Computing Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK, and Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI), Amsterdam, Netherlands.

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i) The tree  on . ii) The rooted caterpillar .
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Figure 5: i) The tree on . ii) The rooted caterpillar .

Mentions: Step 1: We begin by replacing the star tree containing the root vertex of by a tree with leaf set that is a subtree of a certain tree which is defined as follows. Let be the set of all binary sequences with length at most . The tree is the rooted tree with vertex set and arc set consisting of all pairs for which is the maximal precursor of in . Note that the common precursor of is clearly the root of . In addition, since each sequence is the maximal precursor of exactly two sequences in if , and is not the maximal precursor of any sequence in if , it follows that is a binary phylogenetic tree on . We depict the tree in Figure 5(i).


How much information is needed to infer reticulate evolutionary histories?

Huber KT, Van Iersel L, Moulton V, Wu T - Syst. Biol. (2014)

i) The tree  on . ii) The rooted caterpillar .
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265143&req=5

Figure 5: i) The tree on . ii) The rooted caterpillar .
Mentions: Step 1: We begin by replacing the star tree containing the root vertex of by a tree with leaf set that is a subtree of a certain tree which is defined as follows. Let be the set of all binary sequences with length at most . The tree is the rooted tree with vertex set and arc set consisting of all pairs for which is the maximal precursor of in . Note that the common precursor of is clearly the root of . In addition, since each sequence is the maximal precursor of exactly two sequences in if , and is not the maximal precursor of any sequence in if , it follows that is a binary phylogenetic tree on . We depict the tree in Figure 5(i).

Bottom Line: Namely, we show that even if we are given all of the subnetworks induced on all proper subsets of the leaves of some rooted phylogenetic network, we still do not have all of the information required to completely determine that network.This implies that even if all of the building blocks for some reticulate evolutionary history were to be taken as the input for any given network building method, the method might still output an incorrect history.We also discuss some potential consequences of this result for constructing phylogenetic networks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Computing Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK, and Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI), Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Show MeSH