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An allometric scaling relationship in the brain of preterm infants.

Paul RA, Smyser CD, Rogers CE, English I, Wallendorf M, Alexopoulos D, Meyer EJ, Van Essen DC, Neil JJ, Inder TE - Ann Clin Transl Neurol (2014)

Bottom Line: Measures of cortical surface area and total cerebral volume demonstrated a power-law scaling relationship (α = 1.27).Term equivalent cortical surface area and total cerebral volume measures and scaling exponents were not related to outcome.These findings confirm a previously reported allometric scaling relationship in the preterm brain, and suggest that scaling is not a sensitive indicator of aberrant cortical maturation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine St. Louis, Missouri.

ABSTRACT
Allometry has been used to demonstrate a power-law scaling relationship in the brain of premature born infants. Forty-nine preterm infants underwent neonatal MRI scans and neurodevelopmental testing at age 2. Measures of cortical surface area and total cerebral volume demonstrated a power-law scaling relationship (α = 1.27). No associations were identified between these measures and investigated clinical variables. Term equivalent cortical surface area and total cerebral volume measures and scaling exponents were not related to outcome. These findings confirm a previously reported allometric scaling relationship in the preterm brain, and suggest that scaling is not a sensitive indicator of aberrant cortical maturation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Midthickness cortical segmentations and volumetric segmentations for an individual infant born at 26 weeks gestation scanned at (from left to right) 30, 34 and 38 weeks postmenstrual age. Each cortical segmentation was used to generate a three-dimensional fiducial surface. Volumetric segmentations were used to identify total volumes of cerebrospinal fluid (red), grey matter (green), white matter (blue), deep nuclear grey matter (yellow) and cerebellum (teal). Total cerebral volume was determined as the summation of grey, white and deep nuclear grey matter measures. (B) Plot demonstrating expansion of cortical surface area and total cerebral volume as a function of postmenstrual age at time of scan. Note the quadratic relationship for measures of cortical surface area and the linear relationship for measures of total cerebral volume. (C) Total cerebral volume plotted against cortical surface area on a log-log scale demonstrating a significant power–law scaling relationship with α = 1.27 (r = 0.98, P < 0.001).
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fig01: (A) Midthickness cortical segmentations and volumetric segmentations for an individual infant born at 26 weeks gestation scanned at (from left to right) 30, 34 and 38 weeks postmenstrual age. Each cortical segmentation was used to generate a three-dimensional fiducial surface. Volumetric segmentations were used to identify total volumes of cerebrospinal fluid (red), grey matter (green), white matter (blue), deep nuclear grey matter (yellow) and cerebellum (teal). Total cerebral volume was determined as the summation of grey, white and deep nuclear grey matter measures. (B) Plot demonstrating expansion of cortical surface area and total cerebral volume as a function of postmenstrual age at time of scan. Note the quadratic relationship for measures of cortical surface area and the linear relationship for measures of total cerebral volume. (C) Total cerebral volume plotted against cortical surface area on a log-log scale demonstrating a significant power–law scaling relationship with α = 1.27 (r = 0.98, P < 0.001).

Mentions: Volumetry was performed using the Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs) software package (http://www.picsl.upenn.edu/ANTS) followed by manual correction using ITK-Snap software tools.11,12 TCV was calculated for each scan by summing the volume of white, gray and deep nuclear gray matter. Semi-automated cortical segmentation was based on the LIGASE method13 followed by manual editing. Surface-based morphometry was also performed (for full methodological account see Hill, et al.13). CSA was calculated using the mid-thickness surface for both the left and right hemispheres and summing the values for each hemisphere (Fig. 1A). For each scan, both CSA and TCV were plotted against PMA at time of scan. In addition, log-transformed values of CSA and TCV were entered into a linear regression model and TCV was plotted against CSA on a log-log scale to determine a power–law scaling relationship.


An allometric scaling relationship in the brain of preterm infants.

Paul RA, Smyser CD, Rogers CE, English I, Wallendorf M, Alexopoulos D, Meyer EJ, Van Essen DC, Neil JJ, Inder TE - Ann Clin Transl Neurol (2014)

(A) Midthickness cortical segmentations and volumetric segmentations for an individual infant born at 26 weeks gestation scanned at (from left to right) 30, 34 and 38 weeks postmenstrual age. Each cortical segmentation was used to generate a three-dimensional fiducial surface. Volumetric segmentations were used to identify total volumes of cerebrospinal fluid (red), grey matter (green), white matter (blue), deep nuclear grey matter (yellow) and cerebellum (teal). Total cerebral volume was determined as the summation of grey, white and deep nuclear grey matter measures. (B) Plot demonstrating expansion of cortical surface area and total cerebral volume as a function of postmenstrual age at time of scan. Note the quadratic relationship for measures of cortical surface area and the linear relationship for measures of total cerebral volume. (C) Total cerebral volume plotted against cortical surface area on a log-log scale demonstrating a significant power–law scaling relationship with α = 1.27 (r = 0.98, P < 0.001).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4265065&req=5

fig01: (A) Midthickness cortical segmentations and volumetric segmentations for an individual infant born at 26 weeks gestation scanned at (from left to right) 30, 34 and 38 weeks postmenstrual age. Each cortical segmentation was used to generate a three-dimensional fiducial surface. Volumetric segmentations were used to identify total volumes of cerebrospinal fluid (red), grey matter (green), white matter (blue), deep nuclear grey matter (yellow) and cerebellum (teal). Total cerebral volume was determined as the summation of grey, white and deep nuclear grey matter measures. (B) Plot demonstrating expansion of cortical surface area and total cerebral volume as a function of postmenstrual age at time of scan. Note the quadratic relationship for measures of cortical surface area and the linear relationship for measures of total cerebral volume. (C) Total cerebral volume plotted against cortical surface area on a log-log scale demonstrating a significant power–law scaling relationship with α = 1.27 (r = 0.98, P < 0.001).
Mentions: Volumetry was performed using the Advanced Normalization Tools (ANTs) software package (http://www.picsl.upenn.edu/ANTS) followed by manual correction using ITK-Snap software tools.11,12 TCV was calculated for each scan by summing the volume of white, gray and deep nuclear gray matter. Semi-automated cortical segmentation was based on the LIGASE method13 followed by manual editing. Surface-based morphometry was also performed (for full methodological account see Hill, et al.13). CSA was calculated using the mid-thickness surface for both the left and right hemispheres and summing the values for each hemisphere (Fig. 1A). For each scan, both CSA and TCV were plotted against PMA at time of scan. In addition, log-transformed values of CSA and TCV were entered into a linear regression model and TCV was plotted against CSA on a log-log scale to determine a power–law scaling relationship.

Bottom Line: Measures of cortical surface area and total cerebral volume demonstrated a power-law scaling relationship (α = 1.27).Term equivalent cortical surface area and total cerebral volume measures and scaling exponents were not related to outcome.These findings confirm a previously reported allometric scaling relationship in the preterm brain, and suggest that scaling is not a sensitive indicator of aberrant cortical maturation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine St. Louis, Missouri.

ABSTRACT
Allometry has been used to demonstrate a power-law scaling relationship in the brain of premature born infants. Forty-nine preterm infants underwent neonatal MRI scans and neurodevelopmental testing at age 2. Measures of cortical surface area and total cerebral volume demonstrated a power-law scaling relationship (α = 1.27). No associations were identified between these measures and investigated clinical variables. Term equivalent cortical surface area and total cerebral volume measures and scaling exponents were not related to outcome. These findings confirm a previously reported allometric scaling relationship in the preterm brain, and suggest that scaling is not a sensitive indicator of aberrant cortical maturation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus