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Carryover effects and climatic conditions influence the postfledging survival of greater sage-grouse.

Blomberg EJ, Sedinger JS, Gibson D, Coates PS, Casazza ML - Ecol Evol (2014)

Bottom Line: We also found evidence for temperature and precipitation effects on monthly survival rates of both sexes.We found no relationships between individual body condition and temperature or precipitation, suggesting that carryover effects operated independently of background climatic variation.Conservation actions that focus on improving prefledging habitat for sage-grouse may have indirect benefits to survival during postfledging, due to carryover effects between the two life phases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Biology, University of Maine 5755 Nutting Hall, Room 210, Orono, Maine, 04469.

ABSTRACT
Prebreeding survival is an important life history component that affects both parental fitness and population persistence. In birds, prebreeding can be separated into pre- and postfledging periods; carryover effects from the prefledging period may influence postfledging survival. We investigated effects of body condition at fledging, and climatic variation, on postfledging survival of radio-marked greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Great Basin Desert of the western United States. We hypothesized that body condition would influence postfledging survival as a carryover effect from the prefledging period, and we predicted that climatic variation may mediate this carryover effect or, alternatively, would act directly on survival during the postfledging period. Individual body condition had a strong positive effect on postfledging survival of juvenile females, suggesting carryover effects from the prefledging period. Females in the upper 25th percentile of body condition scores had a postfledging survival probability more than twice that (Φ = 0.51 ± 0.06 SE) of females in the bottom 25th percentile (Φ = 0.21 ± 0.05 SE). A similar effect could not be detected for males. We also found evidence for temperature and precipitation effects on monthly survival rates of both sexes. After controlling for site-level variation, postfledging survival was nearly twice as great following the coolest and wettest growing season (Φ = 0.77 ± 0.05 SE) compared with the hottest and driest growing season (Φ = 0.39 ± 0.05 SE). We found no relationships between individual body condition and temperature or precipitation, suggesting that carryover effects operated independently of background climatic variation. The temperature and precipitation effects we observed likely produced a direct effect on mortality risk during the postfledging period. Conservation actions that focus on improving prefledging habitat for sage-grouse may have indirect benefits to survival during postfledging, due to carryover effects between the two life phases.

No MeSH data available.


A female greater sage-grouse broods her dependent prefledging young in eastern Nevada, USA. Sage-grouse young are precocial and depend on their mother for thermoregulation during the first three to 4 weeks following hatch while developing their postnatal plumage. Following fledging, young may remain socially aggregated with their mother and brood-mates, but are no longer dependent on parental care.
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fig01: A female greater sage-grouse broods her dependent prefledging young in eastern Nevada, USA. Sage-grouse young are precocial and depend on their mother for thermoregulation during the first three to 4 weeks following hatch while developing their postnatal plumage. Following fledging, young may remain socially aggregated with their mother and brood-mates, but are no longer dependent on parental care.

Mentions: We explored the effects of body condition (body mass corrected for structural size) and weather variables on postfledging survival of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus, hereafter sage-grouse; Fig.1), a species of conservation concern in western North America (Knick and Connelly 2011). In the arid and semiarid sagebrush (Artemesia spp.) ecosystems inhabited by sage-grouse, annual fluctuations in weather (e.g., temperature and precipitation) produce general climate patterns that are characterized by drought and nondrought periods (Miller et al. 2011). Sage-grouse vital rates respond negatively to drought conditions (Blomberg et al. 2012), and these relationships likely stem from the link between available moisture and seasonal food resources, particularly during the reproductive period (Blomberg et al. 2012, 2013c). Sage-grouse young are precocial (Schroeder et al. 1999), and females often move their flightless broods long distances (>5 km) between nesting habitats and summer brood-rearing areas (Atamian et al. 2010). Like most prefledging galliforms (Moss 1997), sage-grouse young depend on availability of invertebrates and herbaceous forbs to meet high nutritional demands associated with rapid growth (Klebenow and Gray 1968; Moss 1997; Hannon and Martin 2006), and their ability to acquire these food resources affects both their survival (Gregg and Crawford 2009; Casazza et al. 2011) and growth (Blomberg et al. 2013b). Given the wide range of conditions experienced by young sage-grouse and their high nutritional demands, the potential for prerecruitment carryover effects seems likely.


Carryover effects and climatic conditions influence the postfledging survival of greater sage-grouse.

Blomberg EJ, Sedinger JS, Gibson D, Coates PS, Casazza ML - Ecol Evol (2014)

A female greater sage-grouse broods her dependent prefledging young in eastern Nevada, USA. Sage-grouse young are precocial and depend on their mother for thermoregulation during the first three to 4 weeks following hatch while developing their postnatal plumage. Following fledging, young may remain socially aggregated with their mother and brood-mates, but are no longer dependent on parental care.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264898&req=5

fig01: A female greater sage-grouse broods her dependent prefledging young in eastern Nevada, USA. Sage-grouse young are precocial and depend on their mother for thermoregulation during the first three to 4 weeks following hatch while developing their postnatal plumage. Following fledging, young may remain socially aggregated with their mother and brood-mates, but are no longer dependent on parental care.
Mentions: We explored the effects of body condition (body mass corrected for structural size) and weather variables on postfledging survival of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus, hereafter sage-grouse; Fig.1), a species of conservation concern in western North America (Knick and Connelly 2011). In the arid and semiarid sagebrush (Artemesia spp.) ecosystems inhabited by sage-grouse, annual fluctuations in weather (e.g., temperature and precipitation) produce general climate patterns that are characterized by drought and nondrought periods (Miller et al. 2011). Sage-grouse vital rates respond negatively to drought conditions (Blomberg et al. 2012), and these relationships likely stem from the link between available moisture and seasonal food resources, particularly during the reproductive period (Blomberg et al. 2012, 2013c). Sage-grouse young are precocial (Schroeder et al. 1999), and females often move their flightless broods long distances (>5 km) between nesting habitats and summer brood-rearing areas (Atamian et al. 2010). Like most prefledging galliforms (Moss 1997), sage-grouse young depend on availability of invertebrates and herbaceous forbs to meet high nutritional demands associated with rapid growth (Klebenow and Gray 1968; Moss 1997; Hannon and Martin 2006), and their ability to acquire these food resources affects both their survival (Gregg and Crawford 2009; Casazza et al. 2011) and growth (Blomberg et al. 2013b). Given the wide range of conditions experienced by young sage-grouse and their high nutritional demands, the potential for prerecruitment carryover effects seems likely.

Bottom Line: We also found evidence for temperature and precipitation effects on monthly survival rates of both sexes.We found no relationships between individual body condition and temperature or precipitation, suggesting that carryover effects operated independently of background climatic variation.Conservation actions that focus on improving prefledging habitat for sage-grouse may have indirect benefits to survival during postfledging, due to carryover effects between the two life phases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Biology, University of Maine 5755 Nutting Hall, Room 210, Orono, Maine, 04469.

ABSTRACT
Prebreeding survival is an important life history component that affects both parental fitness and population persistence. In birds, prebreeding can be separated into pre- and postfledging periods; carryover effects from the prefledging period may influence postfledging survival. We investigated effects of body condition at fledging, and climatic variation, on postfledging survival of radio-marked greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Great Basin Desert of the western United States. We hypothesized that body condition would influence postfledging survival as a carryover effect from the prefledging period, and we predicted that climatic variation may mediate this carryover effect or, alternatively, would act directly on survival during the postfledging period. Individual body condition had a strong positive effect on postfledging survival of juvenile females, suggesting carryover effects from the prefledging period. Females in the upper 25th percentile of body condition scores had a postfledging survival probability more than twice that (Φ = 0.51 ± 0.06 SE) of females in the bottom 25th percentile (Φ = 0.21 ± 0.05 SE). A similar effect could not be detected for males. We also found evidence for temperature and precipitation effects on monthly survival rates of both sexes. After controlling for site-level variation, postfledging survival was nearly twice as great following the coolest and wettest growing season (Φ = 0.77 ± 0.05 SE) compared with the hottest and driest growing season (Φ = 0.39 ± 0.05 SE). We found no relationships between individual body condition and temperature or precipitation, suggesting that carryover effects operated independently of background climatic variation. The temperature and precipitation effects we observed likely produced a direct effect on mortality risk during the postfledging period. Conservation actions that focus on improving prefledging habitat for sage-grouse may have indirect benefits to survival during postfledging, due to carryover effects between the two life phases.

No MeSH data available.