Limits...
Mutual stabilization of rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement.

Miyata K, Kudo K - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Previous studies have reported that spatiotemporal stability in rhythmic movement increases when coordinated with a rhythmic auditory stimulus or other effector in a stable coordination pattern.Therefore, the present study conducted two experiments to investigate (1) whether there is a stable coordination pattern between vocalization and whole-body movement and (2) whether a stable coordination pattern reduces variability in whole-body movement and vocalization.Overall, the present study revealed mutual stabilization between rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement via coordination within a stable pattern, suggesting that coupled action systems can act as a single functional unit or coordinative structure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The current study investigated the rhythmic coordination between vocalization and whole-body movement. Previous studies have reported that spatiotemporal stability in rhythmic movement increases when coordinated with a rhythmic auditory stimulus or other effector in a stable coordination pattern. Therefore, the present study conducted two experiments to investigate (1) whether there is a stable coordination pattern between vocalization and whole-body movement and (2) whether a stable coordination pattern reduces variability in whole-body movement and vocalization. In Experiment 1, two coordination patterns between vocalizations and whole-body movement (hip, knee, and ankle joint flexion-on-the-voice vs. joint extension-on-the-voice) in a standing posture were explored at movement frequencies of 80, 130, and 180 beats per minute. At higher movement frequencies, the phase angle in the extension-on-the-voice condition deviated from the intended phase angle. However, the angle of the flexion-on-the-voice was maintained even when movement frequency increased. These results suggest that there was a stable coordination pattern in the flexion-on-the-voice condition. In Experiment 2, variability in whole-body movement and voice-onset intervals was compared between two conditions: one related to tasks performed in the flexion-on-the-voice coordination (coordination condition) that was a stable coordination pattern, and the other related to tasks performed independently (control condition). The results showed that variability in whole-body movement and voice-onset intervals was smaller in the coordination condition than in the control condition. Overall, the present study revealed mutual stabilization between rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement via coordination within a stable pattern, suggesting that coupled action systems can act as a single functional unit or coordinative structure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Typical examples of the phase angle of voice time for one participant.The value at the top of each trajectory is the average voice frequency in each trial. In the extension-on-the-voice condition (B), the replacement of joint extension on the voice by joint flexion on the voice occurred at 180 bpm. This replacement did not occur in the flexion-on-the-voice condition.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264888&req=5

pone-0115495-g004: Typical examples of the phase angle of voice time for one participant.The value at the top of each trajectory is the average voice frequency in each trial. In the extension-on-the-voice condition (B), the replacement of joint extension on the voice by joint flexion on the voice occurred at 180 bpm. This replacement did not occur in the flexion-on-the-voice condition.

Mentions: Fig. 4 shows typical examples of the phase plane trajectories and vocal onsets for one participant. In the flexion-on-the-voice condition, participants performed this task successfully for all movement frequencies (Fig. 4-A). In contrast, in the extension-on-the-voice condition, replacement of knee extension on the voice by knee flexion on the voice occurred at a movement frequency of 180 bpm (Fig. 4-B).


Mutual stabilization of rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement.

Miyata K, Kudo K - PLoS ONE (2014)

Typical examples of the phase angle of voice time for one participant.The value at the top of each trajectory is the average voice frequency in each trial. In the extension-on-the-voice condition (B), the replacement of joint extension on the voice by joint flexion on the voice occurred at 180 bpm. This replacement did not occur in the flexion-on-the-voice condition.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264888&req=5

pone-0115495-g004: Typical examples of the phase angle of voice time for one participant.The value at the top of each trajectory is the average voice frequency in each trial. In the extension-on-the-voice condition (B), the replacement of joint extension on the voice by joint flexion on the voice occurred at 180 bpm. This replacement did not occur in the flexion-on-the-voice condition.
Mentions: Fig. 4 shows typical examples of the phase plane trajectories and vocal onsets for one participant. In the flexion-on-the-voice condition, participants performed this task successfully for all movement frequencies (Fig. 4-A). In contrast, in the extension-on-the-voice condition, replacement of knee extension on the voice by knee flexion on the voice occurred at a movement frequency of 180 bpm (Fig. 4-B).

Bottom Line: Previous studies have reported that spatiotemporal stability in rhythmic movement increases when coordinated with a rhythmic auditory stimulus or other effector in a stable coordination pattern.Therefore, the present study conducted two experiments to investigate (1) whether there is a stable coordination pattern between vocalization and whole-body movement and (2) whether a stable coordination pattern reduces variability in whole-body movement and vocalization.Overall, the present study revealed mutual stabilization between rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement via coordination within a stable pattern, suggesting that coupled action systems can act as a single functional unit or coordinative structure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The current study investigated the rhythmic coordination between vocalization and whole-body movement. Previous studies have reported that spatiotemporal stability in rhythmic movement increases when coordinated with a rhythmic auditory stimulus or other effector in a stable coordination pattern. Therefore, the present study conducted two experiments to investigate (1) whether there is a stable coordination pattern between vocalization and whole-body movement and (2) whether a stable coordination pattern reduces variability in whole-body movement and vocalization. In Experiment 1, two coordination patterns between vocalizations and whole-body movement (hip, knee, and ankle joint flexion-on-the-voice vs. joint extension-on-the-voice) in a standing posture were explored at movement frequencies of 80, 130, and 180 beats per minute. At higher movement frequencies, the phase angle in the extension-on-the-voice condition deviated from the intended phase angle. However, the angle of the flexion-on-the-voice was maintained even when movement frequency increased. These results suggest that there was a stable coordination pattern in the flexion-on-the-voice condition. In Experiment 2, variability in whole-body movement and voice-onset intervals was compared between two conditions: one related to tasks performed in the flexion-on-the-voice coordination (coordination condition) that was a stable coordination pattern, and the other related to tasks performed independently (control condition). The results showed that variability in whole-body movement and voice-onset intervals was smaller in the coordination condition than in the control condition. Overall, the present study revealed mutual stabilization between rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement via coordination within a stable pattern, suggesting that coupled action systems can act as a single functional unit or coordinative structure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus