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Mutual stabilization of rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement.

Miyata K, Kudo K - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Previous studies have reported that spatiotemporal stability in rhythmic movement increases when coordinated with a rhythmic auditory stimulus or other effector in a stable coordination pattern.Therefore, the present study conducted two experiments to investigate (1) whether there is a stable coordination pattern between vocalization and whole-body movement and (2) whether a stable coordination pattern reduces variability in whole-body movement and vocalization.Overall, the present study revealed mutual stabilization between rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement via coordination within a stable pattern, suggesting that coupled action systems can act as a single functional unit or coordinative structure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The current study investigated the rhythmic coordination between vocalization and whole-body movement. Previous studies have reported that spatiotemporal stability in rhythmic movement increases when coordinated with a rhythmic auditory stimulus or other effector in a stable coordination pattern. Therefore, the present study conducted two experiments to investigate (1) whether there is a stable coordination pattern between vocalization and whole-body movement and (2) whether a stable coordination pattern reduces variability in whole-body movement and vocalization. In Experiment 1, two coordination patterns between vocalizations and whole-body movement (hip, knee, and ankle joint flexion-on-the-voice vs. joint extension-on-the-voice) in a standing posture were explored at movement frequencies of 80, 130, and 180 beats per minute. At higher movement frequencies, the phase angle in the extension-on-the-voice condition deviated from the intended phase angle. However, the angle of the flexion-on-the-voice was maintained even when movement frequency increased. These results suggest that there was a stable coordination pattern in the flexion-on-the-voice condition. In Experiment 2, variability in whole-body movement and voice-onset intervals was compared between two conditions: one related to tasks performed in the flexion-on-the-voice coordination (coordination condition) that was a stable coordination pattern, and the other related to tasks performed independently (control condition). The results showed that variability in whole-body movement and voice-onset intervals was smaller in the coordination condition than in the control condition. Overall, the present study revealed mutual stabilization between rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement via coordination within a stable pattern, suggesting that coupled action systems can act as a single functional unit or coordinative structure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean voice frequency (A) and SD of voice frequency (B).Vertical bars represent between-subjects standard deviations.
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pone-0115495-g003: Mean voice frequency (A) and SD of voice frequency (B).Vertical bars represent between-subjects standard deviations.

Mentions: Voice frequency mean and SD were measured in order to determine whether participants performed tasks at the appropriate frequency. Fig. 3-A shows mean voice frequency. A two-way ANOVA revealed a significant main effect of movement frequency, F (2, 26) = 2862.1, p<.001, but the main effect of coordination pattern was not significant, F (1, 13) = .39, p = .54. The two-way interaction was also not significant, F (2, 26) = .92, p = .41. The mean voice frequency was approximately the same for the specified voice frequency and was not significantly different between the flexion-on-the-voice and extension-on-the-voice conditions.


Mutual stabilization of rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement.

Miyata K, Kudo K - PLoS ONE (2014)

Mean voice frequency (A) and SD of voice frequency (B).Vertical bars represent between-subjects standard deviations.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264888&req=5

pone-0115495-g003: Mean voice frequency (A) and SD of voice frequency (B).Vertical bars represent between-subjects standard deviations.
Mentions: Voice frequency mean and SD were measured in order to determine whether participants performed tasks at the appropriate frequency. Fig. 3-A shows mean voice frequency. A two-way ANOVA revealed a significant main effect of movement frequency, F (2, 26) = 2862.1, p<.001, but the main effect of coordination pattern was not significant, F (1, 13) = .39, p = .54. The two-way interaction was also not significant, F (2, 26) = .92, p = .41. The mean voice frequency was approximately the same for the specified voice frequency and was not significantly different between the flexion-on-the-voice and extension-on-the-voice conditions.

Bottom Line: Previous studies have reported that spatiotemporal stability in rhythmic movement increases when coordinated with a rhythmic auditory stimulus or other effector in a stable coordination pattern.Therefore, the present study conducted two experiments to investigate (1) whether there is a stable coordination pattern between vocalization and whole-body movement and (2) whether a stable coordination pattern reduces variability in whole-body movement and vocalization.Overall, the present study revealed mutual stabilization between rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement via coordination within a stable pattern, suggesting that coupled action systems can act as a single functional unit or coordinative structure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The current study investigated the rhythmic coordination between vocalization and whole-body movement. Previous studies have reported that spatiotemporal stability in rhythmic movement increases when coordinated with a rhythmic auditory stimulus or other effector in a stable coordination pattern. Therefore, the present study conducted two experiments to investigate (1) whether there is a stable coordination pattern between vocalization and whole-body movement and (2) whether a stable coordination pattern reduces variability in whole-body movement and vocalization. In Experiment 1, two coordination patterns between vocalizations and whole-body movement (hip, knee, and ankle joint flexion-on-the-voice vs. joint extension-on-the-voice) in a standing posture were explored at movement frequencies of 80, 130, and 180 beats per minute. At higher movement frequencies, the phase angle in the extension-on-the-voice condition deviated from the intended phase angle. However, the angle of the flexion-on-the-voice was maintained even when movement frequency increased. These results suggest that there was a stable coordination pattern in the flexion-on-the-voice condition. In Experiment 2, variability in whole-body movement and voice-onset intervals was compared between two conditions: one related to tasks performed in the flexion-on-the-voice coordination (coordination condition) that was a stable coordination pattern, and the other related to tasks performed independently (control condition). The results showed that variability in whole-body movement and voice-onset intervals was smaller in the coordination condition than in the control condition. Overall, the present study revealed mutual stabilization between rhythmic vocalization and whole-body movement via coordination within a stable pattern, suggesting that coupled action systems can act as a single functional unit or coordinative structure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus