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Coincidence between geographical distribution of Leptotrombidium scutellare and scrub typhus incidence in South Korea.

Roh JY, Song BG, Park WI, Shin EH, Park C, Park MY, Chang KS, Lee WG, Lee HI, Shin EH - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: In autumn, the ratio of L. scutellare increased to 42% while the ratio of L. pallidum decreased.Distribution mapping analysis shows an identical geographical distribution of L. scutellare and epidemic incidence of scrub typhus in South Korea.L. pallidum could be another vector at all other parts of the Korean peninsula, including the eastern and northern regions that have a low level of scrub typhus incidence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Medical Entomology, Center for Immunology and Pathology, Korea National Institute of Health, Cheongju, Korea.

ABSTRACT
To clarify the geographical distribution of scrub typhus vectors in Korea, a survey of larval trombiculid mites was conducted from 2005 to 2007 by collecting wild small mammals twice a year (spring and autumn) at 24 sites nationwide. A total of 67,325 mites representing 4 genera and 14 species were collected from 783 trapped rodents, corresponding to a chigger index (number of chigger mites per rodent) of 86.0. The predominant mite species were Leptotrombidium pallidum (52.6%), Leptotrombiduim scutellare (27.1%), Leptotrombidium palpale (8.2%), Leptotrombidium orientale (5.6%), and Neotrombicula tamiyai (1.7%). However, the proportions of L. scutellare in southern areas, including endemic provinces such as Jeollabuk-Do (34.3%), Jeollanam-Do (49.0%), and Gyeongsangnam-Do (88%), were relatively higher than in central Korean regions where L. pallidum was predominant. In autumn, the ratio of L. scutellare increased to 42% while the ratio of L. pallidum decreased. The geographical distribution map of the L. scutellare chigger index was identical to the incidence pattern of scrub typhus, whereas those of overall mites and L. pallidum showed no relationship with case incidence patterns. Distribution mapping analysis shows an identical geographical distribution of L. scutellare and epidemic incidence of scrub typhus in South Korea. L. pallidum could be another vector at all other parts of the Korean peninsula, including the eastern and northern regions that have a low level of scrub typhus incidence.

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Scrub typhus incidence in 2007 (A), and average monthly number of patients with scrub typhus (B) from 2001 to 2010.The figure is generated using data from the National Notifiable Disease Web Statistics System (NNDWSS) of the KCDC. Percentage (%) indicates monthly incidence rate.
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pone-0113193-g002: Scrub typhus incidence in 2007 (A), and average monthly number of patients with scrub typhus (B) from 2001 to 2010.The figure is generated using data from the National Notifiable Disease Web Statistics System (NNDWSS) of the KCDC. Percentage (%) indicates monthly incidence rate.

Mentions: To compare the geographical distribution of vectors, distribution maps were drawn by interpolation using the IDW (Inverse Distance Weighted) technique among Spatial Analyst Tools in ArcGIS 9.0 (2004. Environmental Research Systems Institute, Redlands, CA, USA). Information about patients in South Korea diagnosed with scrub typhus in 2007 was obtained from the National Notifiable Disease Web Statistics System (NNDWSS) of the KCDC (Fig. 2A). Scrub typhus was diagnosed by indirect immune-fluorescent assay and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by regional Institutes of Health and Environment and hospitals and reported to the NNDWSS of the KCDC.


Coincidence between geographical distribution of Leptotrombidium scutellare and scrub typhus incidence in South Korea.

Roh JY, Song BG, Park WI, Shin EH, Park C, Park MY, Chang KS, Lee WG, Lee HI, Shin EH - PLoS ONE (2014)

Scrub typhus incidence in 2007 (A), and average monthly number of patients with scrub typhus (B) from 2001 to 2010.The figure is generated using data from the National Notifiable Disease Web Statistics System (NNDWSS) of the KCDC. Percentage (%) indicates monthly incidence rate.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264734&req=5

pone-0113193-g002: Scrub typhus incidence in 2007 (A), and average monthly number of patients with scrub typhus (B) from 2001 to 2010.The figure is generated using data from the National Notifiable Disease Web Statistics System (NNDWSS) of the KCDC. Percentage (%) indicates monthly incidence rate.
Mentions: To compare the geographical distribution of vectors, distribution maps were drawn by interpolation using the IDW (Inverse Distance Weighted) technique among Spatial Analyst Tools in ArcGIS 9.0 (2004. Environmental Research Systems Institute, Redlands, CA, USA). Information about patients in South Korea diagnosed with scrub typhus in 2007 was obtained from the National Notifiable Disease Web Statistics System (NNDWSS) of the KCDC (Fig. 2A). Scrub typhus was diagnosed by indirect immune-fluorescent assay and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by regional Institutes of Health and Environment and hospitals and reported to the NNDWSS of the KCDC.

Bottom Line: In autumn, the ratio of L. scutellare increased to 42% while the ratio of L. pallidum decreased.Distribution mapping analysis shows an identical geographical distribution of L. scutellare and epidemic incidence of scrub typhus in South Korea.L. pallidum could be another vector at all other parts of the Korean peninsula, including the eastern and northern regions that have a low level of scrub typhus incidence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Medical Entomology, Center for Immunology and Pathology, Korea National Institute of Health, Cheongju, Korea.

ABSTRACT
To clarify the geographical distribution of scrub typhus vectors in Korea, a survey of larval trombiculid mites was conducted from 2005 to 2007 by collecting wild small mammals twice a year (spring and autumn) at 24 sites nationwide. A total of 67,325 mites representing 4 genera and 14 species were collected from 783 trapped rodents, corresponding to a chigger index (number of chigger mites per rodent) of 86.0. The predominant mite species were Leptotrombidium pallidum (52.6%), Leptotrombiduim scutellare (27.1%), Leptotrombidium palpale (8.2%), Leptotrombidium orientale (5.6%), and Neotrombicula tamiyai (1.7%). However, the proportions of L. scutellare in southern areas, including endemic provinces such as Jeollabuk-Do (34.3%), Jeollanam-Do (49.0%), and Gyeongsangnam-Do (88%), were relatively higher than in central Korean regions where L. pallidum was predominant. In autumn, the ratio of L. scutellare increased to 42% while the ratio of L. pallidum decreased. The geographical distribution map of the L. scutellare chigger index was identical to the incidence pattern of scrub typhus, whereas those of overall mites and L. pallidum showed no relationship with case incidence patterns. Distribution mapping analysis shows an identical geographical distribution of L. scutellare and epidemic incidence of scrub typhus in South Korea. L. pallidum could be another vector at all other parts of the Korean peninsula, including the eastern and northern regions that have a low level of scrub typhus incidence.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus