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Tea and coffee consumption and risk of laryngeal cancer: a systematic review meta-analysis.

Chen J, Long S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: A meta-analysis was obtained to combine study-specific RRs with a random-effects model.The overall analysis of all 10 studies, including the case-control and cohort studies, found that tea drinking was not associated with laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.03; 95% CI: 0.66-1.61).However, coffee consumption was significantly associated with the laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.03-2.11).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, Central South University Affiliated The Third Xiangya Hospital, Changsha, Hunan, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Tea and coffee are the most commonly consumed beverages in the worldwide. The relationship between tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer was still unclear.

Methods: Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic database (Medline and EMBASE) and reviewing the reference lists of relevant articles until Oct. 2013. Observational studies that reported RRs and 95% CIs for the link of tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer were eligible. A meta-analysis was obtained to combine study-specific RRs with a random-effects model.

Results: A total of 2,803 cases and 503,234 controls in 10 independent studies were identified. The overall analysis of all 10 studies, including the case-control and cohort studies, found that tea drinking was not associated with laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.03; 95% CI: 0.66-1.61). However, coffee consumption was significantly associated with the laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.03-2.11). A dose-response relationship between coffee intake and laryngeal carcinoma was detected; however, no evidence of dose-response link between tea consumption and laryngeal carcinoma risk was detected.

Conclusions: The results from this meta-analysis of observational studies demonstrate that coffee consumption would increase the laryngeal cancer risk, while tea intake was not associated with risk of laryngeal carcinoma.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plot: overall meta-analysis of coffee, tea or combined consumption and laryngeal cancer risk.A random-effects model was obtained. Squares indicated study-specific risk estimates (size of square reflects the study-statistical weight, i.e. inverse of variance); horizontal lines indicate 95% confidence intervals; diamond indicates summary relative risk estimate with its corresponding 95% confidence interval.
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pone-0112006-g002: Forest plot: overall meta-analysis of coffee, tea or combined consumption and laryngeal cancer risk.A random-effects model was obtained. Squares indicated study-specific risk estimates (size of square reflects the study-statistical weight, i.e. inverse of variance); horizontal lines indicate 95% confidence intervals; diamond indicates summary relative risk estimate with its corresponding 95% confidence interval.

Mentions: The overall analysis of all 10 studies, including the case-control and cohort studies, found that tea drinking was not associated with laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.03; 95% CI: 0.66–1.61). However, coffee consumption was significantly associated with the laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.03–2.11). When the relationship between tea and coffee consumption and risk of laryngeal carcinoma was considered, no significant association was detected in the meta-analysis (RR = 1.20; 95% CI = 0.92–1.56) nor the subgroup analyses (RR = 0.81; 95% CI = 0.55–1.20) (Fig. 2).


Tea and coffee consumption and risk of laryngeal cancer: a systematic review meta-analysis.

Chen J, Long S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Forest plot: overall meta-analysis of coffee, tea or combined consumption and laryngeal cancer risk.A random-effects model was obtained. Squares indicated study-specific risk estimates (size of square reflects the study-statistical weight, i.e. inverse of variance); horizontal lines indicate 95% confidence intervals; diamond indicates summary relative risk estimate with its corresponding 95% confidence interval.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264690&req=5

pone-0112006-g002: Forest plot: overall meta-analysis of coffee, tea or combined consumption and laryngeal cancer risk.A random-effects model was obtained. Squares indicated study-specific risk estimates (size of square reflects the study-statistical weight, i.e. inverse of variance); horizontal lines indicate 95% confidence intervals; diamond indicates summary relative risk estimate with its corresponding 95% confidence interval.
Mentions: The overall analysis of all 10 studies, including the case-control and cohort studies, found that tea drinking was not associated with laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.03; 95% CI: 0.66–1.61). However, coffee consumption was significantly associated with the laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.03–2.11). When the relationship between tea and coffee consumption and risk of laryngeal carcinoma was considered, no significant association was detected in the meta-analysis (RR = 1.20; 95% CI = 0.92–1.56) nor the subgroup analyses (RR = 0.81; 95% CI = 0.55–1.20) (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: A meta-analysis was obtained to combine study-specific RRs with a random-effects model.The overall analysis of all 10 studies, including the case-control and cohort studies, found that tea drinking was not associated with laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.03; 95% CI: 0.66-1.61).However, coffee consumption was significantly associated with the laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.03-2.11).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, Central South University Affiliated The Third Xiangya Hospital, Changsha, Hunan, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Tea and coffee are the most commonly consumed beverages in the worldwide. The relationship between tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer was still unclear.

Methods: Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic database (Medline and EMBASE) and reviewing the reference lists of relevant articles until Oct. 2013. Observational studies that reported RRs and 95% CIs for the link of tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer were eligible. A meta-analysis was obtained to combine study-specific RRs with a random-effects model.

Results: A total of 2,803 cases and 503,234 controls in 10 independent studies were identified. The overall analysis of all 10 studies, including the case-control and cohort studies, found that tea drinking was not associated with laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.03; 95% CI: 0.66-1.61). However, coffee consumption was significantly associated with the laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.03-2.11). A dose-response relationship between coffee intake and laryngeal carcinoma was detected; however, no evidence of dose-response link between tea consumption and laryngeal carcinoma risk was detected.

Conclusions: The results from this meta-analysis of observational studies demonstrate that coffee consumption would increase the laryngeal cancer risk, while tea intake was not associated with risk of laryngeal carcinoma.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus