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Tea and coffee consumption and risk of laryngeal cancer: a systematic review meta-analysis.

Chen J, Long S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: A meta-analysis was obtained to combine study-specific RRs with a random-effects model.The overall analysis of all 10 studies, including the case-control and cohort studies, found that tea drinking was not associated with laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.03; 95% CI: 0.66-1.61).However, coffee consumption was significantly associated with the laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.03-2.11).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, Central South University Affiliated The Third Xiangya Hospital, Changsha, Hunan, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Tea and coffee are the most commonly consumed beverages in the worldwide. The relationship between tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer was still unclear.

Methods: Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic database (Medline and EMBASE) and reviewing the reference lists of relevant articles until Oct. 2013. Observational studies that reported RRs and 95% CIs for the link of tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer were eligible. A meta-analysis was obtained to combine study-specific RRs with a random-effects model.

Results: A total of 2,803 cases and 503,234 controls in 10 independent studies were identified. The overall analysis of all 10 studies, including the case-control and cohort studies, found that tea drinking was not associated with laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.03; 95% CI: 0.66-1.61). However, coffee consumption was significantly associated with the laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.03-2.11). A dose-response relationship between coffee intake and laryngeal carcinoma was detected; however, no evidence of dose-response link between tea consumption and laryngeal carcinoma risk was detected.

Conclusions: The results from this meta-analysis of observational studies demonstrate that coffee consumption would increase the laryngeal cancer risk, while tea intake was not associated with risk of laryngeal carcinoma.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram of screened, excluded, and analysed publications.
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pone-0112006-g001: Flow diagram of screened, excluded, and analysed publications.

Mentions: The flowchart of the study selection was presented in Fig. 1. A total of 801 publications were retrieved from the initial literature search (329 form the Medline, 214 from the EMBASE, and 47 from the reference lists of the relevant studies). After excluding 127 duplicated articles, a total of 463 records were detailed evaluated. Among the 463 articles, 78 full-texts were assessed for eligibility after removing 385 articles (reviews, case reports and unrelated articles). From these, 10 original articles that included data on the association between tea and coffee consumption and laryngeal cancer were ultimately included in our meta-analysis [12]–[15], [19], [20], [24]–[27]. The 68 articles that excluded after reading the full text were the studies in which laryngeal carcinoma incidence not reported (n = 43) and tea and coffee intake not reported (n = 25).


Tea and coffee consumption and risk of laryngeal cancer: a systematic review meta-analysis.

Chen J, Long S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Flow diagram of screened, excluded, and analysed publications.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264690&req=5

pone-0112006-g001: Flow diagram of screened, excluded, and analysed publications.
Mentions: The flowchart of the study selection was presented in Fig. 1. A total of 801 publications were retrieved from the initial literature search (329 form the Medline, 214 from the EMBASE, and 47 from the reference lists of the relevant studies). After excluding 127 duplicated articles, a total of 463 records were detailed evaluated. Among the 463 articles, 78 full-texts were assessed for eligibility after removing 385 articles (reviews, case reports and unrelated articles). From these, 10 original articles that included data on the association between tea and coffee consumption and laryngeal cancer were ultimately included in our meta-analysis [12]–[15], [19], [20], [24]–[27]. The 68 articles that excluded after reading the full text were the studies in which laryngeal carcinoma incidence not reported (n = 43) and tea and coffee intake not reported (n = 25).

Bottom Line: A meta-analysis was obtained to combine study-specific RRs with a random-effects model.The overall analysis of all 10 studies, including the case-control and cohort studies, found that tea drinking was not associated with laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.03; 95% CI: 0.66-1.61).However, coffee consumption was significantly associated with the laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.03-2.11).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, Central South University Affiliated The Third Xiangya Hospital, Changsha, Hunan, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Tea and coffee are the most commonly consumed beverages in the worldwide. The relationship between tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer was still unclear.

Methods: Relevant studies were identified by searching electronic database (Medline and EMBASE) and reviewing the reference lists of relevant articles until Oct. 2013. Observational studies that reported RRs and 95% CIs for the link of tea and coffee consumption on the risk of laryngeal cancer were eligible. A meta-analysis was obtained to combine study-specific RRs with a random-effects model.

Results: A total of 2,803 cases and 503,234 controls in 10 independent studies were identified. The overall analysis of all 10 studies, including the case-control and cohort studies, found that tea drinking was not associated with laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.03; 95% CI: 0.66-1.61). However, coffee consumption was significantly associated with the laryngeal carcinoma (RR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.03-2.11). A dose-response relationship between coffee intake and laryngeal carcinoma was detected; however, no evidence of dose-response link between tea consumption and laryngeal carcinoma risk was detected.

Conclusions: The results from this meta-analysis of observational studies demonstrate that coffee consumption would increase the laryngeal cancer risk, while tea intake was not associated with risk of laryngeal carcinoma.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus