Limits...
Kissing bugs in the United States: risk for vector-borne disease in humans.

Klotz SA, Dorn PL, Mosbacher M, Schmidt JO - Environ Health Insights (2014)

Bottom Line: Eleven species of kissing bugs are found in the United States.Kissing bugs are capable of adapting to new habitats such as human domiciles; however, they do not colonize homes in the United States as in Central and South America.Where possible, descriptions of US species are compared to the epidemiologically important Latin American species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA.

ABSTRACT
Eleven species of kissing bugs are found in the United States. Their home ranges may be expanding northward, perhaps as a consequence of climate change. At least eight of the species, perhaps all, are reported to harbor Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Because humans are encroaching on kissing bug habitat, there is concern for vector-transmitted Chagas disease in the United States. To date, documented autochthonous cases of Chagas in humans in the United States are rare. Kissing bugs are capable of adapting to new habitats such as human domiciles; however, they do not colonize homes in the United States as in Central and South America. We review the biology, behavior, and medical importance of kissing bugs and the risk they pose for transmission of Chagas disease in the United States. Where possible, descriptions of US species are compared to the epidemiologically important Latin American species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Female Triatoma rubida, a common cause of anaphylaxis in Arizona. (Photograph by Justin Schmidt with permission.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264683&req=5

f2-ehi-suppl.2-2014-049: Female Triatoma rubida, a common cause of anaphylaxis in Arizona. (Photograph by Justin Schmidt with permission.)

Mentions: Kissing bug eggs hatch into wingless larvae, often called nymphs, of which there are five stages, each stage requiring at least one blood meal to molt. The fifth instar or nymph molts to a winged adult that, when given the opportunity, feeds every several weeks, or even more than once a week, depending upon ambient temperature and season of the year.9 When food is unavailable, or conditions unsuitable, T. infestans in South America can survive for 7 months without feeding. The life span of kissing bugs in North America is approximately a year, perhaps longer for the large southern species, Triatoma recurva. In the temperate zone, there is usually one generation per year, whereas in Mesoamerica and parts of tropical South America, several generations of bugs may occur within a year. In captivity, adults of southwestern US species live 4–5 months. Well-fed nymphs give rise to larger adults, but longevity of adults is enhanced by feedings that are more spaced apart.11 Kissing bugs in the Southwest (Figs. 2–4), particularly Triatoma rubida and Triatoma protracta, commonly infest packrat (Neotoma albigula) nests and before or during the summer monsoon rains undergo dispersal flights at dusk. They are attracted to lights in houses and may enter these domiciles where they survive for some time feeding on humans and pets in the household.


Kissing bugs in the United States: risk for vector-borne disease in humans.

Klotz SA, Dorn PL, Mosbacher M, Schmidt JO - Environ Health Insights (2014)

Female Triatoma rubida, a common cause of anaphylaxis in Arizona. (Photograph by Justin Schmidt with permission.)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264683&req=5

f2-ehi-suppl.2-2014-049: Female Triatoma rubida, a common cause of anaphylaxis in Arizona. (Photograph by Justin Schmidt with permission.)
Mentions: Kissing bug eggs hatch into wingless larvae, often called nymphs, of which there are five stages, each stage requiring at least one blood meal to molt. The fifth instar or nymph molts to a winged adult that, when given the opportunity, feeds every several weeks, or even more than once a week, depending upon ambient temperature and season of the year.9 When food is unavailable, or conditions unsuitable, T. infestans in South America can survive for 7 months without feeding. The life span of kissing bugs in North America is approximately a year, perhaps longer for the large southern species, Triatoma recurva. In the temperate zone, there is usually one generation per year, whereas in Mesoamerica and parts of tropical South America, several generations of bugs may occur within a year. In captivity, adults of southwestern US species live 4–5 months. Well-fed nymphs give rise to larger adults, but longevity of adults is enhanced by feedings that are more spaced apart.11 Kissing bugs in the Southwest (Figs. 2–4), particularly Triatoma rubida and Triatoma protracta, commonly infest packrat (Neotoma albigula) nests and before or during the summer monsoon rains undergo dispersal flights at dusk. They are attracted to lights in houses and may enter these domiciles where they survive for some time feeding on humans and pets in the household.

Bottom Line: Eleven species of kissing bugs are found in the United States.Kissing bugs are capable of adapting to new habitats such as human domiciles; however, they do not colonize homes in the United States as in Central and South America.Where possible, descriptions of US species are compared to the epidemiologically important Latin American species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA.

ABSTRACT
Eleven species of kissing bugs are found in the United States. Their home ranges may be expanding northward, perhaps as a consequence of climate change. At least eight of the species, perhaps all, are reported to harbor Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Because humans are encroaching on kissing bug habitat, there is concern for vector-transmitted Chagas disease in the United States. To date, documented autochthonous cases of Chagas in humans in the United States are rare. Kissing bugs are capable of adapting to new habitats such as human domiciles; however, they do not colonize homes in the United States as in Central and South America. We review the biology, behavior, and medical importance of kissing bugs and the risk they pose for transmission of Chagas disease in the United States. Where possible, descriptions of US species are compared to the epidemiologically important Latin American species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus