Limits...
Ideal resuscitation pressure for uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock in different ages and sexes of rats.

Li T, Zhu Y, Tian K, Xue M, Peng X, Lan D, Liu L - Crit Care (2013)

Bottom Line: For same target resuscitation pressures, the beneficial effect on hemorrhagic shock had a significant age difference (P < 0.01) but no sex difference (P > 0.05).Different resuscitation pressures had no effect on coagulation function.Their resuscitation effects have significant age difference but had no sex difference.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Our previous studies demonstrated that 50-60 mmHg mean arterial blood pressure was the ideal target hypotension for uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock during the active hemorrhage in sexually mature rats. The ideal target resuscitation pressure for immature and older rats has not been determined.

Methods: To elucidate this issue, using uncontrolled hemorrhagic-shock rats of different ages and sexes (6 weeks, 14 weeks and 1.5 years representing pre-adult, adult and older rats, respectively), the resuscitation effects of different target pressures (40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 mmHg) on uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock during active hemorrhage and the age and sex differences were observed.

Results: Different target resuscitation pressures had different resuscitation outcomes for the same age and sex of rats. The optimal target resuscitation pressures for 6-week-old, 14-week-old and 1.5-year-old rats were 40 to 50 mmHg, 50 to 60 mmHg and 70 mmHg respectively. Ideal target resuscitation pressures were significantly superior to other resuscitation pressures in improving the hemodynamics, blood perfusion, organ function and animal survival of uncontrolled hemorrhagic-shock rats (P < 0.01). For same target resuscitation pressures, the beneficial effect on hemorrhagic shock had a significant age difference (P < 0.01) but no sex difference (P > 0.05). Different resuscitation pressures had no effect on coagulation function.

Conclusion: Hemorrhagic-shock rats at different ages have different target resuscitation pressures during active hemorrhage. The ideal target resuscitation hypotension for 6-week-old, 14-week-old and 1.5-year-old rats was 40 to 50 mmHg, 50 to 60 mmHg and 70 mmHg, respectively. Their resuscitation effects have significant age difference but had no sex difference.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of resuscitation pressure on blood loss and fluid requirement inhemorrhagic shock. (A), (B), (C): Amount of blood loss duringphase I and phase II. (D), (E), (F): Fluid requirements to maintainthe target resuscitation pressure during phase II. Data presented as mean± standard deviation (n = 16/group). Analysis of varianceshowed there were significant differences in blood losses and fluidrequirements between ages and different target resuscitation pressures(P < 0.01), but no significant differences between sexes(P > 0.05). *P < 0.05 versus no treatment group(No); #P < 0.05, ##P < 0.01 versus 40 mmHg group(post-hoc Tukey test).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264615&req=5

Figure 2: Effects of resuscitation pressure on blood loss and fluid requirement inhemorrhagic shock. (A), (B), (C): Amount of blood loss duringphase I and phase II. (D), (E), (F): Fluid requirements to maintainthe target resuscitation pressure during phase II. Data presented as mean± standard deviation (n = 16/group). Analysis of varianceshowed there were significant differences in blood losses and fluidrequirements between ages and different target resuscitation pressures(P < 0.01), but no significant differences between sexes(P > 0.05). *P < 0.05 versus no treatment group(No); #P < 0.05, ##P < 0.01 versus 40 mmHg group(post-hoc Tukey test).

Mentions: The total blood loss during phase I and phase II had significant differencesbetween ages and target resuscitation pressures (P < 0.01).Six-week-old rats had more blood loss than 14-week-old rats and 1.5-year-old rats.The 1.5-year-old rats bled least. For example, at 80 mmHg target resuscitationpressure, blood loss in 6-week-old, 14-week-old and 1.5-year-old rats was about87.5 to 91.5 ml/kg, 58.6 to 61.5 ml/kg and 53.5 to 57.5 ml/kg, respectively. Inthe same age group, as the target resuscitation pressure increased, the totalblood loss was significantly increased. There were no significant differencesbetween sexes in blood loss (P > 0.05) (Figures 2A, B,C).


Ideal resuscitation pressure for uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock in different ages and sexes of rats.

Li T, Zhu Y, Tian K, Xue M, Peng X, Lan D, Liu L - Crit Care (2013)

Effects of resuscitation pressure on blood loss and fluid requirement inhemorrhagic shock. (A), (B), (C): Amount of blood loss duringphase I and phase II. (D), (E), (F): Fluid requirements to maintainthe target resuscitation pressure during phase II. Data presented as mean± standard deviation (n = 16/group). Analysis of varianceshowed there were significant differences in blood losses and fluidrequirements between ages and different target resuscitation pressures(P < 0.01), but no significant differences between sexes(P > 0.05). *P < 0.05 versus no treatment group(No); #P < 0.05, ##P < 0.01 versus 40 mmHg group(post-hoc Tukey test).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264615&req=5

Figure 2: Effects of resuscitation pressure on blood loss and fluid requirement inhemorrhagic shock. (A), (B), (C): Amount of blood loss duringphase I and phase II. (D), (E), (F): Fluid requirements to maintainthe target resuscitation pressure during phase II. Data presented as mean± standard deviation (n = 16/group). Analysis of varianceshowed there were significant differences in blood losses and fluidrequirements between ages and different target resuscitation pressures(P < 0.01), but no significant differences between sexes(P > 0.05). *P < 0.05 versus no treatment group(No); #P < 0.05, ##P < 0.01 versus 40 mmHg group(post-hoc Tukey test).
Mentions: The total blood loss during phase I and phase II had significant differencesbetween ages and target resuscitation pressures (P < 0.01).Six-week-old rats had more blood loss than 14-week-old rats and 1.5-year-old rats.The 1.5-year-old rats bled least. For example, at 80 mmHg target resuscitationpressure, blood loss in 6-week-old, 14-week-old and 1.5-year-old rats was about87.5 to 91.5 ml/kg, 58.6 to 61.5 ml/kg and 53.5 to 57.5 ml/kg, respectively. Inthe same age group, as the target resuscitation pressure increased, the totalblood loss was significantly increased. There were no significant differencesbetween sexes in blood loss (P > 0.05) (Figures 2A, B,C).

Bottom Line: For same target resuscitation pressures, the beneficial effect on hemorrhagic shock had a significant age difference (P < 0.01) but no sex difference (P > 0.05).Different resuscitation pressures had no effect on coagulation function.Their resuscitation effects have significant age difference but had no sex difference.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Our previous studies demonstrated that 50-60 mmHg mean arterial blood pressure was the ideal target hypotension for uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock during the active hemorrhage in sexually mature rats. The ideal target resuscitation pressure for immature and older rats has not been determined.

Methods: To elucidate this issue, using uncontrolled hemorrhagic-shock rats of different ages and sexes (6 weeks, 14 weeks and 1.5 years representing pre-adult, adult and older rats, respectively), the resuscitation effects of different target pressures (40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 mmHg) on uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock during active hemorrhage and the age and sex differences were observed.

Results: Different target resuscitation pressures had different resuscitation outcomes for the same age and sex of rats. The optimal target resuscitation pressures for 6-week-old, 14-week-old and 1.5-year-old rats were 40 to 50 mmHg, 50 to 60 mmHg and 70 mmHg respectively. Ideal target resuscitation pressures were significantly superior to other resuscitation pressures in improving the hemodynamics, blood perfusion, organ function and animal survival of uncontrolled hemorrhagic-shock rats (P < 0.01). For same target resuscitation pressures, the beneficial effect on hemorrhagic shock had a significant age difference (P < 0.01) but no sex difference (P > 0.05). Different resuscitation pressures had no effect on coagulation function.

Conclusion: Hemorrhagic-shock rats at different ages have different target resuscitation pressures during active hemorrhage. The ideal target resuscitation hypotension for 6-week-old, 14-week-old and 1.5-year-old rats was 40 to 50 mmHg, 50 to 60 mmHg and 70 mmHg, respectively. Their resuscitation effects have significant age difference but had no sex difference.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus