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Cost effective technologies and renewable substrates for biosurfactants' production.

Banat IM, Satpute SK, Cameotra SS, Patil R, Nyayanit NV - Front Microbiol (2014)

Bottom Line: It is important to note that although a number of developments have taken place in the field of BS industries, large scale production remains economically challenging for many types of these products.This is mainly due to the huge monetary difference between the investment and achievable productivity from the commercial point of view.This review discusses low cost, renewable raw substrates, and fermentation technology in BS/BE production processes and their role in reducing the production cost.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Life and Health Sciences, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster Coleraine, UK.

ABSTRACT
Diverse types of microbial surface active amphiphilic molecules are produced by a range of microbial communities. The extraordinary properties of biosurfactant/bioemulsifier (BS/BE) as surface active products allows them to have key roles in various field of applications such as bioremediation, biodegradation, enhanced oil recovery, pharmaceutics, food processing among many others. This leads to a vast number of potential applications of these BS/BE in different industrial sectors. Despite the huge number of reports and patents describing BS and BE applications and advantages, commercialization of these compounds remain difficult, costly and to a large extent irregular. This is mainly due to the usage of chemically synthesized media for growing producing microorganism and in turn the production of preferred quality products. It is important to note that although a number of developments have taken place in the field of BS industries, large scale production remains economically challenging for many types of these products. This is mainly due to the huge monetary difference between the investment and achievable productivity from the commercial point of view. This review discusses low cost, renewable raw substrates, and fermentation technology in BS/BE production processes and their role in reducing the production cost.

No MeSH data available.


Approximate percentage distribution for literature available on various renewable substrates used for biosurfactants production.
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Figure 1: Approximate percentage distribution for literature available on various renewable substrates used for biosurfactants production.

Mentions: Meat processing industries such as food and leather produces significant quantities of animal fat, tallow and lard. Demand for animal fats is considerably less than vegetable oils and much of it becomes a problem for utilization as well as for their disposal. In comparison with other renewable substrates, animal fat and oil has not been much explored (Figure 1). An alternative option for such products is using them as raw material or substrates for production of commercial imperative compounds. Animal fat has been reported to act as a stimulator for the production of SLs BS from C. bombicola yeast (Deshpande and Daniels, 1995). One of the main outcome of their investigation indicated that this yeast grows poorly in presence of fat alone in the production medium. Mixture of glucose (10% w/v) and fat (10% v/v), however, enhances the growth of the yeast and the production of SLs (120 g/L). Recently, Santos et al. (2013) reported maximum glycolipid BS production using animal fat combined with corn steep liquor as compared to other carbon sources using yeast Candida lipolytica UCP0988. They also reported the product to have uses in bioremediation, oil mobilization, and recovery.


Cost effective technologies and renewable substrates for biosurfactants' production.

Banat IM, Satpute SK, Cameotra SS, Patil R, Nyayanit NV - Front Microbiol (2014)

Approximate percentage distribution for literature available on various renewable substrates used for biosurfactants production.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264478&req=5

Figure 1: Approximate percentage distribution for literature available on various renewable substrates used for biosurfactants production.
Mentions: Meat processing industries such as food and leather produces significant quantities of animal fat, tallow and lard. Demand for animal fats is considerably less than vegetable oils and much of it becomes a problem for utilization as well as for their disposal. In comparison with other renewable substrates, animal fat and oil has not been much explored (Figure 1). An alternative option for such products is using them as raw material or substrates for production of commercial imperative compounds. Animal fat has been reported to act as a stimulator for the production of SLs BS from C. bombicola yeast (Deshpande and Daniels, 1995). One of the main outcome of their investigation indicated that this yeast grows poorly in presence of fat alone in the production medium. Mixture of glucose (10% w/v) and fat (10% v/v), however, enhances the growth of the yeast and the production of SLs (120 g/L). Recently, Santos et al. (2013) reported maximum glycolipid BS production using animal fat combined with corn steep liquor as compared to other carbon sources using yeast Candida lipolytica UCP0988. They also reported the product to have uses in bioremediation, oil mobilization, and recovery.

Bottom Line: It is important to note that although a number of developments have taken place in the field of BS industries, large scale production remains economically challenging for many types of these products.This is mainly due to the huge monetary difference between the investment and achievable productivity from the commercial point of view.This review discusses low cost, renewable raw substrates, and fermentation technology in BS/BE production processes and their role in reducing the production cost.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Life and Health Sciences, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster Coleraine, UK.

ABSTRACT
Diverse types of microbial surface active amphiphilic molecules are produced by a range of microbial communities. The extraordinary properties of biosurfactant/bioemulsifier (BS/BE) as surface active products allows them to have key roles in various field of applications such as bioremediation, biodegradation, enhanced oil recovery, pharmaceutics, food processing among many others. This leads to a vast number of potential applications of these BS/BE in different industrial sectors. Despite the huge number of reports and patents describing BS and BE applications and advantages, commercialization of these compounds remain difficult, costly and to a large extent irregular. This is mainly due to the usage of chemically synthesized media for growing producing microorganism and in turn the production of preferred quality products. It is important to note that although a number of developments have taken place in the field of BS industries, large scale production remains economically challenging for many types of these products. This is mainly due to the huge monetary difference between the investment and achievable productivity from the commercial point of view. This review discusses low cost, renewable raw substrates, and fermentation technology in BS/BE production processes and their role in reducing the production cost.

No MeSH data available.