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Frequency of provision of knowledge of performance on skill acquisition in older persons.

Nunes ME, Souza MG, Basso L, Monteiro CB, Corrêa UC, Santos S - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: The objective of this study was to examine the effect of frequency of knowledge of performance (KP) during the acquisition of the basketball free throw in older persons.Sessions were recorded in order to confirm whether volunteers were able to score throughout sessions.ANOVA indicated that all individuals showed an improved performance in the retention and transfer tests.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Motor Behaviour, School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Sao Paulo Sao Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The provision of feedback is a crucial factor for the evolution of the learner's performance. It is known that the knowledge of performance has the function of guiding the learner's attention to critical aspects of the movement pattern. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of frequency of knowledge of performance (KP) during the acquisition of the basketball free throw in older persons. Sixty active individuals (men and women) aged 60-69 years of age, divided into three experimental groups received KP in 100, 66, and 33% of their attempts during three practice sessions totaling 90 trials. The task was the basketball free throw. Volunteers were asked to conduct tests of immediate retention, 24 h retention, and 24 h transfer test, after the last practice session. During the acquisition phase, the volunteers received KP on the movement pattern on the previous attempt, which was obtained from a qualitative hierarchical checklist of the free throw (14 items). Sessions were recorded in order to confirm whether volunteers were able to score throughout sessions. ANOVA indicated that all individuals showed an improved performance in the retention and transfer tests. But the KP frequency of 66% was superior in both qualitative (movement pattern) and quantitative (score) measurements throughout the trials (p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion older persons seem to need an optimal KP frequency supply during the learning process.

No MeSH data available.


Frequency of observations of the checklist items (%) during the acquisition phase (B1–B9), retention tests (R5 and R24), and transfer test (T) of G100 (A), G66 (B), and G33 (C) groups.
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Figure 3: Frequency of observations of the checklist items (%) during the acquisition phase (B1–B9), retention tests (R5 and R24), and transfer test (T) of G100 (A), G66 (B), and G33 (C) groups.

Mentions: In order to contrast the frequency of Critical Errors (or checklist items) in each group, we calculated the percentage of the times that each item of the checklist was observed for each group over each block of practice. This is because, the checklist items observed reflects individual’s movement pattern error, and we can see a qualitative change throughout practice, as an indicative of movement quality improvement. This is shown in Figure 3.


Frequency of provision of knowledge of performance on skill acquisition in older persons.

Nunes ME, Souza MG, Basso L, Monteiro CB, Corrêa UC, Santos S - Front Psychol (2014)

Frequency of observations of the checklist items (%) during the acquisition phase (B1–B9), retention tests (R5 and R24), and transfer test (T) of G100 (A), G66 (B), and G33 (C) groups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264408&req=5

Figure 3: Frequency of observations of the checklist items (%) during the acquisition phase (B1–B9), retention tests (R5 and R24), and transfer test (T) of G100 (A), G66 (B), and G33 (C) groups.
Mentions: In order to contrast the frequency of Critical Errors (or checklist items) in each group, we calculated the percentage of the times that each item of the checklist was observed for each group over each block of practice. This is because, the checklist items observed reflects individual’s movement pattern error, and we can see a qualitative change throughout practice, as an indicative of movement quality improvement. This is shown in Figure 3.

Bottom Line: The objective of this study was to examine the effect of frequency of knowledge of performance (KP) during the acquisition of the basketball free throw in older persons.Sessions were recorded in order to confirm whether volunteers were able to score throughout sessions.ANOVA indicated that all individuals showed an improved performance in the retention and transfer tests.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Motor Behaviour, School of Physical Education and Sport, University of Sao Paulo Sao Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The provision of feedback is a crucial factor for the evolution of the learner's performance. It is known that the knowledge of performance has the function of guiding the learner's attention to critical aspects of the movement pattern. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of frequency of knowledge of performance (KP) during the acquisition of the basketball free throw in older persons. Sixty active individuals (men and women) aged 60-69 years of age, divided into three experimental groups received KP in 100, 66, and 33% of their attempts during three practice sessions totaling 90 trials. The task was the basketball free throw. Volunteers were asked to conduct tests of immediate retention, 24 h retention, and 24 h transfer test, after the last practice session. During the acquisition phase, the volunteers received KP on the movement pattern on the previous attempt, which was obtained from a qualitative hierarchical checklist of the free throw (14 items). Sessions were recorded in order to confirm whether volunteers were able to score throughout sessions. ANOVA indicated that all individuals showed an improved performance in the retention and transfer tests. But the KP frequency of 66% was superior in both qualitative (movement pattern) and quantitative (score) measurements throughout the trials (p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion older persons seem to need an optimal KP frequency supply during the learning process.

No MeSH data available.