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Polymerization Parameters Influencing the QCM Response Characteristics of BSA MIP.

Phan NV, Sussitz HF, Lieberzeit PA - Biosensors (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: Lower amounts lead to higher sensitivity, but also sensor response times substantially increase (to up to 10 h) at constant imprinting effect (signal ratio MIP/NIP on quartz crystal microbalance-QCM).However, by shifting the polymer properties to more hydrophilic by replacing methacrylic acid by acrylic acid, part of the decreased sensitivity can be recovered leading to appreciable sensor responses.Changing polymer morphology by bulk imprinting and nanoparticle approaches has much lower influence on sensitivity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty for Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währinger Straße 38, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; E-Mails: honamd99@yahoo.com (N.V.H.P.); hermann.franz.sussitz@univie.ac.at (H.F.S.).

ABSTRACT
Designing Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for sensing proteins is still a somewhat empirical process due to the inherent complexity of protein imprinting. Based on Bovine Serum Albumin as a model analyte, we explored the influence of a range of experimental parameters on the final sensor responses. The optimized polymer contains 70% cross linker. Lower amounts lead to higher sensitivity, but also sensor response times substantially increase (to up to 10 h) at constant imprinting effect (signal ratio MIP/NIP on quartz crystal microbalance-QCM). However, by shifting the polymer properties to more hydrophilic by replacing methacrylic acid by acrylic acid, part of the decreased sensitivity can be recovered leading to appreciable sensor responses. Changing polymer morphology by bulk imprinting and nanoparticle approaches has much lower influence on sensitivity.

No MeSH data available.


Sensor characteristic of the optimized polymer towards Albumin.
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biosensors-04-00161-f006: Sensor characteristic of the optimized polymer towards Albumin.

Mentions: To obtain a sensor characteristic of an Albumin sensor, polymer AA3 with a cross linker ratio of 70% (w/w) and a functional monomer ratio of 2:3 AA:VP was chosen. First measurements indicate that the acrylic acid is the driving force for the interaction between the protein and the polymer. When decreasing the functional monomer ratio of acrylic acid the interaction is reduced, therefore the sensor response signal is decreased. On the other hand the diffusion into the polymer seems to be enhanced by a higher amount of VP. It was possible to calibrate the sensor in a dynamic range ranging from 10 to 100 mg/L (0.15–1.5 µM/L) as shown in Figure 6.


Polymerization Parameters Influencing the QCM Response Characteristics of BSA MIP.

Phan NV, Sussitz HF, Lieberzeit PA - Biosensors (Basel) (2014)

Sensor characteristic of the optimized polymer towards Albumin.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264377&req=5

biosensors-04-00161-f006: Sensor characteristic of the optimized polymer towards Albumin.
Mentions: To obtain a sensor characteristic of an Albumin sensor, polymer AA3 with a cross linker ratio of 70% (w/w) and a functional monomer ratio of 2:3 AA:VP was chosen. First measurements indicate that the acrylic acid is the driving force for the interaction between the protein and the polymer. When decreasing the functional monomer ratio of acrylic acid the interaction is reduced, therefore the sensor response signal is decreased. On the other hand the diffusion into the polymer seems to be enhanced by a higher amount of VP. It was possible to calibrate the sensor in a dynamic range ranging from 10 to 100 mg/L (0.15–1.5 µM/L) as shown in Figure 6.

Bottom Line: Lower amounts lead to higher sensitivity, but also sensor response times substantially increase (to up to 10 h) at constant imprinting effect (signal ratio MIP/NIP on quartz crystal microbalance-QCM).However, by shifting the polymer properties to more hydrophilic by replacing methacrylic acid by acrylic acid, part of the decreased sensitivity can be recovered leading to appreciable sensor responses.Changing polymer morphology by bulk imprinting and nanoparticle approaches has much lower influence on sensitivity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty for Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währinger Straße 38, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; E-Mails: honamd99@yahoo.com (N.V.H.P.); hermann.franz.sussitz@univie.ac.at (H.F.S.).

ABSTRACT
Designing Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for sensing proteins is still a somewhat empirical process due to the inherent complexity of protein imprinting. Based on Bovine Serum Albumin as a model analyte, we explored the influence of a range of experimental parameters on the final sensor responses. The optimized polymer contains 70% cross linker. Lower amounts lead to higher sensitivity, but also sensor response times substantially increase (to up to 10 h) at constant imprinting effect (signal ratio MIP/NIP on quartz crystal microbalance-QCM). However, by shifting the polymer properties to more hydrophilic by replacing methacrylic acid by acrylic acid, part of the decreased sensitivity can be recovered leading to appreciable sensor responses. Changing polymer morphology by bulk imprinting and nanoparticle approaches has much lower influence on sensitivity.

No MeSH data available.