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Polymerization Parameters Influencing the QCM Response Characteristics of BSA MIP.

Phan NV, Sussitz HF, Lieberzeit PA - Biosensors (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: Lower amounts lead to higher sensitivity, but also sensor response times substantially increase (to up to 10 h) at constant imprinting effect (signal ratio MIP/NIP on quartz crystal microbalance-QCM).However, by shifting the polymer properties to more hydrophilic by replacing methacrylic acid by acrylic acid, part of the decreased sensitivity can be recovered leading to appreciable sensor responses.Changing polymer morphology by bulk imprinting and nanoparticle approaches has much lower influence on sensitivity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty for Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währinger Straße 38, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; E-Mails: honamd99@yahoo.com (N.V.H.P.); hermann.franz.sussitz@univie.ac.at (H.F.S.).

ABSTRACT
Designing Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for sensing proteins is still a somewhat empirical process due to the inherent complexity of protein imprinting. Based on Bovine Serum Albumin as a model analyte, we explored the influence of a range of experimental parameters on the final sensor responses. The optimized polymer contains 70% cross linker. Lower amounts lead to higher sensitivity, but also sensor response times substantially increase (to up to 10 h) at constant imprinting effect (signal ratio MIP/NIP on quartz crystal microbalance-QCM). However, by shifting the polymer properties to more hydrophilic by replacing methacrylic acid by acrylic acid, part of the decreased sensitivity can be recovered leading to appreciable sensor responses. Changing polymer morphology by bulk imprinting and nanoparticle approaches has much lower influence on sensitivity.

No MeSH data available.


Sensor signals for MIP containing different amounts of cross linker (w/w); functional monomers (MAA:VP; 5:2 w/w).
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biosensors-04-00161-f004: Sensor signals for MIP containing different amounts of cross linker (w/w); functional monomers (MAA:VP; 5:2 w/w).

Mentions: Repeated measurement with the same quartz revealed that the sensor signal remains basically constant, namely 470 Hz. However the response time increased to 16 h. This effect indicates less pronounced interaction sites, which can be explained by cross-linker cleavage by slightly alkaline washing solutions. During further experiments the monomer ratio (MAA:VP) was kept constant at 5:2 (w/w), while the cross-linker ratio was increased up to 70% (w/w). The corresponding polymer compositions are summarized in Table 1 below. Polymers with cross-linker ratios of 40, 50, 60 and 70% (w/w) were prepared and measured as described before. The respective results are shown in Figure 4. The sensors were characterized in terms of sensor signal and response times.


Polymerization Parameters Influencing the QCM Response Characteristics of BSA MIP.

Phan NV, Sussitz HF, Lieberzeit PA - Biosensors (Basel) (2014)

Sensor signals for MIP containing different amounts of cross linker (w/w); functional monomers (MAA:VP; 5:2 w/w).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264377&req=5

biosensors-04-00161-f004: Sensor signals for MIP containing different amounts of cross linker (w/w); functional monomers (MAA:VP; 5:2 w/w).
Mentions: Repeated measurement with the same quartz revealed that the sensor signal remains basically constant, namely 470 Hz. However the response time increased to 16 h. This effect indicates less pronounced interaction sites, which can be explained by cross-linker cleavage by slightly alkaline washing solutions. During further experiments the monomer ratio (MAA:VP) was kept constant at 5:2 (w/w), while the cross-linker ratio was increased up to 70% (w/w). The corresponding polymer compositions are summarized in Table 1 below. Polymers with cross-linker ratios of 40, 50, 60 and 70% (w/w) were prepared and measured as described before. The respective results are shown in Figure 4. The sensors were characterized in terms of sensor signal and response times.

Bottom Line: Lower amounts lead to higher sensitivity, but also sensor response times substantially increase (to up to 10 h) at constant imprinting effect (signal ratio MIP/NIP on quartz crystal microbalance-QCM).However, by shifting the polymer properties to more hydrophilic by replacing methacrylic acid by acrylic acid, part of the decreased sensitivity can be recovered leading to appreciable sensor responses.Changing polymer morphology by bulk imprinting and nanoparticle approaches has much lower influence on sensitivity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty for Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währinger Straße 38, A-1090 Vienna, Austria; E-Mails: honamd99@yahoo.com (N.V.H.P.); hermann.franz.sussitz@univie.ac.at (H.F.S.).

ABSTRACT
Designing Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for sensing proteins is still a somewhat empirical process due to the inherent complexity of protein imprinting. Based on Bovine Serum Albumin as a model analyte, we explored the influence of a range of experimental parameters on the final sensor responses. The optimized polymer contains 70% cross linker. Lower amounts lead to higher sensitivity, but also sensor response times substantially increase (to up to 10 h) at constant imprinting effect (signal ratio MIP/NIP on quartz crystal microbalance-QCM). However, by shifting the polymer properties to more hydrophilic by replacing methacrylic acid by acrylic acid, part of the decreased sensitivity can be recovered leading to appreciable sensor responses. Changing polymer morphology by bulk imprinting and nanoparticle approaches has much lower influence on sensitivity.

No MeSH data available.