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Electrochemical biosensors based on ferroceneboronic Acid and its derivatives: a review.

Wang B, Takahashi S, Du X, Anzai J - Biosensors (Basel) (2014)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, FcBA derivatives have been studied to construct lectin; steroids; nucleotides; salicylic acid; and bacteria sensors.One of the limitations of FcBA-based sensors comes from the fact that FcBA derivatives are added in sample solutions as reagents.FcBA derivatives should be immobilized on the surface of electrodes for developing reagentless sensors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xilu, Jinan, Shandong 250012, China; E-Mail: bzhenw@hotmail.com ; Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578, Japan; E-Mail: t-shigehiro@m.tohoku.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
We review recent progress in the development of electrochemical biosensors based on ferroceneboronic acid (FcBA) and ferrocene (Fc)-modified boronic acids. These compounds can be used to construct electrochemical biosensors because they consist of a binding site (i.e., a boronic acid moiety) and an electrochemically active part (i.e., an Fc residue). By taking advantage of the unique properties of FcBA and its derivatives, electrochemical sensors sensitive to sugars, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fluoride (F(-)) ions, and so forth have been widely studied. FcBA-based sugar sensors rely on the selective binding of FcBA to 1,2- or 1,3-diol residues of sugars through the formation of cyclic boronate ester bonds. The redox properties of FcBA-sugar adduct differ from those of free FcBA, which forms the basis of the electrochemical determination of sugars. Thus, non-enzymatic glucose sensors are now being actively studied using FcBA and Fc-modified boronic acids as redox markers. Using a similar principle, HbA1c can be detected by FcBA-based electrochemical systems because it contains hydrocarbon chains on the polypeptide chain. HbA1c sensors are useful for monitoring blood glucose levels over the preceding 8-12 weeks. In addition, FcBA and Fc-modified boronic acids have been used for the detection of F(-) ions due to the selective binding of boronic acid to F(-) ions. F(-)-ion sensors may be useful alternatives to conventional ion-selective electrodes sensitive to F(-) ion. Furthermore, FcBA derivatives have been studied to construct lectin; steroids; nucleotides; salicylic acid; and bacteria sensors. One of the limitations of FcBA-based sensors comes from the fact that FcBA derivatives are added in sample solutions as reagents. FcBA derivatives should be immobilized on the surface of electrodes for developing reagentless sensors.

No MeSH data available.


Chemical structure of catecholboryl-modified ferrocene.
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biosensors-04-00243-f009: Chemical structure of catecholboryl-modified ferrocene.

Mentions: The Fallis and Aldridge group studied F− ion binding and redox properties of Fc derivatives with mono-, bis-, and tetra-boronate esters [41,42]. If the shift in redox potential of the Fc derivative induced upon F− ion binding is sufficiently large, the Fc moiety is aerobically oxidized. In such a case, F− ion- may be detected by a color change in the Fc derivatives because their oxidized form exhibits a new absorption band around 600 nm, which is associated with a charge-transfer process. In practice, an F− ion-induced redox potential shift for Fc derivative with mono-boronate ester was insufficient to induce a color change, while Fc derivatives with multiple boronate esters produced color changes upon the addition of F- ion owing to large shifts in the redox potential. Ghosh and coworkers have recently synthesized catecholboryl-modified Fc (Figure 9) and studied the electrochemical and spectroscopic properties [43]. The compounds exhibited a large cathodic shift in redox potential upon binding F− ion, followed by colorimetric changes associated with the aerobic oxidation of Fc moiety of the compounds. It is worth mentioning that F− ion-induced shifts in the redox potential of the Fc derivatives depend significantly on the type of solvents: redox and colorimetric responses in water are usually weak.


Electrochemical biosensors based on ferroceneboronic Acid and its derivatives: a review.

Wang B, Takahashi S, Du X, Anzai J - Biosensors (Basel) (2014)

Chemical structure of catecholboryl-modified ferrocene.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264357&req=5

biosensors-04-00243-f009: Chemical structure of catecholboryl-modified ferrocene.
Mentions: The Fallis and Aldridge group studied F− ion binding and redox properties of Fc derivatives with mono-, bis-, and tetra-boronate esters [41,42]. If the shift in redox potential of the Fc derivative induced upon F− ion binding is sufficiently large, the Fc moiety is aerobically oxidized. In such a case, F− ion- may be detected by a color change in the Fc derivatives because their oxidized form exhibits a new absorption band around 600 nm, which is associated with a charge-transfer process. In practice, an F− ion-induced redox potential shift for Fc derivative with mono-boronate ester was insufficient to induce a color change, while Fc derivatives with multiple boronate esters produced color changes upon the addition of F- ion owing to large shifts in the redox potential. Ghosh and coworkers have recently synthesized catecholboryl-modified Fc (Figure 9) and studied the electrochemical and spectroscopic properties [43]. The compounds exhibited a large cathodic shift in redox potential upon binding F− ion, followed by colorimetric changes associated with the aerobic oxidation of Fc moiety of the compounds. It is worth mentioning that F− ion-induced shifts in the redox potential of the Fc derivatives depend significantly on the type of solvents: redox and colorimetric responses in water are usually weak.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, FcBA derivatives have been studied to construct lectin; steroids; nucleotides; salicylic acid; and bacteria sensors.One of the limitations of FcBA-based sensors comes from the fact that FcBA derivatives are added in sample solutions as reagents.FcBA derivatives should be immobilized on the surface of electrodes for developing reagentless sensors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xilu, Jinan, Shandong 250012, China; E-Mail: bzhenw@hotmail.com ; Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578, Japan; E-Mail: t-shigehiro@m.tohoku.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
We review recent progress in the development of electrochemical biosensors based on ferroceneboronic acid (FcBA) and ferrocene (Fc)-modified boronic acids. These compounds can be used to construct electrochemical biosensors because they consist of a binding site (i.e., a boronic acid moiety) and an electrochemically active part (i.e., an Fc residue). By taking advantage of the unique properties of FcBA and its derivatives, electrochemical sensors sensitive to sugars, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fluoride (F(-)) ions, and so forth have been widely studied. FcBA-based sugar sensors rely on the selective binding of FcBA to 1,2- or 1,3-diol residues of sugars through the formation of cyclic boronate ester bonds. The redox properties of FcBA-sugar adduct differ from those of free FcBA, which forms the basis of the electrochemical determination of sugars. Thus, non-enzymatic glucose sensors are now being actively studied using FcBA and Fc-modified boronic acids as redox markers. Using a similar principle, HbA1c can be detected by FcBA-based electrochemical systems because it contains hydrocarbon chains on the polypeptide chain. HbA1c sensors are useful for monitoring blood glucose levels over the preceding 8-12 weeks. In addition, FcBA and Fc-modified boronic acids have been used for the detection of F(-) ions due to the selective binding of boronic acid to F(-) ions. F(-)-ion sensors may be useful alternatives to conventional ion-selective electrodes sensitive to F(-) ion. Furthermore, FcBA derivatives have been studied to construct lectin; steroids; nucleotides; salicylic acid; and bacteria sensors. One of the limitations of FcBA-based sensors comes from the fact that FcBA derivatives are added in sample solutions as reagents. FcBA derivatives should be immobilized on the surface of electrodes for developing reagentless sensors.

No MeSH data available.