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Monitoring the Effect of Metal Ions on the Mobility of Artemia salina Nauplii.

Kokkali V, Katramados I, Newman JD - Biosensors (Basel) (2011)

Bottom Line: This study aims to measure the effect of toxic aqueous solutions of metals on the mobility of Artemia salina nauplii by using digital image processing.The instrument consists of a camera with a macro lens, a dark chamber, a light source and a laptop computer.Furthermore, concentrations of parts per trillion of toxic compounds could be detected for some of the metals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cranfield Health, Vincent Building, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, UK. v.kokkali.s06@cranfield.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
This study aims to measure the effect of toxic aqueous solutions of metals on the mobility of Artemia salina nauplii by using digital image processing. The instrument consists of a camera with a macro lens, a dark chamber, a light source and a laptop computer. Four nauplii were inserted into a macro cuvette, which contained copper, cadmium, iron and zinc ions at various concentrations. The nauplii were then filmed inside the dark chamber for two minutes and the video sequence was processed by a motion tracking algorithm that estimated their mobility. The results obtained by this system were compared to the mortality assay of the Artemia salina nauplii. Despite the small number of tested organisms, this system demonstrates great sensitivity in quantifying the mobility of the nauplii, which leads to significantly lower EC50 values than those of the mortality assay. Furthermore, concentrations of parts per trillion of toxic compounds could be detected for some of the metals. The main novelty of this instrument relies in the sub-pixel accuracy of the tracking algorithm that enables robust measurement of the deterioration of the mobility of Artemia salina even at very low concentrations of toxic metals.

No MeSH data available.


The left image shows a representative video frame as captured by the camera. A sequence of such frames forms the input to the digital image processing algorithm. Although the shrimps are not clearly visible in the cuvette, they can be tracked with good accuracy in order to measure their mobility. The remaining images show some characteristic examples of tracking paths which were derived over 6.6 s intervals. Lighter gray shades denote areas of higher mobility including overlapping tracking paths
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biosensors-01-00036-f002: The left image shows a representative video frame as captured by the camera. A sequence of such frames forms the input to the digital image processing algorithm. Although the shrimps are not clearly visible in the cuvette, they can be tracked with good accuracy in order to measure their mobility. The remaining images show some characteristic examples of tracking paths which were derived over 6.6 s intervals. Lighter gray shades denote areas of higher mobility including overlapping tracking paths

Mentions: Video sequences were recorded for two minutes for all the controls and samples. All the cells were properly illuminated with LED torches. In each video sequence, the nauplii were counted and tracked as illustrated in Figure 2. The % mobility of the nauplii in each sample was estimated according to the following Equation (2):(2)where V24 is the average speed per nauplius in a specific sample after 24 h of exposure to the toxicant as was estimated automatically from the algorithm and V0 is the average speed per nauplius in the control samples.


Monitoring the Effect of Metal Ions on the Mobility of Artemia salina Nauplii.

Kokkali V, Katramados I, Newman JD - Biosensors (Basel) (2011)

The left image shows a representative video frame as captured by the camera. A sequence of such frames forms the input to the digital image processing algorithm. Although the shrimps are not clearly visible in the cuvette, they can be tracked with good accuracy in order to measure their mobility. The remaining images show some characteristic examples of tracking paths which were derived over 6.6 s intervals. Lighter gray shades denote areas of higher mobility including overlapping tracking paths
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4264340&req=5

biosensors-01-00036-f002: The left image shows a representative video frame as captured by the camera. A sequence of such frames forms the input to the digital image processing algorithm. Although the shrimps are not clearly visible in the cuvette, they can be tracked with good accuracy in order to measure their mobility. The remaining images show some characteristic examples of tracking paths which were derived over 6.6 s intervals. Lighter gray shades denote areas of higher mobility including overlapping tracking paths
Mentions: Video sequences were recorded for two minutes for all the controls and samples. All the cells were properly illuminated with LED torches. In each video sequence, the nauplii were counted and tracked as illustrated in Figure 2. The % mobility of the nauplii in each sample was estimated according to the following Equation (2):(2)where V24 is the average speed per nauplius in a specific sample after 24 h of exposure to the toxicant as was estimated automatically from the algorithm and V0 is the average speed per nauplius in the control samples.

Bottom Line: This study aims to measure the effect of toxic aqueous solutions of metals on the mobility of Artemia salina nauplii by using digital image processing.The instrument consists of a camera with a macro lens, a dark chamber, a light source and a laptop computer.Furthermore, concentrations of parts per trillion of toxic compounds could be detected for some of the metals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cranfield Health, Vincent Building, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, UK. v.kokkali.s06@cranfield.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
This study aims to measure the effect of toxic aqueous solutions of metals on the mobility of Artemia salina nauplii by using digital image processing. The instrument consists of a camera with a macro lens, a dark chamber, a light source and a laptop computer. Four nauplii were inserted into a macro cuvette, which contained copper, cadmium, iron and zinc ions at various concentrations. The nauplii were then filmed inside the dark chamber for two minutes and the video sequence was processed by a motion tracking algorithm that estimated their mobility. The results obtained by this system were compared to the mortality assay of the Artemia salina nauplii. Despite the small number of tested organisms, this system demonstrates great sensitivity in quantifying the mobility of the nauplii, which leads to significantly lower EC50 values than those of the mortality assay. Furthermore, concentrations of parts per trillion of toxic compounds could be detected for some of the metals. The main novelty of this instrument relies in the sub-pixel accuracy of the tracking algorithm that enables robust measurement of the deterioration of the mobility of Artemia salina even at very low concentrations of toxic metals.

No MeSH data available.