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Human centred design considerations for connected health devices for the older adult.

Harte RP, Glynn LG, Broderick BJ, Rodriguez-Molinero A, Baker PM, McGuiness B, O'Sullivan L, Diaz M, Quinlan LR, Ă“Laighin G - J Pers Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Older adults are major users of such devices and are a population significantly increasing in size.This group presents challenges due to the wide spectrum of capabilities and attitudes towards technology.The fit between capabilities of the user and demands of the device can be optimised in a process called Human Centred Design.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering and Informatics, Department Electrical & Electronic Engineering, NUI Galway, University Road, Galway, Ireland. rich1874@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Connected health devices are generally designed for unsupervised use, by non-healthcare professionals, facilitating independent control of the individuals own healthcare. Older adults are major users of such devices and are a population significantly increasing in size. This group presents challenges due to the wide spectrum of capabilities and attitudes towards technology. The fit between capabilities of the user and demands of the device can be optimised in a process called Human Centred Design. Here we review examples of some connected health devices chosen by random selection, assess older adult known capabilities and attitudes and finally make analytical recommendations for design approaches and design specifications.

No MeSH data available.


The general framework of human machine interaction can be applied to connected health devices such as a blood glucose metre.
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jpm-04-00245-f002: The general framework of human machine interaction can be applied to connected health devices such as a blood glucose metre.

Mentions: In relation to the kind of connected health devices listed in Table 3, the general framework of human machine interaction still applies where the user perceives information from a display/device (limited by perception abilities), they process the information to form an impression of the device state (limited by cognitive abilities), they then physically interact with the device (limited by psychomotor skills) this process is illustrated in Figure 2.


Human centred design considerations for connected health devices for the older adult.

Harte RP, Glynn LG, Broderick BJ, Rodriguez-Molinero A, Baker PM, McGuiness B, O'Sullivan L, Diaz M, Quinlan LR, Ă“Laighin G - J Pers Med (2014)

The general framework of human machine interaction can be applied to connected health devices such as a blood glucose metre.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263975&req=5

jpm-04-00245-f002: The general framework of human machine interaction can be applied to connected health devices such as a blood glucose metre.
Mentions: In relation to the kind of connected health devices listed in Table 3, the general framework of human machine interaction still applies where the user perceives information from a display/device (limited by perception abilities), they process the information to form an impression of the device state (limited by cognitive abilities), they then physically interact with the device (limited by psychomotor skills) this process is illustrated in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Older adults are major users of such devices and are a population significantly increasing in size.This group presents challenges due to the wide spectrum of capabilities and attitudes towards technology.The fit between capabilities of the user and demands of the device can be optimised in a process called Human Centred Design.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering and Informatics, Department Electrical & Electronic Engineering, NUI Galway, University Road, Galway, Ireland. rich1874@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Connected health devices are generally designed for unsupervised use, by non-healthcare professionals, facilitating independent control of the individuals own healthcare. Older adults are major users of such devices and are a population significantly increasing in size. This group presents challenges due to the wide spectrum of capabilities and attitudes towards technology. The fit between capabilities of the user and demands of the device can be optimised in a process called Human Centred Design. Here we review examples of some connected health devices chosen by random selection, assess older adult known capabilities and attitudes and finally make analytical recommendations for design approaches and design specifications.

No MeSH data available.