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Biomimetic strategies for sensing biological species.

Hussain M, Wackerlig J, Lieberzeit PA - Biosensors (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: A different strategy comprises of devising polymer coatings to change the biocompatibility of surfaces that can also be used to immobilized natural receptors/ligands and thus stabilize them.Rationally speaking, this leads to self-assembled monolayers closely resembling cell membranes, sometimes also including bioreceptors.It mainly focuses on the literature published since 2005.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, A-1090, Vienna, Austria; E-Mails: munawar_arif@hotmail.com (M.H.); judith.maehner@univie.ac.at (J.W.).

ABSTRACT
The starting point of modern biosensing was the application of actual biological species for recognition. Increasing understanding of the principles underlying such recognition (and biofunctionality in general), however, has triggered a dynamic field in chemistry and materials sciences that aims at joining the best of two worlds by combining concepts derived from nature with the processability of manmade materials, e.g., sensitivity and ruggedness. This review covers different biomimetic strategies leading to highly selective (bio)chemical sensors: the first section covers molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) that attempt to generate a fully artificial, macromolecular mold of a species in order to detect it selectively. A different strategy comprises of devising polymer coatings to change the biocompatibility of surfaces that can also be used to immobilized natural receptors/ligands and thus stabilize them. Rationally speaking, this leads to self-assembled monolayers closely resembling cell membranes, sometimes also including bioreceptors. Finally, this review will highlight some approaches to generate artificial analogs of natural recognition materials and biomimetic approaches in nanotechnology. It mainly focuses on the literature published since 2005.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic diagram for fabrication of a biomimetic membrane. Reprinted with permission from [46], © 2009 IEEE.
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biosensors-03-00089-f007: Schematic diagram for fabrication of a biomimetic membrane. Reprinted with permission from [46], © 2009 IEEE.

Mentions: The outstanding effect of nanoparticles (NP) has been demonstrated by Lee et al. [46] through developing an electrochemical sensor for NADH. As sketched in Figure 7, they modified a carbon electrode surface with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and electrodeposited a conjugated polymer (5,2′:5′,2′′-terthiophene-3′-carboxylic acid, TTCA), which acts as substrate for an artificial biomembrane. The specific bioaffinity properties were ensured by immobilizing ubiquinone (UQ10) onto the modified electrode simultaneously. Using cyclic voltammetry, a sensitivity of −0.04988 μA/mM for NADH with the modified electrode could be achieved.


Biomimetic strategies for sensing biological species.

Hussain M, Wackerlig J, Lieberzeit PA - Biosensors (Basel) (2013)

Schematic diagram for fabrication of a biomimetic membrane. Reprinted with permission from [46], © 2009 IEEE.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263596&req=5

biosensors-03-00089-f007: Schematic diagram for fabrication of a biomimetic membrane. Reprinted with permission from [46], © 2009 IEEE.
Mentions: The outstanding effect of nanoparticles (NP) has been demonstrated by Lee et al. [46] through developing an electrochemical sensor for NADH. As sketched in Figure 7, they modified a carbon electrode surface with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and electrodeposited a conjugated polymer (5,2′:5′,2′′-terthiophene-3′-carboxylic acid, TTCA), which acts as substrate for an artificial biomembrane. The specific bioaffinity properties were ensured by immobilizing ubiquinone (UQ10) onto the modified electrode simultaneously. Using cyclic voltammetry, a sensitivity of −0.04988 μA/mM for NADH with the modified electrode could be achieved.

Bottom Line: A different strategy comprises of devising polymer coatings to change the biocompatibility of surfaces that can also be used to immobilized natural receptors/ligands and thus stabilize them.Rationally speaking, this leads to self-assembled monolayers closely resembling cell membranes, sometimes also including bioreceptors.It mainly focuses on the literature published since 2005.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, A-1090, Vienna, Austria; E-Mails: munawar_arif@hotmail.com (M.H.); judith.maehner@univie.ac.at (J.W.).

ABSTRACT
The starting point of modern biosensing was the application of actual biological species for recognition. Increasing understanding of the principles underlying such recognition (and biofunctionality in general), however, has triggered a dynamic field in chemistry and materials sciences that aims at joining the best of two worlds by combining concepts derived from nature with the processability of manmade materials, e.g., sensitivity and ruggedness. This review covers different biomimetic strategies leading to highly selective (bio)chemical sensors: the first section covers molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) that attempt to generate a fully artificial, macromolecular mold of a species in order to detect it selectively. A different strategy comprises of devising polymer coatings to change the biocompatibility of surfaces that can also be used to immobilized natural receptors/ligands and thus stabilize them. Rationally speaking, this leads to self-assembled monolayers closely resembling cell membranes, sometimes also including bioreceptors. Finally, this review will highlight some approaches to generate artificial analogs of natural recognition materials and biomimetic approaches in nanotechnology. It mainly focuses on the literature published since 2005.

No MeSH data available.