Limits...
Biomimetic strategies for sensing biological species.

Hussain M, Wackerlig J, Lieberzeit PA - Biosensors (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: A different strategy comprises of devising polymer coatings to change the biocompatibility of surfaces that can also be used to immobilized natural receptors/ligands and thus stabilize them.Rationally speaking, this leads to self-assembled monolayers closely resembling cell membranes, sometimes also including bioreceptors.It mainly focuses on the literature published since 2005.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, A-1090, Vienna, Austria; E-Mails: munawar_arif@hotmail.com (M.H.); judith.maehner@univie.ac.at (J.W.).

ABSTRACT
The starting point of modern biosensing was the application of actual biological species for recognition. Increasing understanding of the principles underlying such recognition (and biofunctionality in general), however, has triggered a dynamic field in chemistry and materials sciences that aims at joining the best of two worlds by combining concepts derived from nature with the processability of manmade materials, e.g., sensitivity and ruggedness. This review covers different biomimetic strategies leading to highly selective (bio)chemical sensors: the first section covers molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) that attempt to generate a fully artificial, macromolecular mold of a species in order to detect it selectively. A different strategy comprises of devising polymer coatings to change the biocompatibility of surfaces that can also be used to immobilized natural receptors/ligands and thus stabilize them. Rationally speaking, this leads to self-assembled monolayers closely resembling cell membranes, sometimes also including bioreceptors. Finally, this review will highlight some approaches to generate artificial analogs of natural recognition materials and biomimetic approaches in nanotechnology. It mainly focuses on the literature published since 2005.

No MeSH data available.


Illustration of biomimetic SLB/SPRS set-up for the observation of membrane behavior. Reprinted with permission from [34], © 2009 IEEE.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263596&req=5

biosensors-03-00089-f004: Illustration of biomimetic SLB/SPRS set-up for the observation of membrane behavior. Reprinted with permission from [34], © 2009 IEEE.

Mentions: Self-assembly is one of the fundamental driving forces of life that leads, for example, to the phospholipid bilayers constituting cell membranes. The Langmuir–Blodgett technique is a way to build up artificial membranes. It makes it possible, for instance, to immobilize lipid bilayers (LB) that themselves can stabilize biomolecules to achieve biomimetic “cell membranes.” In contrast to the methods previously mentioned, the biomolecule is therefore immobilized in an artificial membrane that more closely resembles a natural one, as compared to a polymer thin film. Using this approach, Jiao et al. [33] demonstrated the use of non-inhibitory antibodies employed in a luminal derivative LB film for the reagentless detection of electrochemiluminescence (ECL) and antibody insertion. For model studies, choline oxidase activity has been detected, because catalytically H2O2 produced in situ can trigger ECL reaction in the sensing layer. In another approach of using supported lipid bilayers (SLB) mimicking natural structures, Choi et al. [34] demonstrated a novel biosensor for monitoring the behavior of cell membrane linking proteins in vitro by label-free surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPRS). Biomimetic sensor chips were fabricated by the fusion of unilamellar lipid vesicles on a hydrophilic Au surface for SPRS. This setup enables real-time measurements of protein aggregation. Figure 4 illustrates the proposed biomimetic SLB/SPES design for such measurements.


Biomimetic strategies for sensing biological species.

Hussain M, Wackerlig J, Lieberzeit PA - Biosensors (Basel) (2013)

Illustration of biomimetic SLB/SPRS set-up for the observation of membrane behavior. Reprinted with permission from [34], © 2009 IEEE.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263596&req=5

biosensors-03-00089-f004: Illustration of biomimetic SLB/SPRS set-up for the observation of membrane behavior. Reprinted with permission from [34], © 2009 IEEE.
Mentions: Self-assembly is one of the fundamental driving forces of life that leads, for example, to the phospholipid bilayers constituting cell membranes. The Langmuir–Blodgett technique is a way to build up artificial membranes. It makes it possible, for instance, to immobilize lipid bilayers (LB) that themselves can stabilize biomolecules to achieve biomimetic “cell membranes.” In contrast to the methods previously mentioned, the biomolecule is therefore immobilized in an artificial membrane that more closely resembles a natural one, as compared to a polymer thin film. Using this approach, Jiao et al. [33] demonstrated the use of non-inhibitory antibodies employed in a luminal derivative LB film for the reagentless detection of electrochemiluminescence (ECL) and antibody insertion. For model studies, choline oxidase activity has been detected, because catalytically H2O2 produced in situ can trigger ECL reaction in the sensing layer. In another approach of using supported lipid bilayers (SLB) mimicking natural structures, Choi et al. [34] demonstrated a novel biosensor for monitoring the behavior of cell membrane linking proteins in vitro by label-free surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPRS). Biomimetic sensor chips were fabricated by the fusion of unilamellar lipid vesicles on a hydrophilic Au surface for SPRS. This setup enables real-time measurements of protein aggregation. Figure 4 illustrates the proposed biomimetic SLB/SPES design for such measurements.

Bottom Line: A different strategy comprises of devising polymer coatings to change the biocompatibility of surfaces that can also be used to immobilized natural receptors/ligands and thus stabilize them.Rationally speaking, this leads to self-assembled monolayers closely resembling cell membranes, sometimes also including bioreceptors.It mainly focuses on the literature published since 2005.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, A-1090, Vienna, Austria; E-Mails: munawar_arif@hotmail.com (M.H.); judith.maehner@univie.ac.at (J.W.).

ABSTRACT
The starting point of modern biosensing was the application of actual biological species for recognition. Increasing understanding of the principles underlying such recognition (and biofunctionality in general), however, has triggered a dynamic field in chemistry and materials sciences that aims at joining the best of two worlds by combining concepts derived from nature with the processability of manmade materials, e.g., sensitivity and ruggedness. This review covers different biomimetic strategies leading to highly selective (bio)chemical sensors: the first section covers molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) that attempt to generate a fully artificial, macromolecular mold of a species in order to detect it selectively. A different strategy comprises of devising polymer coatings to change the biocompatibility of surfaces that can also be used to immobilized natural receptors/ligands and thus stabilize them. Rationally speaking, this leads to self-assembled monolayers closely resembling cell membranes, sometimes also including bioreceptors. Finally, this review will highlight some approaches to generate artificial analogs of natural recognition materials and biomimetic approaches in nanotechnology. It mainly focuses on the literature published since 2005.

No MeSH data available.