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The effect of 3-thiopheneacetic Acid in the polymerization of a conductive electrotextile for use in biosensor development.

McGraw SK, Alocilja E, Senecal A, Senecal K - Biosensors (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) if the inclusion of 3TAA in the polymerization process would have an effect on the availability of binding sites in the high-surface area electrotextile for biorecognition elements and (2) how the increase in the concentration of 3TAA would affect the physical characteristics of the coating, resistivity of the sample and availability of binding sites.It was found that the addition of 3TAA to the polymerization process resulted in an increase in the size of the polypyrrole coating, as well as the material resistivity and available binding sites for biorecognition elements.A polymer coated membrane sample containing a concentration within the range of 10-50 mg/mL of 3TAA was selected as the best for future biosensor work.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, 524 S. Shaw Lane, 115 Farrall Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. shannon.k.mcgraw2.civ@mail.mil.

ABSTRACT
Investigations were conducted to develop an electrotextile using a nonwoven polypropylene fiber platform conformally coated in a conductive, functionalized copolymer of polypyrrole and 3-thiopheneacetic acid (3TAA). The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) if the inclusion of 3TAA in the polymerization process would have an effect on the availability of binding sites in the high-surface area electrotextile for biorecognition elements and (2) how the increase in the concentration of 3TAA would affect the physical characteristics of the coating, resistivity of the sample and availability of binding sites. It was found that the addition of 3TAA to the polymerization process resulted in an increase in the size of the polypyrrole coating, as well as the material resistivity and available binding sites for biorecognition elements. These factors were used to determine which of the tested concentrations was best for biosensor development. A polymer coated membrane sample containing a concentration within the range of 10-50 mg/mL of 3TAA was selected as the best for future biosensor work.

No MeSH data available.


Change in sample resistivity based on increasing 3TAA concentrations, with error bars representing the standard error of the mean of each sample. The overall trend shows resistivity increasing as the concentration of 3TAA increases, starting at 1 mg/mL. The measured value for a concentration of 100 mg/mL has been excluded, due to a difference in scale, so that small changes among lower concentrations may be observed.
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biosensors-03-00286-f002: Change in sample resistivity based on increasing 3TAA concentrations, with error bars representing the standard error of the mean of each sample. The overall trend shows resistivity increasing as the concentration of 3TAA increases, starting at 1 mg/mL. The measured value for a concentration of 100 mg/mL has been excluded, due to a difference in scale, so that small changes among lower concentrations may be observed.

Mentions: As can be seen in Table 1, the measured average resistivities of the samples range from 3.4 to 1,587.4 Ω·cm. The samples containing 0, 1, 10, 20 and 50 mg/mL of 3TAA all have resistivity’s under 10 Ω·cm, with the samples composed from 0 and 1 mg/mL under 5 Ω·cm. A sharp increase is observed in the resistivities of the samples containing 100 mg/mL of 3TAA, with the average resistivity being over 150× larger than the sample containing 50 mg/mL. We hypothesize that at this concentration of 3TAA, self-polymerization occurs between the 3TAA molecules. Because the 3TAA is the non-conductive component of the coating, this results in the disproportional increase in material resistivity. A steady increase in average resistivity is observed as the concentration increased, starting at 1 mg/mL. A Student’s t-test (two tails, α = 0.05) shows a significant difference between all samples. The relationship between the concentration of 3TAA in each sample and the resistivity of the sample can be seen in Figure 2. The results in Figure 2 do not include the results for a concentration of 100 mg/mL of 3TAA, so that small changes between the lower concentrations could be observed.


The effect of 3-thiopheneacetic Acid in the polymerization of a conductive electrotextile for use in biosensor development.

McGraw SK, Alocilja E, Senecal A, Senecal K - Biosensors (Basel) (2013)

Change in sample resistivity based on increasing 3TAA concentrations, with error bars representing the standard error of the mean of each sample. The overall trend shows resistivity increasing as the concentration of 3TAA increases, starting at 1 mg/mL. The measured value for a concentration of 100 mg/mL has been excluded, due to a difference in scale, so that small changes among lower concentrations may be observed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263581&req=5

biosensors-03-00286-f002: Change in sample resistivity based on increasing 3TAA concentrations, with error bars representing the standard error of the mean of each sample. The overall trend shows resistivity increasing as the concentration of 3TAA increases, starting at 1 mg/mL. The measured value for a concentration of 100 mg/mL has been excluded, due to a difference in scale, so that small changes among lower concentrations may be observed.
Mentions: As can be seen in Table 1, the measured average resistivities of the samples range from 3.4 to 1,587.4 Ω·cm. The samples containing 0, 1, 10, 20 and 50 mg/mL of 3TAA all have resistivity’s under 10 Ω·cm, with the samples composed from 0 and 1 mg/mL under 5 Ω·cm. A sharp increase is observed in the resistivities of the samples containing 100 mg/mL of 3TAA, with the average resistivity being over 150× larger than the sample containing 50 mg/mL. We hypothesize that at this concentration of 3TAA, self-polymerization occurs between the 3TAA molecules. Because the 3TAA is the non-conductive component of the coating, this results in the disproportional increase in material resistivity. A steady increase in average resistivity is observed as the concentration increased, starting at 1 mg/mL. A Student’s t-test (two tails, α = 0.05) shows a significant difference between all samples. The relationship between the concentration of 3TAA in each sample and the resistivity of the sample can be seen in Figure 2. The results in Figure 2 do not include the results for a concentration of 100 mg/mL of 3TAA, so that small changes between the lower concentrations could be observed.

Bottom Line: The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) if the inclusion of 3TAA in the polymerization process would have an effect on the availability of binding sites in the high-surface area electrotextile for biorecognition elements and (2) how the increase in the concentration of 3TAA would affect the physical characteristics of the coating, resistivity of the sample and availability of binding sites.It was found that the addition of 3TAA to the polymerization process resulted in an increase in the size of the polypyrrole coating, as well as the material resistivity and available binding sites for biorecognition elements.A polymer coated membrane sample containing a concentration within the range of 10-50 mg/mL of 3TAA was selected as the best for future biosensor work.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, 524 S. Shaw Lane, 115 Farrall Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. shannon.k.mcgraw2.civ@mail.mil.

ABSTRACT
Investigations were conducted to develop an electrotextile using a nonwoven polypropylene fiber platform conformally coated in a conductive, functionalized copolymer of polypyrrole and 3-thiopheneacetic acid (3TAA). The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) if the inclusion of 3TAA in the polymerization process would have an effect on the availability of binding sites in the high-surface area electrotextile for biorecognition elements and (2) how the increase in the concentration of 3TAA would affect the physical characteristics of the coating, resistivity of the sample and availability of binding sites. It was found that the addition of 3TAA to the polymerization process resulted in an increase in the size of the polypyrrole coating, as well as the material resistivity and available binding sites for biorecognition elements. These factors were used to determine which of the tested concentrations was best for biosensor development. A polymer coated membrane sample containing a concentration within the range of 10-50 mg/mL of 3TAA was selected as the best for future biosensor work.

No MeSH data available.