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Microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors for analysis of living cells in vitro.

Wang J, Wu C, Hu N, Zhou J, Du L, Wang P - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring.In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology.Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biosensor National Special Lab, Key Lab for Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zheda Road No. 38, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China. wangjun-47@163.com.

ABSTRACT
Cellular biochemical parameters can be used to reveal the physiological and functional information of various cells. Due to demonstrated high accuracy and non-invasiveness, electrochemical detection methods have been used for cell-based investigation. When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring. In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology. This review aims to give an overview of the microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors, such as microelectrode arrays (MEA), the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) technique, and the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS). The details in their working principles, measurement systems, and applications in cell monitoring are covered. Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Metastatic cells that invade the confluent HUVEC layer and cause damage to the barrier integrity; (b) HUVEC layer challenged with the weakly metastatic G subline or the highly metastatic AT3 subline. The loss of resistance was due to the loss of integrity of the endothelial cell layer in response to the activities of the cancer cells.
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biosensors-02-00127-f017: (a) Metastatic cells that invade the confluent HUVEC layer and cause damage to the barrier integrity; (b) HUVEC layer challenged with the weakly metastatic G subline or the highly metastatic AT3 subline. The loss of resistance was due to the loss of integrity of the endothelial cell layer in response to the activities of the cancer cells.

Mentions: Migration also occurs during metastasis when some cancer cells migrate out of the initial tumor into the circulation and move to new locations, where they form a secondary tumor. As angiogenesis and invasion of cancer cells from the primary site into the surrounding area are essential for tumor development, assays have been developed to study these processes [99]. The ECIS-based assay used in cancer metastasis was first presented by Keese et al. [100], while the previous study was based on microscopic observations, where metastatic cells added over established endothelial cell layers were observed to attach and invade the cell layer. The extent and rate of drop in impedance could be correlated with the metastatic potential of cancer lines tested (Figure 17). For highly metastatic sublines, within an hour after being challenged, the impedance of the confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) layer was substantially reduced, while that caused by the weakly metastatic sublines was less pronounced.


Microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors for analysis of living cells in vitro.

Wang J, Wu C, Hu N, Zhou J, Du L, Wang P - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

(a) Metastatic cells that invade the confluent HUVEC layer and cause damage to the barrier integrity; (b) HUVEC layer challenged with the weakly metastatic G subline or the highly metastatic AT3 subline. The loss of resistance was due to the loss of integrity of the endothelial cell layer in response to the activities of the cancer cells.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263572&req=5

biosensors-02-00127-f017: (a) Metastatic cells that invade the confluent HUVEC layer and cause damage to the barrier integrity; (b) HUVEC layer challenged with the weakly metastatic G subline or the highly metastatic AT3 subline. The loss of resistance was due to the loss of integrity of the endothelial cell layer in response to the activities of the cancer cells.
Mentions: Migration also occurs during metastasis when some cancer cells migrate out of the initial tumor into the circulation and move to new locations, where they form a secondary tumor. As angiogenesis and invasion of cancer cells from the primary site into the surrounding area are essential for tumor development, assays have been developed to study these processes [99]. The ECIS-based assay used in cancer metastasis was first presented by Keese et al. [100], while the previous study was based on microscopic observations, where metastatic cells added over established endothelial cell layers were observed to attach and invade the cell layer. The extent and rate of drop in impedance could be correlated with the metastatic potential of cancer lines tested (Figure 17). For highly metastatic sublines, within an hour after being challenged, the impedance of the confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) layer was substantially reduced, while that caused by the weakly metastatic sublines was less pronounced.

Bottom Line: When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring.In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology.Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biosensor National Special Lab, Key Lab for Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zheda Road No. 38, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China. wangjun-47@163.com.

ABSTRACT
Cellular biochemical parameters can be used to reveal the physiological and functional information of various cells. Due to demonstrated high accuracy and non-invasiveness, electrochemical detection methods have been used for cell-based investigation. When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring. In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology. This review aims to give an overview of the microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors, such as microelectrode arrays (MEA), the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) technique, and the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS). The details in their working principles, measurement systems, and applications in cell monitoring are covered. Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus