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Microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors for analysis of living cells in vitro.

Wang J, Wu C, Hu N, Zhou J, Du L, Wang P - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring.In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology.Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biosensor National Special Lab, Key Lab for Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zheda Road No. 38, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China. wangjun-47@163.com.

ABSTRACT
Cellular biochemical parameters can be used to reveal the physiological and functional information of various cells. Due to demonstrated high accuracy and non-invasiveness, electrochemical detection methods have been used for cell-based investigation. When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring. In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology. This review aims to give an overview of the microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors, such as microelectrode arrays (MEA), the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) technique, and the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS). The details in their working principles, measurement systems, and applications in cell monitoring are covered. Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Attachment and spreading of NIH3T3 cells on FN and PLL coated ECIS sensors monitored by RT-CES system. The cell index was displayed with an arbitrary unit. Ten thousand cells were seeded per well of E-plate in triplicate. The experiment was carried out at least 6 times; (b) Attachment and spreading of NIH3T3 cells on FN- and PLL-coated chamber slides. (Reprinted from [95]. © 2005, with permission from SAGE Publications).
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biosensors-02-00127-f015: (a) Attachment and spreading of NIH3T3 cells on FN and PLL coated ECIS sensors monitored by RT-CES system. The cell index was displayed with an arbitrary unit. Ten thousand cells were seeded per well of E-plate in triplicate. The experiment was carried out at least 6 times; (b) Attachment and spreading of NIH3T3 cells on FN- and PLL-coated chamber slides. (Reprinted from [95]. © 2005, with permission from SAGE Publications).

Mentions: Figure 15 displays a typical investigation of cell adhesion and proliferation on different ECM-coated surfaces. NIH3T3 cells were cultured in the wells of ACEA E-plates, and the chamber coated with fibronectin (FN) or poly-L-lysine (PLL) was used as a control. At the same time, chamber slides were also coated with FN or PLL and the same numbers of cells were added to each well. The dynamic monitoring of cell-substrate impedance change due to cell adhesion and proliferation was completed by RT-CES system (by ACEA Biotech Inc.), while the real state of cells was determined by staining with rhodamine-phalloidin and visualized using an epifluorescent microscope. Figure 15(a) shows the relationship between cell-substrate impedance and the physiological state of cells (mainly cell number and morphology), while Figure 15(b) presents the quality of cultured cells on various ECMs. To determine the concentration-dependent effect of coated FN on the extent of cell adhesion and spreading, E-plates were coated with increasing concentrations of FN ranging from 0 to 20 µg/mL. Further results were presented in the literature [95].


Microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors for analysis of living cells in vitro.

Wang J, Wu C, Hu N, Zhou J, Du L, Wang P - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

(a) Attachment and spreading of NIH3T3 cells on FN and PLL coated ECIS sensors monitored by RT-CES system. The cell index was displayed with an arbitrary unit. Ten thousand cells were seeded per well of E-plate in triplicate. The experiment was carried out at least 6 times; (b) Attachment and spreading of NIH3T3 cells on FN- and PLL-coated chamber slides. (Reprinted from [95]. © 2005, with permission from SAGE Publications).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263572&req=5

biosensors-02-00127-f015: (a) Attachment and spreading of NIH3T3 cells on FN and PLL coated ECIS sensors monitored by RT-CES system. The cell index was displayed with an arbitrary unit. Ten thousand cells were seeded per well of E-plate in triplicate. The experiment was carried out at least 6 times; (b) Attachment and spreading of NIH3T3 cells on FN- and PLL-coated chamber slides. (Reprinted from [95]. © 2005, with permission from SAGE Publications).
Mentions: Figure 15 displays a typical investigation of cell adhesion and proliferation on different ECM-coated surfaces. NIH3T3 cells were cultured in the wells of ACEA E-plates, and the chamber coated with fibronectin (FN) or poly-L-lysine (PLL) was used as a control. At the same time, chamber slides were also coated with FN or PLL and the same numbers of cells were added to each well. The dynamic monitoring of cell-substrate impedance change due to cell adhesion and proliferation was completed by RT-CES system (by ACEA Biotech Inc.), while the real state of cells was determined by staining with rhodamine-phalloidin and visualized using an epifluorescent microscope. Figure 15(a) shows the relationship between cell-substrate impedance and the physiological state of cells (mainly cell number and morphology), while Figure 15(b) presents the quality of cultured cells on various ECMs. To determine the concentration-dependent effect of coated FN on the extent of cell adhesion and spreading, E-plates were coated with increasing concentrations of FN ranging from 0 to 20 µg/mL. Further results were presented in the literature [95].

Bottom Line: When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring.In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology.Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biosensor National Special Lab, Key Lab for Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zheda Road No. 38, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China. wangjun-47@163.com.

ABSTRACT
Cellular biochemical parameters can be used to reveal the physiological and functional information of various cells. Due to demonstrated high accuracy and non-invasiveness, electrochemical detection methods have been used for cell-based investigation. When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring. In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology. This review aims to give an overview of the microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors, such as microelectrode arrays (MEA), the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) technique, and the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS). The details in their working principles, measurement systems, and applications in cell monitoring are covered. Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus