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Microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors for analysis of living cells in vitro.

Wang J, Wu C, Hu N, Zhou J, Du L, Wang P - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring.In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology.Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biosensor National Special Lab, Key Lab for Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zheda Road No. 38, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China. wangjun-47@163.com.

ABSTRACT
Cellular biochemical parameters can be used to reveal the physiological and functional information of various cells. Due to demonstrated high accuracy and non-invasiveness, electrochemical detection methods have been used for cell-based investigation. When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring. In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology. This review aims to give an overview of the microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors, such as microelectrode arrays (MEA), the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) technique, and the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS). The details in their working principles, measurement systems, and applications in cell monitoring are covered. Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The schematic diagram of LAPS as a cell-based biosensor. (a) Working principle of LAPS; (b) Characteristic S-shaped curves.
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biosensors-02-00127-f006: The schematic diagram of LAPS as a cell-based biosensor. (a) Working principle of LAPS; (b) Characteristic S-shaped curves.

Mentions: LAPS is a potentiometric semiconductor device that could have an EIS structure or an electrolyte-metal-insulator-semiconductor (EMIS) structure, as shown in Figure 6. Generally, it has the layer sequence of an Si/SiO2/sensitive layer. An external DC bias voltage is applied to form an accumulation layer, a depletion layer or an inversion layer at the interface of insulator (SiO2) and semiconductor (Si). When an AC modulated light illuminates the LAPS chip, the semiconductor absorbs energy, leads to energy band transition and produces electron-hole pairs. Electron and hole would combine soon and photocurrent cannot be detected by peripheral circuit without light illumination. When LAPS is biased in depletion, an internal electric field is produced across the depletion layer, and the width of the depletion layer is a function of the local surface potential. When a modulated light illuminates the bulk silicon, light induced charge carriers are separated by the internal electric field and thus photocurrent can be detected by the peripheral circuit. The amplitude of the photocurrent depends on the local surface potential. Therefore, by detecting the photocurrent of LAPS, local surface potential can be obtained [27].


Microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors for analysis of living cells in vitro.

Wang J, Wu C, Hu N, Zhou J, Du L, Wang P - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

The schematic diagram of LAPS as a cell-based biosensor. (a) Working principle of LAPS; (b) Characteristic S-shaped curves.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263572&req=5

biosensors-02-00127-f006: The schematic diagram of LAPS as a cell-based biosensor. (a) Working principle of LAPS; (b) Characteristic S-shaped curves.
Mentions: LAPS is a potentiometric semiconductor device that could have an EIS structure or an electrolyte-metal-insulator-semiconductor (EMIS) structure, as shown in Figure 6. Generally, it has the layer sequence of an Si/SiO2/sensitive layer. An external DC bias voltage is applied to form an accumulation layer, a depletion layer or an inversion layer at the interface of insulator (SiO2) and semiconductor (Si). When an AC modulated light illuminates the LAPS chip, the semiconductor absorbs energy, leads to energy band transition and produces electron-hole pairs. Electron and hole would combine soon and photocurrent cannot be detected by peripheral circuit without light illumination. When LAPS is biased in depletion, an internal electric field is produced across the depletion layer, and the width of the depletion layer is a function of the local surface potential. When a modulated light illuminates the bulk silicon, light induced charge carriers are separated by the internal electric field and thus photocurrent can be detected by the peripheral circuit. The amplitude of the photocurrent depends on the local surface potential. Therefore, by detecting the photocurrent of LAPS, local surface potential can be obtained [27].

Bottom Line: When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring.In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology.Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biosensor National Special Lab, Key Lab for Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zheda Road No. 38, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China. wangjun-47@163.com.

ABSTRACT
Cellular biochemical parameters can be used to reveal the physiological and functional information of various cells. Due to demonstrated high accuracy and non-invasiveness, electrochemical detection methods have been used for cell-based investigation. When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring. In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology. This review aims to give an overview of the microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors, such as microelectrode arrays (MEA), the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) technique, and the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS). The details in their working principles, measurement systems, and applications in cell monitoring are covered. Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus