Limits...
Using complementary acoustic and optical techniques for quantitative monitoring of biomolecular adsorption at interfaces.

Konradi R, Textor M, Reimhult E - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: In this tutorial review, different optical and acoustic evanescent techniques are used to illustrate how an understanding of the transducer principle of each technique can be exploited for further interpretation of hydrated and extended polymer and biological films.The case studies deal with representative examples of adsorption of protein films, polymer brushes and lipid membranes, and describe e.g., how to deal with strongly vs. weakly hydrated films, large conformational changes and ordered layers of biomolecules.The presented systems and methods are compared to other representative examples from the increasing literature on the subject.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BASF SE, Advanced Materials and Systems Research, D-67056 Ludwigshafen, Germany. rupert.konradi@basf.com.

ABSTRACT
The great wealth of different surface sensitive techniques used in biosensing, most of which claim to measure adsorbed mass, can at first glance look unnecessary. However, with each technique relying on a different transducer principle there is something to be gained from a comparison. In this tutorial review, different optical and acoustic evanescent techniques are used to illustrate how an understanding of the transducer principle of each technique can be exploited for further interpretation of hydrated and extended polymer and biological films. Some of the most commonly used surface sensitive biosensor techniques (quartz crystal microbalance, optical waveguide spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance) are briefly described and five case studies are presented to illustrate how different biosensing techniques can and often should be combined. The case studies deal with representative examples of adsorption of protein films, polymer brushes and lipid membranes, and describe e.g., how to deal with strongly vs. weakly hydrated films, large conformational changes and ordered layers of biomolecules. The presented systems and methods are compared to other representative examples from the increasing literature on the subject.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The mass measured by QCM (mVoigt) and SPR (mΔn) vs. for (a) vesicle to bilayer formation; (b) streptavidin binding and 2D-crystallization on top of a biotinylated lipid bilayer. Shown is also the difference between the two measured masses, attributed to dynamically coupled water (mwater). The masses are calculated with the iterative method described in the text. Also shown in both plots are the expected adsorption rates for mass-transport limited adsorption (mdiff. lim.). Adapted with permission from Reimhult et al. [14]. Anal. Chem. 2004, 76, 7211–7220. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263558&req=5

biosensors-02-00341-f010: The mass measured by QCM (mVoigt) and SPR (mΔn) vs. for (a) vesicle to bilayer formation; (b) streptavidin binding and 2D-crystallization on top of a biotinylated lipid bilayer. Shown is also the difference between the two measured masses, attributed to dynamically coupled water (mwater). The masses are calculated with the iterative method described in the text. Also shown in both plots are the expected adsorption rates for mass-transport limited adsorption (mdiff. lim.). Adapted with permission from Reimhult et al. [14]. Anal. Chem. 2004, 76, 7211–7220. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society.

Mentions: Figure 10 shows two examples of where this approach has been used: the SLB formation process and for streptavidin binding and possible crystallization on top of the biotinylated SLB [14]. The two processes are chosen for this demonstration, because the SLB formation represents a system undergoing a large structural transformation, while streptavidin is typical for a “simple” protein adsorption process, which is the type of process most often studied.


Using complementary acoustic and optical techniques for quantitative monitoring of biomolecular adsorption at interfaces.

Konradi R, Textor M, Reimhult E - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

The mass measured by QCM (mVoigt) and SPR (mΔn) vs. for (a) vesicle to bilayer formation; (b) streptavidin binding and 2D-crystallization on top of a biotinylated lipid bilayer. Shown is also the difference between the two measured masses, attributed to dynamically coupled water (mwater). The masses are calculated with the iterative method described in the text. Also shown in both plots are the expected adsorption rates for mass-transport limited adsorption (mdiff. lim.). Adapted with permission from Reimhult et al. [14]. Anal. Chem. 2004, 76, 7211–7220. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263558&req=5

biosensors-02-00341-f010: The mass measured by QCM (mVoigt) and SPR (mΔn) vs. for (a) vesicle to bilayer formation; (b) streptavidin binding and 2D-crystallization on top of a biotinylated lipid bilayer. Shown is also the difference between the two measured masses, attributed to dynamically coupled water (mwater). The masses are calculated with the iterative method described in the text. Also shown in both plots are the expected adsorption rates for mass-transport limited adsorption (mdiff. lim.). Adapted with permission from Reimhult et al. [14]. Anal. Chem. 2004, 76, 7211–7220. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society.
Mentions: Figure 10 shows two examples of where this approach has been used: the SLB formation process and for streptavidin binding and possible crystallization on top of the biotinylated SLB [14]. The two processes are chosen for this demonstration, because the SLB formation represents a system undergoing a large structural transformation, while streptavidin is typical for a “simple” protein adsorption process, which is the type of process most often studied.

Bottom Line: In this tutorial review, different optical and acoustic evanescent techniques are used to illustrate how an understanding of the transducer principle of each technique can be exploited for further interpretation of hydrated and extended polymer and biological films.The case studies deal with representative examples of adsorption of protein films, polymer brushes and lipid membranes, and describe e.g., how to deal with strongly vs. weakly hydrated films, large conformational changes and ordered layers of biomolecules.The presented systems and methods are compared to other representative examples from the increasing literature on the subject.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BASF SE, Advanced Materials and Systems Research, D-67056 Ludwigshafen, Germany. rupert.konradi@basf.com.

ABSTRACT
The great wealth of different surface sensitive techniques used in biosensing, most of which claim to measure adsorbed mass, can at first glance look unnecessary. However, with each technique relying on a different transducer principle there is something to be gained from a comparison. In this tutorial review, different optical and acoustic evanescent techniques are used to illustrate how an understanding of the transducer principle of each technique can be exploited for further interpretation of hydrated and extended polymer and biological films. Some of the most commonly used surface sensitive biosensor techniques (quartz crystal microbalance, optical waveguide spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance) are briefly described and five case studies are presented to illustrate how different biosensing techniques can and often should be combined. The case studies deal with representative examples of adsorption of protein films, polymer brushes and lipid membranes, and describe e.g., how to deal with strongly vs. weakly hydrated films, large conformational changes and ordered layers of biomolecules. The presented systems and methods are compared to other representative examples from the increasing literature on the subject.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus