Limits...
Water-soluble electrospun nanofibers as a method for on-chip reagent storage.

Dai M, Jin S, Nugen SR - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: This work demonstrates the ability to electrospin reagents into water-soluble nanofibers resulting in a stable on-chip enzyme storage format.Immediately following electrospinning, the activity peak for the HRP decreased by approximately 20%.The ability to store enzymes and other reagents on-chip in a rapidly dispersible format could reduce the assay steps required of an operator to perform.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Massachusetts, 102 Holdsworth Way, Amherst, MA 01003, USA. mdai@foodsci.umass.edu.

ABSTRACT
This work demonstrates the ability to electrospin reagents into water-soluble nanofibers resulting in a stable on-chip enzyme storage format. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanofibers were spun with incorporation of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the spun nanofibers was used to confirm the non-woven structure which had an average diameter of 155 ± 34 nm. The HRP containing fibers were tested for their change in activity following electrospinning and during storage. A colorimetric assay was used to characterize the activity of HRP by reaction with the nanofiber mats in a microtiter plate and monitoring the change in absorption over time. Immediately following electrospinning, the activity peak for the HRP decreased by approximately 20%. After a storage study over 280 days, 40% of the activity remained. In addition to activity, the fibers were observed to solubilize in the microfluidic chamber. The chromogenic 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine solution reacted immediately with the fibers as they passed through a microfluidic channel. The ability to store enzymes and other reagents on-chip in a rapidly dispersible format could reduce the assay steps required of an operator to perform.

No MeSH data available.


Images of electrospun nanofiber in microfluidic chip. The image demonstrates how a nanofiber mat can be incorporated into a microfluidic chip. The images are before (A) and after (B) 100μL of a 1-step TMB reaction solution was added. The color change was observed after approximately 60 s.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263557&req=5

biosensors-02-00388-f003: Images of electrospun nanofiber in microfluidic chip. The image demonstrates how a nanofiber mat can be incorporated into a microfluidic chip. The images are before (A) and after (B) 100μL of a 1-step TMB reaction solution was added. The color change was observed after approximately 60 s.

Mentions: Electrospun nanofiber mats in the microfluidic chip appeared white prior to the addition of the TMB solution Figure 3(A). After the addition of the TMB solution, the fiber dissolved and became transparent soon after the solution reached the white mat. After approximately 60 s, the mat turned blue and the solution passed through the microfluidic channel onto the absorbent pad Figure 3(B). This reaction time was significantly shorter than the results observed using the plate reader. After the solution passed through the nanofiber channel and onto the absorbent pad, there were no visible signs of the nanofiber remaining thus suggesting it was fully dissolved. Microfluidic chips were tested both immediately following fabrication and after storage in a room temperature desiccator for 45 days. Given the nature of the assay, it was not possible to visually quantify the enzyme activity of the nanofibers within the microfluidic chip.


Water-soluble electrospun nanofibers as a method for on-chip reagent storage.

Dai M, Jin S, Nugen SR - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Images of electrospun nanofiber in microfluidic chip. The image demonstrates how a nanofiber mat can be incorporated into a microfluidic chip. The images are before (A) and after (B) 100μL of a 1-step TMB reaction solution was added. The color change was observed after approximately 60 s.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263557&req=5

biosensors-02-00388-f003: Images of electrospun nanofiber in microfluidic chip. The image demonstrates how a nanofiber mat can be incorporated into a microfluidic chip. The images are before (A) and after (B) 100μL of a 1-step TMB reaction solution was added. The color change was observed after approximately 60 s.
Mentions: Electrospun nanofiber mats in the microfluidic chip appeared white prior to the addition of the TMB solution Figure 3(A). After the addition of the TMB solution, the fiber dissolved and became transparent soon after the solution reached the white mat. After approximately 60 s, the mat turned blue and the solution passed through the microfluidic channel onto the absorbent pad Figure 3(B). This reaction time was significantly shorter than the results observed using the plate reader. After the solution passed through the nanofiber channel and onto the absorbent pad, there were no visible signs of the nanofiber remaining thus suggesting it was fully dissolved. Microfluidic chips were tested both immediately following fabrication and after storage in a room temperature desiccator for 45 days. Given the nature of the assay, it was not possible to visually quantify the enzyme activity of the nanofibers within the microfluidic chip.

Bottom Line: This work demonstrates the ability to electrospin reagents into water-soluble nanofibers resulting in a stable on-chip enzyme storage format.Immediately following electrospinning, the activity peak for the HRP decreased by approximately 20%.The ability to store enzymes and other reagents on-chip in a rapidly dispersible format could reduce the assay steps required of an operator to perform.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Massachusetts, 102 Holdsworth Way, Amherst, MA 01003, USA. mdai@foodsci.umass.edu.

ABSTRACT
This work demonstrates the ability to electrospin reagents into water-soluble nanofibers resulting in a stable on-chip enzyme storage format. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanofibers were spun with incorporation of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the spun nanofibers was used to confirm the non-woven structure which had an average diameter of 155 ± 34 nm. The HRP containing fibers were tested for their change in activity following electrospinning and during storage. A colorimetric assay was used to characterize the activity of HRP by reaction with the nanofiber mats in a microtiter plate and monitoring the change in absorption over time. Immediately following electrospinning, the activity peak for the HRP decreased by approximately 20%. After a storage study over 280 days, 40% of the activity remained. In addition to activity, the fibers were observed to solubilize in the microfluidic chamber. The chromogenic 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine solution reacted immediately with the fibers as they passed through a microfluidic channel. The ability to store enzymes and other reagents on-chip in a rapidly dispersible format could reduce the assay steps required of an operator to perform.

No MeSH data available.