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Synthesis of a functionalized polypyrrole coated electrotextile for use in biosensors.

McGraw SK, Alocilja E, Senecal A, Senecal K - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: The effects of dopant inclusion and post-polymerization wash steps were also analyzed.The initial results show a nonwoven fiber matrix can be successfully coated in a conductive, functionalized polymer while still maintaining surface area and fiber durability.The immobilized avidin was then successfully used to capture biotin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, 524 S. Shaw Lane, 115 Farrall Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. andre.g.senecal.civ@mail.mil.

ABSTRACT
An electrotextile with a biosensing focus composed of conductive polymer coated microfibers that contain functional attachment sites for biorecognition elements was developed. Experiments were conducted to select a compound with a pendant functional group for inclusion in the polymer, a fiber platform, and polymerization solvent. The effects of dopant inclusion and post-polymerization wash steps were also analyzed. Finally, the successful attachment of avidin, which was then used to capture biotin, to the electrotextile was achieved. The initial results show a nonwoven fiber matrix can be successfully coated in a conductive, functionalized polymer while still maintaining surface area and fiber durability. A polypropylene fiber platform with a conductive polypyrrole coating using iron (III) chloride as an oxidant, water as a solvent, and 5-sulfosalicylic acid as a dopant exhibited the best coating consistency, material durability, and lowest resistance. Biological attachment of avidin was achieved on the fibers through the inclusion of a carboxyl functional group via 3-thiopheneacetic acid in the monomer. The immobilized avidin was then successfully used to capture biotin. This was confirmed through the use of fluorescent quantum dots and confocal microscopy. A preliminary electrochemical experiment using avidin for biotin detection was conducted. This technology will be extremely useful in the formation of electrotextiles for use in biosensor systems.

No MeSH data available.


SEM images of fibers with 3-COOH vs. 3TAA in polymer coating. (A) Nylon 6 fibers coated in polypyrrole with 3-COOH. (B) Nylon 6 fibers coated in polypyrrole with 3TAA. Both at 2,000× magnification.
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biosensors-02-00465-f001: SEM images of fibers with 3-COOH vs. 3TAA in polymer coating. (A) Nylon 6 fibers coated in polypyrrole with 3-COOH. (B) Nylon 6 fibers coated in polypyrrole with 3TAA. Both at 2,000× magnification.

Mentions: The inclusion of a pendant carboxyl functional group associated with the conductive polymer coating provides attachment sites for the covalent binding of antibodies to the fibers, giving a biosensor its ability to detect pathogens and specificity of capture [28]. The groups 3TAA and 3-COOH were evaluated as potential functional group additions in the electrotextile polymer. The SEM images of the samples can be seen in Figure 1 and the results can be seen in Table 1.


Synthesis of a functionalized polypyrrole coated electrotextile for use in biosensors.

McGraw SK, Alocilja E, Senecal A, Senecal K - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

SEM images of fibers with 3-COOH vs. 3TAA in polymer coating. (A) Nylon 6 fibers coated in polypyrrole with 3-COOH. (B) Nylon 6 fibers coated in polypyrrole with 3TAA. Both at 2,000× magnification.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263555&req=5

biosensors-02-00465-f001: SEM images of fibers with 3-COOH vs. 3TAA in polymer coating. (A) Nylon 6 fibers coated in polypyrrole with 3-COOH. (B) Nylon 6 fibers coated in polypyrrole with 3TAA. Both at 2,000× magnification.
Mentions: The inclusion of a pendant carboxyl functional group associated with the conductive polymer coating provides attachment sites for the covalent binding of antibodies to the fibers, giving a biosensor its ability to detect pathogens and specificity of capture [28]. The groups 3TAA and 3-COOH were evaluated as potential functional group additions in the electrotextile polymer. The SEM images of the samples can be seen in Figure 1 and the results can be seen in Table 1.

Bottom Line: The effects of dopant inclusion and post-polymerization wash steps were also analyzed.The initial results show a nonwoven fiber matrix can be successfully coated in a conductive, functionalized polymer while still maintaining surface area and fiber durability.The immobilized avidin was then successfully used to capture biotin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, 524 S. Shaw Lane, 115 Farrall Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. andre.g.senecal.civ@mail.mil.

ABSTRACT
An electrotextile with a biosensing focus composed of conductive polymer coated microfibers that contain functional attachment sites for biorecognition elements was developed. Experiments were conducted to select a compound with a pendant functional group for inclusion in the polymer, a fiber platform, and polymerization solvent. The effects of dopant inclusion and post-polymerization wash steps were also analyzed. Finally, the successful attachment of avidin, which was then used to capture biotin, to the electrotextile was achieved. The initial results show a nonwoven fiber matrix can be successfully coated in a conductive, functionalized polymer while still maintaining surface area and fiber durability. A polypropylene fiber platform with a conductive polypyrrole coating using iron (III) chloride as an oxidant, water as a solvent, and 5-sulfosalicylic acid as a dopant exhibited the best coating consistency, material durability, and lowest resistance. Biological attachment of avidin was achieved on the fibers through the inclusion of a carboxyl functional group via 3-thiopheneacetic acid in the monomer. The immobilized avidin was then successfully used to capture biotin. This was confirmed through the use of fluorescent quantum dots and confocal microscopy. A preliminary electrochemical experiment using avidin for biotin detection was conducted. This technology will be extremely useful in the formation of electrotextiles for use in biosensor systems.

No MeSH data available.