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Electrochemical biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of magnetically extracted bacterial pathogens.

Setterington EB, Alocilja EC - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Cyclic voltammetry is combined with immunomagnetic separation in a rapid method requiring approximately 1 h for presumptive positive/negative results.The presence of target cells significantly inhibits current flow between the electrically active c/sNPs and SPCE.This method has the potential to be adapted for a wide variety of target organisms and sample matrices, and to become a fully portable system for routine monitoring or emergency detection of bacterial pathogens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. ebs@msu.edu.

ABSTRACT
Biological defense and security applications demand rapid, sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens. This work presents a novel qualitative electrochemical detection technique which is applied to two representative bacterial pathogens, Bacillus cereus (as a surrogate for B. anthracis) and Escherichia coli O157:H7, resulting in detection limits of 40 CFU/mL and 6 CFU/mL, respectively, from pure culture. Cyclic voltammetry is combined with immunomagnetic separation in a rapid method requiring approximately 1 h for presumptive positive/negative results. An immunofunctionalized magnetic/polyaniline core/shell nano-particle (c/sNP) is employed to extract target cells from the sample solution and magnetically position them on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) sensor. The presence of target cells significantly inhibits current flow between the electrically active c/sNPs and SPCE. This method has the potential to be adapted for a wide variety of target organisms and sample matrices, and to become a fully portable system for routine monitoring or emergency detection of bacterial pathogens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean charge transfer values obtained in cyclic voltammetry of immuno-c/sNP-cell solutions: (a) B. cereus cell concentrations ranging from 4 to 3.9 × 102 CFU/mL (n = 3); (b) E. coli O157:H7 cell concentrations ranging from 6 CFU/mL to 5.9 × 104 CFU/mL (n = 3); and (c) B. cereus and E. coli results displayed together (n = 6). Error bars represent ± one standard deviation.
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biosensors-02-00015-f006: Mean charge transfer values obtained in cyclic voltammetry of immuno-c/sNP-cell solutions: (a) B. cereus cell concentrations ranging from 4 to 3.9 × 102 CFU/mL (n = 3); (b) E. coli O157:H7 cell concentrations ranging from 6 CFU/mL to 5.9 × 104 CFU/mL (n = 3); and (c) B. cereus and E. coli results displayed together (n = 6). Error bars represent ± one standard deviation.

Mentions: Figure 6 shows the mean ΔQ values for the same experiment that was depicted in the cyclic voltammograms in Figure 5. Error bars represent ±1 standard deviation (n = 3). For both bacteria, the differences in ΔQ values between concentration groups are statistically significant with 95% confidence (p = 0.0356 for B. cereus and p = 0.0001 for E. coli O157:H7) by a single-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA).


Electrochemical biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of magnetically extracted bacterial pathogens.

Setterington EB, Alocilja EC - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Mean charge transfer values obtained in cyclic voltammetry of immuno-c/sNP-cell solutions: (a) B. cereus cell concentrations ranging from 4 to 3.9 × 102 CFU/mL (n = 3); (b) E. coli O157:H7 cell concentrations ranging from 6 CFU/mL to 5.9 × 104 CFU/mL (n = 3); and (c) B. cereus and E. coli results displayed together (n = 6). Error bars represent ± one standard deviation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263547&req=5

biosensors-02-00015-f006: Mean charge transfer values obtained in cyclic voltammetry of immuno-c/sNP-cell solutions: (a) B. cereus cell concentrations ranging from 4 to 3.9 × 102 CFU/mL (n = 3); (b) E. coli O157:H7 cell concentrations ranging from 6 CFU/mL to 5.9 × 104 CFU/mL (n = 3); and (c) B. cereus and E. coli results displayed together (n = 6). Error bars represent ± one standard deviation.
Mentions: Figure 6 shows the mean ΔQ values for the same experiment that was depicted in the cyclic voltammograms in Figure 5. Error bars represent ±1 standard deviation (n = 3). For both bacteria, the differences in ΔQ values between concentration groups are statistically significant with 95% confidence (p = 0.0356 for B. cereus and p = 0.0001 for E. coli O157:H7) by a single-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA).

Bottom Line: Cyclic voltammetry is combined with immunomagnetic separation in a rapid method requiring approximately 1 h for presumptive positive/negative results.The presence of target cells significantly inhibits current flow between the electrically active c/sNPs and SPCE.This method has the potential to be adapted for a wide variety of target organisms and sample matrices, and to become a fully portable system for routine monitoring or emergency detection of bacterial pathogens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. ebs@msu.edu.

ABSTRACT
Biological defense and security applications demand rapid, sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens. This work presents a novel qualitative electrochemical detection technique which is applied to two representative bacterial pathogens, Bacillus cereus (as a surrogate for B. anthracis) and Escherichia coli O157:H7, resulting in detection limits of 40 CFU/mL and 6 CFU/mL, respectively, from pure culture. Cyclic voltammetry is combined with immunomagnetic separation in a rapid method requiring approximately 1 h for presumptive positive/negative results. An immunofunctionalized magnetic/polyaniline core/shell nano-particle (c/sNP) is employed to extract target cells from the sample solution and magnetically position them on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) sensor. The presence of target cells significantly inhibits current flow between the electrically active c/sNPs and SPCE. This method has the potential to be adapted for a wide variety of target organisms and sample matrices, and to become a fully portable system for routine monitoring or emergency detection of bacterial pathogens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus