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Electrochemical biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of magnetically extracted bacterial pathogens.

Setterington EB, Alocilja EC - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Cyclic voltammetry is combined with immunomagnetic separation in a rapid method requiring approximately 1 h for presumptive positive/negative results.The presence of target cells significantly inhibits current flow between the electrically active c/sNPs and SPCE.This method has the potential to be adapted for a wide variety of target organisms and sample matrices, and to become a fully portable system for routine monitoring or emergency detection of bacterial pathogens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. ebs@msu.edu.

ABSTRACT
Biological defense and security applications demand rapid, sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens. This work presents a novel qualitative electrochemical detection technique which is applied to two representative bacterial pathogens, Bacillus cereus (as a surrogate for B. anthracis) and Escherichia coli O157:H7, resulting in detection limits of 40 CFU/mL and 6 CFU/mL, respectively, from pure culture. Cyclic voltammetry is combined with immunomagnetic separation in a rapid method requiring approximately 1 h for presumptive positive/negative results. An immunofunctionalized magnetic/polyaniline core/shell nano-particle (c/sNP) is employed to extract target cells from the sample solution and magnetically position them on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) sensor. The presence of target cells significantly inhibits current flow between the electrically active c/sNPs and SPCE. This method has the potential to be adapted for a wide variety of target organisms and sample matrices, and to become a fully portable system for routine monitoring or emergency detection of bacterial pathogens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cyclic voltammograms of (a) 1 mg/mL c/sNPs; (b) 1 mg/mL immuno-c/sNPs; (c) 0.1 mg/mL polyaniline nanoparticles, each suspended in 0.1 M HCl solution; and (d) 0.1 M HCl solution alone.
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biosensors-02-00015-f003: Cyclic voltammograms of (a) 1 mg/mL c/sNPs; (b) 1 mg/mL immuno-c/sNPs; (c) 0.1 mg/mL polyaniline nanoparticles, each suspended in 0.1 M HCl solution; and (d) 0.1 M HCl solution alone.

Mentions: Cyclic voltammograms of pure (nonmagnetic) polyaniline nanoparticles, synthesized c/sNPs, and immuno-c/sNPs, each in 0.1 M HCl solution, are shown in Figure 3. The same tests performed in PBS buffer resulted in much lower current responses (data not shown), due to lack of polyaniline doping.


Electrochemical biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of magnetically extracted bacterial pathogens.

Setterington EB, Alocilja EC - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Cyclic voltammograms of (a) 1 mg/mL c/sNPs; (b) 1 mg/mL immuno-c/sNPs; (c) 0.1 mg/mL polyaniline nanoparticles, each suspended in 0.1 M HCl solution; and (d) 0.1 M HCl solution alone.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263547&req=5

biosensors-02-00015-f003: Cyclic voltammograms of (a) 1 mg/mL c/sNPs; (b) 1 mg/mL immuno-c/sNPs; (c) 0.1 mg/mL polyaniline nanoparticles, each suspended in 0.1 M HCl solution; and (d) 0.1 M HCl solution alone.
Mentions: Cyclic voltammograms of pure (nonmagnetic) polyaniline nanoparticles, synthesized c/sNPs, and immuno-c/sNPs, each in 0.1 M HCl solution, are shown in Figure 3. The same tests performed in PBS buffer resulted in much lower current responses (data not shown), due to lack of polyaniline doping.

Bottom Line: Cyclic voltammetry is combined with immunomagnetic separation in a rapid method requiring approximately 1 h for presumptive positive/negative results.The presence of target cells significantly inhibits current flow between the electrically active c/sNPs and SPCE.This method has the potential to be adapted for a wide variety of target organisms and sample matrices, and to become a fully portable system for routine monitoring or emergency detection of bacterial pathogens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. ebs@msu.edu.

ABSTRACT
Biological defense and security applications demand rapid, sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens. This work presents a novel qualitative electrochemical detection technique which is applied to two representative bacterial pathogens, Bacillus cereus (as a surrogate for B. anthracis) and Escherichia coli O157:H7, resulting in detection limits of 40 CFU/mL and 6 CFU/mL, respectively, from pure culture. Cyclic voltammetry is combined with immunomagnetic separation in a rapid method requiring approximately 1 h for presumptive positive/negative results. An immunofunctionalized magnetic/polyaniline core/shell nano-particle (c/sNP) is employed to extract target cells from the sample solution and magnetically position them on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) sensor. The presence of target cells significantly inhibits current flow between the electrically active c/sNPs and SPCE. This method has the potential to be adapted for a wide variety of target organisms and sample matrices, and to become a fully portable system for routine monitoring or emergency detection of bacterial pathogens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus