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Fabrication of biocompatible, vibrational magnetoelastic materials for controlling cellular adhesion.

Holmes HR, Tan EL, Ong KG, Rajachar RM - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: However, since ME materials are not inherently biocompatible, surface modifications are needed for their implementation in biological settings.In vitro cytotoxicity measurement and characterization of the vibrational behavior of the ME materials showed that Parylene-C coatings of 10 µm or greater could prevent hydrolytic degradation without sacrificing the vibrational behavior of the ME material.This work allows for long-term durability and functionality of ME materials in an aqueous and biological environment and makes the potential use of this technology in monitoring and modulating cellular behavior at the surface of implantable devices feasible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA. hrholmes@mtu.edu.

ABSTRACT
This paper describes the functionalization of magnetoelastic (ME) materials with Parylene-C coating to improve the surface reactivity to cellular response. Previous study has demonstrated that vibrating ME materials were capable of modulating cellular adhesion when activated by an externally applied AC magnetic field. However, since ME materials are not inherently biocompatible, surface modifications are needed for their implementation in biological settings. Here, the long-term stability of the ME material in an aqueous and biological environment is achieved by chemical-vapor deposition of a conformal Parylene-C layer, and further functionalized by methods of oxygen plasma etching and protein adsorption. In vitro cytotoxicity measurement and characterization of the vibrational behavior of the ME materials showed that Parylene-C coatings of 10 µm or greater could prevent hydrolytic degradation without sacrificing the vibrational behavior of the ME material. This work allows for long-term durability and functionality of ME materials in an aqueous and biological environment and makes the potential use of this technology in monitoring and modulating cellular behavior at the surface of implantable devices feasible.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Treatment with oxygen plasma was shown to improve cellular adhesion on Parylene-C coated ME material. Fluorescent images for 0.5 and 1 min plasma-treated samples (A & B) revealed greater levels of fibroblast adhesion than samples that were plasma-treated for 3 and 5 min (C & D). (E) Untreated Parylene-C controls showed little or no evidence of cell adhesion.
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biosensors-02-00057-f004: Treatment with oxygen plasma was shown to improve cellular adhesion on Parylene-C coated ME material. Fluorescent images for 0.5 and 1 min plasma-treated samples (A & B) revealed greater levels of fibroblast adhesion than samples that were plasma-treated for 3 and 5 min (C & D). (E) Untreated Parylene-C controls showed little or no evidence of cell adhesion.

Mentions: Plasma etching was shown to affect Parylene-C coating by opening and removing the benzene ring following the sequential formation of a hydroxyl then peroxy radical at the ethyl carbon site [18]. Through this processing technique, only the outer most layers of the film will possess modified surface properties [21,27]. Here, Parylene-C coated ME materials treated with different duration of plasma etching (0.5, 1, 3, and 5 min) were used to evaluate the cell reactivity to plasma-etched surface. As shown in Figure 4, fluorescent images of cells cultured on Parylene-C coated ME materials demonstrated that short plasma treatments (0.5 and 1 min) could improve the cellular adhesion.


Fabrication of biocompatible, vibrational magnetoelastic materials for controlling cellular adhesion.

Holmes HR, Tan EL, Ong KG, Rajachar RM - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Treatment with oxygen plasma was shown to improve cellular adhesion on Parylene-C coated ME material. Fluorescent images for 0.5 and 1 min plasma-treated samples (A & B) revealed greater levels of fibroblast adhesion than samples that were plasma-treated for 3 and 5 min (C & D). (E) Untreated Parylene-C controls showed little or no evidence of cell adhesion.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263540&req=5

biosensors-02-00057-f004: Treatment with oxygen plasma was shown to improve cellular adhesion on Parylene-C coated ME material. Fluorescent images for 0.5 and 1 min plasma-treated samples (A & B) revealed greater levels of fibroblast adhesion than samples that were plasma-treated for 3 and 5 min (C & D). (E) Untreated Parylene-C controls showed little or no evidence of cell adhesion.
Mentions: Plasma etching was shown to affect Parylene-C coating by opening and removing the benzene ring following the sequential formation of a hydroxyl then peroxy radical at the ethyl carbon site [18]. Through this processing technique, only the outer most layers of the film will possess modified surface properties [21,27]. Here, Parylene-C coated ME materials treated with different duration of plasma etching (0.5, 1, 3, and 5 min) were used to evaluate the cell reactivity to plasma-etched surface. As shown in Figure 4, fluorescent images of cells cultured on Parylene-C coated ME materials demonstrated that short plasma treatments (0.5 and 1 min) could improve the cellular adhesion.

Bottom Line: However, since ME materials are not inherently biocompatible, surface modifications are needed for their implementation in biological settings.In vitro cytotoxicity measurement and characterization of the vibrational behavior of the ME materials showed that Parylene-C coatings of 10 µm or greater could prevent hydrolytic degradation without sacrificing the vibrational behavior of the ME material.This work allows for long-term durability and functionality of ME materials in an aqueous and biological environment and makes the potential use of this technology in monitoring and modulating cellular behavior at the surface of implantable devices feasible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA. hrholmes@mtu.edu.

ABSTRACT
This paper describes the functionalization of magnetoelastic (ME) materials with Parylene-C coating to improve the surface reactivity to cellular response. Previous study has demonstrated that vibrating ME materials were capable of modulating cellular adhesion when activated by an externally applied AC magnetic field. However, since ME materials are not inherently biocompatible, surface modifications are needed for their implementation in biological settings. Here, the long-term stability of the ME material in an aqueous and biological environment is achieved by chemical-vapor deposition of a conformal Parylene-C layer, and further functionalized by methods of oxygen plasma etching and protein adsorption. In vitro cytotoxicity measurement and characterization of the vibrational behavior of the ME materials showed that Parylene-C coatings of 10 µm or greater could prevent hydrolytic degradation without sacrificing the vibrational behavior of the ME material. This work allows for long-term durability and functionality of ME materials in an aqueous and biological environment and makes the potential use of this technology in monitoring and modulating cellular behavior at the surface of implantable devices feasible.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus