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Fabrication of biocompatible, vibrational magnetoelastic materials for controlling cellular adhesion.

Holmes HR, Tan EL, Ong KG, Rajachar RM - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: However, since ME materials are not inherently biocompatible, surface modifications are needed for their implementation in biological settings.In vitro cytotoxicity measurement and characterization of the vibrational behavior of the ME materials showed that Parylene-C coatings of 10 µm or greater could prevent hydrolytic degradation without sacrificing the vibrational behavior of the ME material.This work allows for long-term durability and functionality of ME materials in an aqueous and biological environment and makes the potential use of this technology in monitoring and modulating cellular behavior at the surface of implantable devices feasible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA. hrholmes@mtu.edu.

ABSTRACT
This paper describes the functionalization of magnetoelastic (ME) materials with Parylene-C coating to improve the surface reactivity to cellular response. Previous study has demonstrated that vibrating ME materials were capable of modulating cellular adhesion when activated by an externally applied AC magnetic field. However, since ME materials are not inherently biocompatible, surface modifications are needed for their implementation in biological settings. Here, the long-term stability of the ME material in an aqueous and biological environment is achieved by chemical-vapor deposition of a conformal Parylene-C layer, and further functionalized by methods of oxygen plasma etching and protein adsorption. In vitro cytotoxicity measurement and characterization of the vibrational behavior of the ME materials showed that Parylene-C coatings of 10 µm or greater could prevent hydrolytic degradation without sacrificing the vibrational behavior of the ME material. This work allows for long-term durability and functionality of ME materials in an aqueous and biological environment and makes the potential use of this technology in monitoring and modulating cellular behavior at the surface of implantable devices feasible.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Additional mass loading as a result of Parylene-C coating reduced the resonant frequency, resonant amplitude, and resonant quality. Note that each resonant behavior exhibited standard deviation of less that 5%.
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biosensors-02-00057-f003: Additional mass loading as a result of Parylene-C coating reduced the resonant frequency, resonant amplitude, and resonant quality. Note that each resonant behavior exhibited standard deviation of less that 5%.

Mentions: The additional mass loading upon deposition of Parylene-C coating is shown in Table 1. The effect of mass loading as a result of an additional Parylene-C coating on the resonance behavior of the ME material is shown in Figure 3. The application of Parylene-C coatings to ME materials dampened the vibration, and hence the secondary field response. When the Parylene-C coating thickness was increased from 0 to 20 µm, the additional mass loading reduced the maximum secondary field of ME material, A, from 0.67 to 0.33 V, a reduction of 50% on the resonant frequency. This observation is consistent with previous studies where additional weight on ME material would subsequently increase the resistance of ME vibration, hence, lowering the resonant frequency of the material. In addition, the resonant frequency and quality were reduced as a function of addition mass loading. While there was a reduction in resonant amplitude and quality, the ME materials were still able to retain their magnetostrictive properties when subjected to Parylene-C coating. The conformity of this trend also shows that the Parylene-C coating has stably integrated with the dynamic ME material substrate.


Fabrication of biocompatible, vibrational magnetoelastic materials for controlling cellular adhesion.

Holmes HR, Tan EL, Ong KG, Rajachar RM - Biosensors (Basel) (2012)

Additional mass loading as a result of Parylene-C coating reduced the resonant frequency, resonant amplitude, and resonant quality. Note that each resonant behavior exhibited standard deviation of less that 5%.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263540&req=5

biosensors-02-00057-f003: Additional mass loading as a result of Parylene-C coating reduced the resonant frequency, resonant amplitude, and resonant quality. Note that each resonant behavior exhibited standard deviation of less that 5%.
Mentions: The additional mass loading upon deposition of Parylene-C coating is shown in Table 1. The effect of mass loading as a result of an additional Parylene-C coating on the resonance behavior of the ME material is shown in Figure 3. The application of Parylene-C coatings to ME materials dampened the vibration, and hence the secondary field response. When the Parylene-C coating thickness was increased from 0 to 20 µm, the additional mass loading reduced the maximum secondary field of ME material, A, from 0.67 to 0.33 V, a reduction of 50% on the resonant frequency. This observation is consistent with previous studies where additional weight on ME material would subsequently increase the resistance of ME vibration, hence, lowering the resonant frequency of the material. In addition, the resonant frequency and quality were reduced as a function of addition mass loading. While there was a reduction in resonant amplitude and quality, the ME materials were still able to retain their magnetostrictive properties when subjected to Parylene-C coating. The conformity of this trend also shows that the Parylene-C coating has stably integrated with the dynamic ME material substrate.

Bottom Line: However, since ME materials are not inherently biocompatible, surface modifications are needed for their implementation in biological settings.In vitro cytotoxicity measurement and characterization of the vibrational behavior of the ME materials showed that Parylene-C coatings of 10 µm or greater could prevent hydrolytic degradation without sacrificing the vibrational behavior of the ME material.This work allows for long-term durability and functionality of ME materials in an aqueous and biological environment and makes the potential use of this technology in monitoring and modulating cellular behavior at the surface of implantable devices feasible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA. hrholmes@mtu.edu.

ABSTRACT
This paper describes the functionalization of magnetoelastic (ME) materials with Parylene-C coating to improve the surface reactivity to cellular response. Previous study has demonstrated that vibrating ME materials were capable of modulating cellular adhesion when activated by an externally applied AC magnetic field. However, since ME materials are not inherently biocompatible, surface modifications are needed for their implementation in biological settings. Here, the long-term stability of the ME material in an aqueous and biological environment is achieved by chemical-vapor deposition of a conformal Parylene-C layer, and further functionalized by methods of oxygen plasma etching and protein adsorption. In vitro cytotoxicity measurement and characterization of the vibrational behavior of the ME materials showed that Parylene-C coatings of 10 µm or greater could prevent hydrolytic degradation without sacrificing the vibrational behavior of the ME material. This work allows for long-term durability and functionality of ME materials in an aqueous and biological environment and makes the potential use of this technology in monitoring and modulating cellular behavior at the surface of implantable devices feasible.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus