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Miniaturized quantum semiconductor surface plasmon resonance platform for detection of biological molecules.

Lepage D, Dubowski JJ - Biosensors (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: The SPR technology is already commonly used for biochemical characterization in pharmaceutical industries, but the reduction of the distance between the SP exciting source and the biosensing platform to a few hundreds of nanometers is an innovative approach enabling us to achieve an ultimate miniaturization of the device.We evaluate the signal quality of this nanophotonic QW-SPR device using hyperspectral-imaging technology, and we compare its performance with that of a standard prism-based commercial system.With an innovative conical method of SPR data collection, we demonstrate that individually collected SPR scan, each in less than 2.2 s, yield a resolution of the detection at 1.5 × 10-6 RIU.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Quantum Semiconductors and Photon-based BioNanotechnology, Interdisciplinary Institute for Technological Innovation (3IT), Faculty of Engineering, Université de Sherbrooke, 3000 boul. de l'Université, Sherbrooke, QC J1K 0A5, Canada. dominic.lepage@usherbrooke.ca.

ABSTRACT
The concept of a portable, inexpensive and semi-automated biosensing platform, or lab-on-a-chip, is a vision shared by many researchers and venture industries. Under this scope, we have investigated the application of optical emission from quantum well (QW) microstructures for monitoring surface phenomena on gold layers remaining in proximity (<300 nm) with QW microstructures. The uncollimated QW radiation excites surface plasmons (SP) and through the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect allows for detection of small perturbation in the density surface adsorbates. The SPR technology is already commonly used for biochemical characterization in pharmaceutical industries, but the reduction of the distance between the SP exciting source and the biosensing platform to a few hundreds of nanometers is an innovative approach enabling us to achieve an ultimate miniaturization of the device. We evaluate the signal quality of this nanophotonic QW-SPR device using hyperspectral-imaging technology, and we compare its performance with that of a standard prism-based commercial system. Two standard biochemical agents are employed for this characterization study: bovine serum albumin and inactivated influenza A virus. With an innovative conical method of SPR data collection, we demonstrate that individually collected SPR scan, each in less than 2.2 s, yield a resolution of the detection at 1.5 × 10-6 RIU.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The dispersion relation of the SPR is directly projected on the microscope. The result shows a clear diffraction of SPs, from the ±1st diffraction orders. Measuring the distance between the resonances provides direct information on the surface conditions. In this case, the quality of the signal as a function of E-ky depends on the luminescence intensity of the QW [9,13].
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biosensors-03-00201-f003: The dispersion relation of the SPR is directly projected on the microscope. The result shows a clear diffraction of SPs, from the ±1st diffraction orders. Measuring the distance between the resonances provides direct information on the surface conditions. In this case, the quality of the signal as a function of E-ky depends on the luminescence intensity of the QW [9,13].

Mentions: The SPs are diffracted by the surface corrugation and projected in the far field of the microscope. The image shown in Figure 3 presents the measured photonic intensity distribution as a function of projected wavevector kx in the E-ky plane [13]. The peak intensities correspond directly to a cross-section of the SPR dispersion relation. From this, the SPR shifts can be monitored by tracking the distances between the two curves, in kx, as a function of the surface biochemical events. The quantification of the biodetection capabilities of this architecture under real conditions was firstly accomplished using 2% bovine serum albumin (BSA) in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutions. Secondly, we examined a specific immobilization of the gamma radiation inactivated H3N2 influenza strain. These viral capsids were trapped with an architecture consisting of a layer of biotinylated polyclonal IAV-H3N2 antibodies attached to neutravidin physisorbed on the Au surface. For the specific immobilization of IAV H3N2, a 200 µg/mL neutravidin solution in PBS was injected on the substrate surface, left to physisorb for 160 min and rinsed with the PBS buffer. A 100 µg/mL solution of biotinylated polyclonal IAV H3N2 antibodies was then injected and left to react with the neutravidin for 160 min. At this stage, the surface was ready to receive a 40 µg/mL solution containing gamma radiation inactivated IAV. A negative test was carried by introducing the IAV H1N1 strain and measuring its surficial shift, ΔS. Then the IAV H3N2 strain, of identical concentration, was injected and ΔS measured for positive identification. For both strains, the solutions were left for 60 min to react with the antibody functionalized Au surface.


Miniaturized quantum semiconductor surface plasmon resonance platform for detection of biological molecules.

Lepage D, Dubowski JJ - Biosensors (Basel) (2013)

The dispersion relation of the SPR is directly projected on the microscope. The result shows a clear diffraction of SPs, from the ±1st diffraction orders. Measuring the distance between the resonances provides direct information on the surface conditions. In this case, the quality of the signal as a function of E-ky depends on the luminescence intensity of the QW [9,13].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263536&req=5

biosensors-03-00201-f003: The dispersion relation of the SPR is directly projected on the microscope. The result shows a clear diffraction of SPs, from the ±1st diffraction orders. Measuring the distance between the resonances provides direct information on the surface conditions. In this case, the quality of the signal as a function of E-ky depends on the luminescence intensity of the QW [9,13].
Mentions: The SPs are diffracted by the surface corrugation and projected in the far field of the microscope. The image shown in Figure 3 presents the measured photonic intensity distribution as a function of projected wavevector kx in the E-ky plane [13]. The peak intensities correspond directly to a cross-section of the SPR dispersion relation. From this, the SPR shifts can be monitored by tracking the distances between the two curves, in kx, as a function of the surface biochemical events. The quantification of the biodetection capabilities of this architecture under real conditions was firstly accomplished using 2% bovine serum albumin (BSA) in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solutions. Secondly, we examined a specific immobilization of the gamma radiation inactivated H3N2 influenza strain. These viral capsids were trapped with an architecture consisting of a layer of biotinylated polyclonal IAV-H3N2 antibodies attached to neutravidin physisorbed on the Au surface. For the specific immobilization of IAV H3N2, a 200 µg/mL neutravidin solution in PBS was injected on the substrate surface, left to physisorb for 160 min and rinsed with the PBS buffer. A 100 µg/mL solution of biotinylated polyclonal IAV H3N2 antibodies was then injected and left to react with the neutravidin for 160 min. At this stage, the surface was ready to receive a 40 µg/mL solution containing gamma radiation inactivated IAV. A negative test was carried by introducing the IAV H1N1 strain and measuring its surficial shift, ΔS. Then the IAV H3N2 strain, of identical concentration, was injected and ΔS measured for positive identification. For both strains, the solutions were left for 60 min to react with the antibody functionalized Au surface.

Bottom Line: The SPR technology is already commonly used for biochemical characterization in pharmaceutical industries, but the reduction of the distance between the SP exciting source and the biosensing platform to a few hundreds of nanometers is an innovative approach enabling us to achieve an ultimate miniaturization of the device.We evaluate the signal quality of this nanophotonic QW-SPR device using hyperspectral-imaging technology, and we compare its performance with that of a standard prism-based commercial system.With an innovative conical method of SPR data collection, we demonstrate that individually collected SPR scan, each in less than 2.2 s, yield a resolution of the detection at 1.5 × 10-6 RIU.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Quantum Semiconductors and Photon-based BioNanotechnology, Interdisciplinary Institute for Technological Innovation (3IT), Faculty of Engineering, Université de Sherbrooke, 3000 boul. de l'Université, Sherbrooke, QC J1K 0A5, Canada. dominic.lepage@usherbrooke.ca.

ABSTRACT
The concept of a portable, inexpensive and semi-automated biosensing platform, or lab-on-a-chip, is a vision shared by many researchers and venture industries. Under this scope, we have investigated the application of optical emission from quantum well (QW) microstructures for monitoring surface phenomena on gold layers remaining in proximity (<300 nm) with QW microstructures. The uncollimated QW radiation excites surface plasmons (SP) and through the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect allows for detection of small perturbation in the density surface adsorbates. The SPR technology is already commonly used for biochemical characterization in pharmaceutical industries, but the reduction of the distance between the SP exciting source and the biosensing platform to a few hundreds of nanometers is an innovative approach enabling us to achieve an ultimate miniaturization of the device. We evaluate the signal quality of this nanophotonic QW-SPR device using hyperspectral-imaging technology, and we compare its performance with that of a standard prism-based commercial system. Two standard biochemical agents are employed for this characterization study: bovine serum albumin and inactivated influenza A virus. With an innovative conical method of SPR data collection, we demonstrate that individually collected SPR scan, each in less than 2.2 s, yield a resolution of the detection at 1.5 × 10-6 RIU.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus