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Miniaturized quantum semiconductor surface plasmon resonance platform for detection of biological molecules.

Lepage D, Dubowski JJ - Biosensors (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: The SPR technology is already commonly used for biochemical characterization in pharmaceutical industries, but the reduction of the distance between the SP exciting source and the biosensing platform to a few hundreds of nanometers is an innovative approach enabling us to achieve an ultimate miniaturization of the device.We evaluate the signal quality of this nanophotonic QW-SPR device using hyperspectral-imaging technology, and we compare its performance with that of a standard prism-based commercial system.With an innovative conical method of SPR data collection, we demonstrate that individually collected SPR scan, each in less than 2.2 s, yield a resolution of the detection at 1.5 × 10-6 RIU.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Quantum Semiconductors and Photon-based BioNanotechnology, Interdisciplinary Institute for Technological Innovation (3IT), Faculty of Engineering, Université de Sherbrooke, 3000 boul. de l'Université, Sherbrooke, QC J1K 0A5, Canada. dominic.lepage@usherbrooke.ca.

ABSTRACT
The concept of a portable, inexpensive and semi-automated biosensing platform, or lab-on-a-chip, is a vision shared by many researchers and venture industries. Under this scope, we have investigated the application of optical emission from quantum well (QW) microstructures for monitoring surface phenomena on gold layers remaining in proximity (<300 nm) with QW microstructures. The uncollimated QW radiation excites surface plasmons (SP) and through the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect allows for detection of small perturbation in the density surface adsorbates. The SPR technology is already commonly used for biochemical characterization in pharmaceutical industries, but the reduction of the distance between the SP exciting source and the biosensing platform to a few hundreds of nanometers is an innovative approach enabling us to achieve an ultimate miniaturization of the device. We evaluate the signal quality of this nanophotonic QW-SPR device using hyperspectral-imaging technology, and we compare its performance with that of a standard prism-based commercial system. Two standard biochemical agents are employed for this characterization study: bovine serum albumin and inactivated influenza A virus. With an innovative conical method of SPR data collection, we demonstrate that individually collected SPR scan, each in less than 2.2 s, yield a resolution of the detection at 1.5 × 10-6 RIU.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Working principle of the quantum well-surface plasmon resonance (QW-SPR) device. The SEM image presents a grazing angle view of a device sequentially exposed to solutions of neutravidin, biotinylated polyclonal IAV-H3N2 antibodies and capsids of IAV-H3N2. The Au grating is visible on the surface, under which a SiO2 layer is deposited atop the GaAs-AlGaAs QW. Inset: Broadband and uncollimated NIR light is emitted from the QW to couple a continuum of SP modes on the surface, since conditions for SPR are concurrently met for a range of E(kll). The propagating modes can then diffract, mainly through the ±1st orders, to be measured by the microscope [9].
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biosensors-03-00201-f001: Working principle of the quantum well-surface plasmon resonance (QW-SPR) device. The SEM image presents a grazing angle view of a device sequentially exposed to solutions of neutravidin, biotinylated polyclonal IAV-H3N2 antibodies and capsids of IAV-H3N2. The Au grating is visible on the surface, under which a SiO2 layer is deposited atop the GaAs-AlGaAs QW. Inset: Broadband and uncollimated NIR light is emitted from the QW to couple a continuum of SP modes on the surface, since conditions for SPR are concurrently met for a range of E(kll). The propagating modes can then diffract, mainly through the ±1st orders, to be measured by the microscope [9].

Mentions: An integration of the SPR technology with a light emitting semiconductor is achieved by constructing a metal-dielectric interface atop the solid-state light emitting substrate [2,6,7,8], as shown in Figure 1 [9]. Through electroluminescence or photoluminescence (PL), the embedded quantum well (QW) is excited to emit radiation. For the most general case presented here, the emission is uncollimated (i.e., propagating in all directions) and the broadband spectral bandwidth exceeds 140 nm (1.38–1.65 eV). A dielectric spacer and metal layer are deposited by evaporation on the structure, thus enabling the support of surface plasmon (SP) modes. The metal layer is corrugated in order to extract the SPs into the far field for imaging by a microscope. This top layer can also be biofunctionalized in various manners for specific experiments. The principle behind uncollimated and broadband SP coupling is detailed in Figure 2 [9]. A continuous range of incoming radiation from the QW encounters the metal layer at the dielectric interface.


Miniaturized quantum semiconductor surface plasmon resonance platform for detection of biological molecules.

Lepage D, Dubowski JJ - Biosensors (Basel) (2013)

Working principle of the quantum well-surface plasmon resonance (QW-SPR) device. The SEM image presents a grazing angle view of a device sequentially exposed to solutions of neutravidin, biotinylated polyclonal IAV-H3N2 antibodies and capsids of IAV-H3N2. The Au grating is visible on the surface, under which a SiO2 layer is deposited atop the GaAs-AlGaAs QW. Inset: Broadband and uncollimated NIR light is emitted from the QW to couple a continuum of SP modes on the surface, since conditions for SPR are concurrently met for a range of E(kll). The propagating modes can then diffract, mainly through the ±1st orders, to be measured by the microscope [9].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263536&req=5

biosensors-03-00201-f001: Working principle of the quantum well-surface plasmon resonance (QW-SPR) device. The SEM image presents a grazing angle view of a device sequentially exposed to solutions of neutravidin, biotinylated polyclonal IAV-H3N2 antibodies and capsids of IAV-H3N2. The Au grating is visible on the surface, under which a SiO2 layer is deposited atop the GaAs-AlGaAs QW. Inset: Broadband and uncollimated NIR light is emitted from the QW to couple a continuum of SP modes on the surface, since conditions for SPR are concurrently met for a range of E(kll). The propagating modes can then diffract, mainly through the ±1st orders, to be measured by the microscope [9].
Mentions: An integration of the SPR technology with a light emitting semiconductor is achieved by constructing a metal-dielectric interface atop the solid-state light emitting substrate [2,6,7,8], as shown in Figure 1 [9]. Through electroluminescence or photoluminescence (PL), the embedded quantum well (QW) is excited to emit radiation. For the most general case presented here, the emission is uncollimated (i.e., propagating in all directions) and the broadband spectral bandwidth exceeds 140 nm (1.38–1.65 eV). A dielectric spacer and metal layer are deposited by evaporation on the structure, thus enabling the support of surface plasmon (SP) modes. The metal layer is corrugated in order to extract the SPs into the far field for imaging by a microscope. This top layer can also be biofunctionalized in various manners for specific experiments. The principle behind uncollimated and broadband SP coupling is detailed in Figure 2 [9]. A continuous range of incoming radiation from the QW encounters the metal layer at the dielectric interface.

Bottom Line: The SPR technology is already commonly used for biochemical characterization in pharmaceutical industries, but the reduction of the distance between the SP exciting source and the biosensing platform to a few hundreds of nanometers is an innovative approach enabling us to achieve an ultimate miniaturization of the device.We evaluate the signal quality of this nanophotonic QW-SPR device using hyperspectral-imaging technology, and we compare its performance with that of a standard prism-based commercial system.With an innovative conical method of SPR data collection, we demonstrate that individually collected SPR scan, each in less than 2.2 s, yield a resolution of the detection at 1.5 × 10-6 RIU.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Quantum Semiconductors and Photon-based BioNanotechnology, Interdisciplinary Institute for Technological Innovation (3IT), Faculty of Engineering, Université de Sherbrooke, 3000 boul. de l'Université, Sherbrooke, QC J1K 0A5, Canada. dominic.lepage@usherbrooke.ca.

ABSTRACT
The concept of a portable, inexpensive and semi-automated biosensing platform, or lab-on-a-chip, is a vision shared by many researchers and venture industries. Under this scope, we have investigated the application of optical emission from quantum well (QW) microstructures for monitoring surface phenomena on gold layers remaining in proximity (<300 nm) with QW microstructures. The uncollimated QW radiation excites surface plasmons (SP) and through the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect allows for detection of small perturbation in the density surface adsorbates. The SPR technology is already commonly used for biochemical characterization in pharmaceutical industries, but the reduction of the distance between the SP exciting source and the biosensing platform to a few hundreds of nanometers is an innovative approach enabling us to achieve an ultimate miniaturization of the device. We evaluate the signal quality of this nanophotonic QW-SPR device using hyperspectral-imaging technology, and we compare its performance with that of a standard prism-based commercial system. Two standard biochemical agents are employed for this characterization study: bovine serum albumin and inactivated influenza A virus. With an innovative conical method of SPR data collection, we demonstrate that individually collected SPR scan, each in less than 2.2 s, yield a resolution of the detection at 1.5 × 10-6 RIU.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus