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Cancer education in Lithuania.

Mineikyte R, Janulionis E, Liutkeviciute-Navickiene J, Atkocius V - Ecancermedicalscience (2014)

Bottom Line: In Lithuania, continuing specialist medical training is mandatory.This requirement is ensured with the process of licensing of medical practice.All Lithuanian study programmes are certificated by an independent public agency and are recognised by a number of other countries as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Cancer Institute, Santariskiu Street 1, 08660 Vilnius, Lithuania.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this article is to describe cancer education in Lithuania according to the data of 2013. In Lithuania, there are the following stages of education for physicians: basic education through integrated studies of medicine (six years), postgraduate education through residency studies (four to five years), and continuing professional development. In recent years, integrated studies of medicine have been the most popular specialty. Oncology is incorporated into the teaching courses in medicine programmes. In each university, an oncology course is mandatory during these studies. In Lithuania, there are two types of specialists related to oncology: medical oncologists and radiation oncologists. These oncologists complete multidisciplinary residency study programmes in the clinics. To receive a doctoral degree, specialists may join PhD programmes at any of the accredited universities. In recent years the number of dissertations in oncology has grown. Notably, oncology is chosen not only by students in the field of medicine. It also becomes the choice of those seeking a doctorate in the fields of nursing, public health, biochemistry, and physics. The professional development of oncologists is a lifelong commitment. In Lithuania, continuing specialist medical training is mandatory. This requirement is ensured with the process of licensing of medical practice. All Lithuanian study programmes are certificated by an independent public agency and are recognised by a number of other countries as well.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PhD theses defended in National Cancer Institute by speciality (1948–2012).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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figure5: PhD theses defended in National Cancer Institute by speciality (1948–2012).

Mentions: LUHS performs PhD studies in the field of oncology together with its branches: Clinic of Oncology and Haematology and Laboratory of Oncologic Science; VU performs these studies at branches of medicine faculties together with the National Cancer Institute, where about 30 PhD theses were defended by different speciality doctorants in ten years since 2000 (Figures 4 and 5).


Cancer education in Lithuania.

Mineikyte R, Janulionis E, Liutkeviciute-Navickiene J, Atkocius V - Ecancermedicalscience (2014)

PhD theses defended in National Cancer Institute by speciality (1948–2012).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263525&req=5

figure5: PhD theses defended in National Cancer Institute by speciality (1948–2012).
Mentions: LUHS performs PhD studies in the field of oncology together with its branches: Clinic of Oncology and Haematology and Laboratory of Oncologic Science; VU performs these studies at branches of medicine faculties together with the National Cancer Institute, where about 30 PhD theses were defended by different speciality doctorants in ten years since 2000 (Figures 4 and 5).

Bottom Line: In Lithuania, continuing specialist medical training is mandatory.This requirement is ensured with the process of licensing of medical practice.All Lithuanian study programmes are certificated by an independent public agency and are recognised by a number of other countries as well.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Cancer Institute, Santariskiu Street 1, 08660 Vilnius, Lithuania.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this article is to describe cancer education in Lithuania according to the data of 2013. In Lithuania, there are the following stages of education for physicians: basic education through integrated studies of medicine (six years), postgraduate education through residency studies (four to five years), and continuing professional development. In recent years, integrated studies of medicine have been the most popular specialty. Oncology is incorporated into the teaching courses in medicine programmes. In each university, an oncology course is mandatory during these studies. In Lithuania, there are two types of specialists related to oncology: medical oncologists and radiation oncologists. These oncologists complete multidisciplinary residency study programmes in the clinics. To receive a doctoral degree, specialists may join PhD programmes at any of the accredited universities. In recent years the number of dissertations in oncology has grown. Notably, oncology is chosen not only by students in the field of medicine. It also becomes the choice of those seeking a doctorate in the fields of nursing, public health, biochemistry, and physics. The professional development of oncologists is a lifelong commitment. In Lithuania, continuing specialist medical training is mandatory. This requirement is ensured with the process of licensing of medical practice. All Lithuanian study programmes are certificated by an independent public agency and are recognised by a number of other countries as well.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus