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Uterine myoma as a cause of iliac vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: common disease, rare complication.

Fernandes FL, Dinardo CL, Terra-Filho M - Respirol Case Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Uterine myoma is a common condition among women, which may very rarely be associated with deep venous thrombosis (VT).Considering the high prevalence of myoma in the population, it is advisable to specifically consider this hypothesis in the case of female patients with pulmonary embolism or limb VT and menstrual abnormalities.This will help to avoid extensive thrombophilia investigation and to accurately determine the correct cause of VT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pulmonary Division, Heart Institute (InCor), Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da - Universidade de São Paulo São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Uterine myoma is a common condition among women, which may very rarely be associated with deep venous thrombosis (VT). Few reports of myoma with associated VT have been reported in the English language and, of those, only three were associated with embolic events. This manuscript reports the case of a 29-year-old patient who presented with pulmonary embolism due to iliac VT secondary to extrinsic compression by a uterine myoma. Considering the high prevalence of myoma in the population, it is advisable to specifically consider this hypothesis in the case of female patients with pulmonary embolism or limb VT and menstrual abnormalities. This will help to avoid extensive thrombophilia investigation and to accurately determine the correct cause of VT.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Large intramural myoma (arrow); (B) uterine myoma compressing the iliac vein (arrow); (C) right iliac vein obstruction caused by the intramural myoma and its resulting engorgement (arrow). (D) Computed tomography pulmonary angiogram (CTPA) revealing mass filling defects in the several bilateral pulmonary artery segments (arrow), main pulmonary artery enlargement and bilateral pleural effusion concurring with bilateral emboli.
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fig01: (A) Large intramural myoma (arrow); (B) uterine myoma compressing the iliac vein (arrow); (C) right iliac vein obstruction caused by the intramural myoma and its resulting engorgement (arrow). (D) Computed tomography pulmonary angiogram (CTPA) revealing mass filling defects in the several bilateral pulmonary artery segments (arrow), main pulmonary artery enlargement and bilateral pleural effusion concurring with bilateral emboli.

Mentions: A 29-year-old female patient was diagnosed with uterine myomatosis with several fibroids. The largest myoma was intramural with 10 × 8 × 7 cm. Another subserous myoma measured 5 × 5 × 4 cm; several others were present (Fig. 1A). She was admitted for surgery with no respiratory complaints. She had no history of smoking or drug abuse, was using no medication and had no recent air travel.


Uterine myoma as a cause of iliac vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: common disease, rare complication.

Fernandes FL, Dinardo CL, Terra-Filho M - Respirol Case Rep (2014)

(A) Large intramural myoma (arrow); (B) uterine myoma compressing the iliac vein (arrow); (C) right iliac vein obstruction caused by the intramural myoma and its resulting engorgement (arrow). (D) Computed tomography pulmonary angiogram (CTPA) revealing mass filling defects in the several bilateral pulmonary artery segments (arrow), main pulmonary artery enlargement and bilateral pleural effusion concurring with bilateral emboli.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263493&req=5

fig01: (A) Large intramural myoma (arrow); (B) uterine myoma compressing the iliac vein (arrow); (C) right iliac vein obstruction caused by the intramural myoma and its resulting engorgement (arrow). (D) Computed tomography pulmonary angiogram (CTPA) revealing mass filling defects in the several bilateral pulmonary artery segments (arrow), main pulmonary artery enlargement and bilateral pleural effusion concurring with bilateral emboli.
Mentions: A 29-year-old female patient was diagnosed with uterine myomatosis with several fibroids. The largest myoma was intramural with 10 × 8 × 7 cm. Another subserous myoma measured 5 × 5 × 4 cm; several others were present (Fig. 1A). She was admitted for surgery with no respiratory complaints. She had no history of smoking or drug abuse, was using no medication and had no recent air travel.

Bottom Line: Uterine myoma is a common condition among women, which may very rarely be associated with deep venous thrombosis (VT).Considering the high prevalence of myoma in the population, it is advisable to specifically consider this hypothesis in the case of female patients with pulmonary embolism or limb VT and menstrual abnormalities.This will help to avoid extensive thrombophilia investigation and to accurately determine the correct cause of VT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pulmonary Division, Heart Institute (InCor), Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da - Universidade de São Paulo São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Uterine myoma is a common condition among women, which may very rarely be associated with deep venous thrombosis (VT). Few reports of myoma with associated VT have been reported in the English language and, of those, only three were associated with embolic events. This manuscript reports the case of a 29-year-old patient who presented with pulmonary embolism due to iliac VT secondary to extrinsic compression by a uterine myoma. Considering the high prevalence of myoma in the population, it is advisable to specifically consider this hypothesis in the case of female patients with pulmonary embolism or limb VT and menstrual abnormalities. This will help to avoid extensive thrombophilia investigation and to accurately determine the correct cause of VT.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus