Limits...
Changes in protein level in the cerebrospinal fluid of a patient with cerebral radiation necrosis treated with bevacizumab.

Yano H, Nakayama N, Morimitsu K, Futamura M, Ohe N, Miwa K, Shinoda J, Iwama T - Clin Med Insights Oncol (2014)

Bottom Line: Interestingly, after 2 days, the agents had dramatically reduced the CSF protein level.After 10 courses of this regimen, the CSF protein level decreased to 338 mg/dL, which is less than half of the initial level.Long-term administration of bevacizumab might decrease leakage of protein from the vessels around the ventriculus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan.

ABSTRACT
A 32-year-old woman underwent surgeries and radiation therapy for astrocytoma. She developed symptomatic radiation necrosis in the lesion, which caused hydrocephalus. She initially underwent ventricular drainage, because the protein level in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was 787 mg/dL, which was too high for shunt surgery. Because she also had breast cancer, which was pathologically diagnosed as an invasive ductal carcinoma, standard bevacizumab therapy in combination with paclitaxel every 2 weeks was selected. Interestingly, after 2 days, the agents had dramatically reduced the CSF protein level. However, it returned to approximately the initial level within 2 weeks. After two courses of this regimen, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed. After 10 courses of this regimen, the CSF protein level decreased to 338 mg/dL, which is less than half of the initial level. Long-term administration of bevacizumab might decrease leakage of protein from the vessels around the ventriculus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and hematoxylin and eosin (HE)-stained sections before the first and second surgeries. (A) A pretreatment gadolinium-enhanced MRI scan showing a non-enhanced round tumor in the left frontal lobe. (B) Photomicrographs of HE-stained sections showing a fibrillary astrocytoma. (C) A gadolinium-enhanced MRI scan at 18 months after tomotherapy showing the cystic lesion with a well-enhanced cyst wall. (D) Photomicrograph of an HE-stained section of the specimen obtained at the second surgery showing the malignant transformation to an anaplastic astrocytoma.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263439&req=5

f1-cmo-8-2014-153: Gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and hematoxylin and eosin (HE)-stained sections before the first and second surgeries. (A) A pretreatment gadolinium-enhanced MRI scan showing a non-enhanced round tumor in the left frontal lobe. (B) Photomicrographs of HE-stained sections showing a fibrillary astrocytoma. (C) A gadolinium-enhanced MRI scan at 18 months after tomotherapy showing the cystic lesion with a well-enhanced cyst wall. (D) Photomicrograph of an HE-stained section of the specimen obtained at the second surgery showing the malignant transformation to an anaplastic astrocytoma.

Mentions: A 32-year-old woman presented with a left frontal brain mass, which was revealed using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (Fig. 1A). She underwent partial removal of the tumor, which was diagnosed as a fibrillary astrocytoma (Fig. 1B). Two years after the operation, the residual tumor re-grew (Fig. 1C), and she underwent a second surgery. The recurrent tumor was diagnosed as an anaplastic astrocytoma (Fig. 1D).


Changes in protein level in the cerebrospinal fluid of a patient with cerebral radiation necrosis treated with bevacizumab.

Yano H, Nakayama N, Morimitsu K, Futamura M, Ohe N, Miwa K, Shinoda J, Iwama T - Clin Med Insights Oncol (2014)

Gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and hematoxylin and eosin (HE)-stained sections before the first and second surgeries. (A) A pretreatment gadolinium-enhanced MRI scan showing a non-enhanced round tumor in the left frontal lobe. (B) Photomicrographs of HE-stained sections showing a fibrillary astrocytoma. (C) A gadolinium-enhanced MRI scan at 18 months after tomotherapy showing the cystic lesion with a well-enhanced cyst wall. (D) Photomicrograph of an HE-stained section of the specimen obtained at the second surgery showing the malignant transformation to an anaplastic astrocytoma.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263439&req=5

f1-cmo-8-2014-153: Gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and hematoxylin and eosin (HE)-stained sections before the first and second surgeries. (A) A pretreatment gadolinium-enhanced MRI scan showing a non-enhanced round tumor in the left frontal lobe. (B) Photomicrographs of HE-stained sections showing a fibrillary astrocytoma. (C) A gadolinium-enhanced MRI scan at 18 months after tomotherapy showing the cystic lesion with a well-enhanced cyst wall. (D) Photomicrograph of an HE-stained section of the specimen obtained at the second surgery showing the malignant transformation to an anaplastic astrocytoma.
Mentions: A 32-year-old woman presented with a left frontal brain mass, which was revealed using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (Fig. 1A). She underwent partial removal of the tumor, which was diagnosed as a fibrillary astrocytoma (Fig. 1B). Two years after the operation, the residual tumor re-grew (Fig. 1C), and she underwent a second surgery. The recurrent tumor was diagnosed as an anaplastic astrocytoma (Fig. 1D).

Bottom Line: Interestingly, after 2 days, the agents had dramatically reduced the CSF protein level.After 10 courses of this regimen, the CSF protein level decreased to 338 mg/dL, which is less than half of the initial level.Long-term administration of bevacizumab might decrease leakage of protein from the vessels around the ventriculus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan.

ABSTRACT
A 32-year-old woman underwent surgeries and radiation therapy for astrocytoma. She developed symptomatic radiation necrosis in the lesion, which caused hydrocephalus. She initially underwent ventricular drainage, because the protein level in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was 787 mg/dL, which was too high for shunt surgery. Because she also had breast cancer, which was pathologically diagnosed as an invasive ductal carcinoma, standard bevacizumab therapy in combination with paclitaxel every 2 weeks was selected. Interestingly, after 2 days, the agents had dramatically reduced the CSF protein level. However, it returned to approximately the initial level within 2 weeks. After two courses of this regimen, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed. After 10 courses of this regimen, the CSF protein level decreased to 338 mg/dL, which is less than half of the initial level. Long-term administration of bevacizumab might decrease leakage of protein from the vessels around the ventriculus.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus