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Social perception in children born at very low birthweight and its relationship with social/behavioral outcomes.

Williamson KE, Jakobson LS - J Child Psychol Psychiatry (2014)

Bottom Line: However, we found that they were impaired in their ability to use nonverbal cues from moving faces and bodies, and situational cues, to correctly identify the emotions of characters depicted in videotaped social interactions.This research highlights links between social perceptual deficits and poor social and behavioral outcomes in children born very prematurely.The results also suggest that even those who have escaped major intellectual/language problems are at risk for social and behavioral problems that can be of clinical concern.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

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Mean percent correct for each type of nonverbal cue in the CASP (SEM indicated), displayed as a function of group membership. Follow-up tests showed group differences in the correct identification of face, body, and situational nonverbal cues, with full-term children outperforming preterm children. *** Group difference significant at the 0.001 level
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fig01: Mean percent correct for each type of nonverbal cue in the CASP (SEM indicated), displayed as a function of group membership. Follow-up tests showed group differences in the correct identification of face, body, and situational nonverbal cues, with full-term children outperforming preterm children. *** Group difference significant at the 0.001 level

Mentions: The percentage of nonverbal cues of each type that were correctly identified by participants was entered into a 2 (Group: Preterm, Full-term) × 4 (Cue Type: Face, Body, Situational, Voice) mixed ANCOVA. Significant main effects of Group [F(1, 66) = 14.08, p < .001, η2 = .18] and Cue Type [F(3, 198) = 9.36, p < .001, η2 = .12] were observed, with full-term children outperforming preterm children, and participants being most accurate at identifying available situational cues, followed by face, voice, and body cues, in that order (p < .001 for all comparisons). These main effects had to be interpreted in light of a significant Group × Cue Type interaction [F(3, 198) = 2.89, p < .05, η2 = .04] (see Figure1). Follow-up tests confirmed that, after controlling for administration time and incidental memory, full-term children correctly identified significantly more face, body, and situational cues than preterm children (p < .01, in all cases), but the groups did not differ in their ability to identify voice cues. Adding PPVT-4 standard scores as an additional covariate did not change these results. In both groups, the ability to recognize all four cue types improved with age (r > .34, p < .05).


Social perception in children born at very low birthweight and its relationship with social/behavioral outcomes.

Williamson KE, Jakobson LS - J Child Psychol Psychiatry (2014)

Mean percent correct for each type of nonverbal cue in the CASP (SEM indicated), displayed as a function of group membership. Follow-up tests showed group differences in the correct identification of face, body, and situational nonverbal cues, with full-term children outperforming preterm children. *** Group difference significant at the 0.001 level
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263237&req=5

fig01: Mean percent correct for each type of nonverbal cue in the CASP (SEM indicated), displayed as a function of group membership. Follow-up tests showed group differences in the correct identification of face, body, and situational nonverbal cues, with full-term children outperforming preterm children. *** Group difference significant at the 0.001 level
Mentions: The percentage of nonverbal cues of each type that were correctly identified by participants was entered into a 2 (Group: Preterm, Full-term) × 4 (Cue Type: Face, Body, Situational, Voice) mixed ANCOVA. Significant main effects of Group [F(1, 66) = 14.08, p < .001, η2 = .18] and Cue Type [F(3, 198) = 9.36, p < .001, η2 = .12] were observed, with full-term children outperforming preterm children, and participants being most accurate at identifying available situational cues, followed by face, voice, and body cues, in that order (p < .001 for all comparisons). These main effects had to be interpreted in light of a significant Group × Cue Type interaction [F(3, 198) = 2.89, p < .05, η2 = .04] (see Figure1). Follow-up tests confirmed that, after controlling for administration time and incidental memory, full-term children correctly identified significantly more face, body, and situational cues than preterm children (p < .01, in all cases), but the groups did not differ in their ability to identify voice cues. Adding PPVT-4 standard scores as an additional covariate did not change these results. In both groups, the ability to recognize all four cue types improved with age (r > .34, p < .05).

Bottom Line: However, we found that they were impaired in their ability to use nonverbal cues from moving faces and bodies, and situational cues, to correctly identify the emotions of characters depicted in videotaped social interactions.This research highlights links between social perceptual deficits and poor social and behavioral outcomes in children born very prematurely.The results also suggest that even those who have escaped major intellectual/language problems are at risk for social and behavioral problems that can be of clinical concern.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus