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Making an effort to feel positive: insecure attachment in infancy predicts the neural underpinnings of emotion regulation in adulthood.

Moutsiana C, Fearon P, Murray L, Cooper P, Goodyer I, Johnstone T, Halligan S - J Child Psychol Psychiatry (2014)

Bottom Line: If similar processes operate in human development then this is significant, as the capacity to regulate emotional states is fundamental to human adaptation.Specifically, while attempting to up-regulate positive emotions, adults who had been insecurely versus securely attached as infants showed greater activation in prefrontal regions involved in cognitive control and reduced co-activation of nucleus accumbens with prefrontal cortex, consistent with relative inefficiency in the neural regulation of positive affect.Disturbances in the mother-infant relationship may persistently alter the neural circuitry of emotion regulation, with potential implications for adjustment in adulthood.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences, University College London, London, UK.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Attachment based differences in the BOLD response to the up-regulate versus passive viewing of positive pictures; indicated areas showed relatively greater activation during the up-regulate condition in the insecure versus secure group. Significant differences were found in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (green), dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (blue) and the right (pink) and left (red) anterior prefrontal cortex
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fig01: Attachment based differences in the BOLD response to the up-regulate versus passive viewing of positive pictures; indicated areas showed relatively greater activation during the up-regulate condition in the insecure versus secure group. Significant differences were found in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (green), dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (blue) and the right (pink) and left (red) anterior prefrontal cortex

Mentions: For the positive stimuli, voxelwise analyses of the ‘increase’ versus ‘attend’ contrast yielded a number of brain regions that were significantly more active in the insecure attachment group than in the secure group. Effects were unchanged when maternal PND (present/absent), current depressive symptoms (CESD), past history of depression (present/absent), and gender were also included in the model. Results, including gender, past depression, CESD scores and maternal PND as covariates, are presented in Table2 and Figure1. Significant differences were identified in four regions; left and right anterior PFC/frontal pole, rostral ACC (rACC), and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). In each case, greater activation was observed in the insecure than the secure group during up-regulation relative to passive viewing of positive pictures (i.e., increase vs. attend).


Making an effort to feel positive: insecure attachment in infancy predicts the neural underpinnings of emotion regulation in adulthood.

Moutsiana C, Fearon P, Murray L, Cooper P, Goodyer I, Johnstone T, Halligan S - J Child Psychol Psychiatry (2014)

Attachment based differences in the BOLD response to the up-regulate versus passive viewing of positive pictures; indicated areas showed relatively greater activation during the up-regulate condition in the insecure versus secure group. Significant differences were found in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (green), dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (blue) and the right (pink) and left (red) anterior prefrontal cortex
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263234&req=5

fig01: Attachment based differences in the BOLD response to the up-regulate versus passive viewing of positive pictures; indicated areas showed relatively greater activation during the up-regulate condition in the insecure versus secure group. Significant differences were found in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (green), dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (blue) and the right (pink) and left (red) anterior prefrontal cortex
Mentions: For the positive stimuli, voxelwise analyses of the ‘increase’ versus ‘attend’ contrast yielded a number of brain regions that were significantly more active in the insecure attachment group than in the secure group. Effects were unchanged when maternal PND (present/absent), current depressive symptoms (CESD), past history of depression (present/absent), and gender were also included in the model. Results, including gender, past depression, CESD scores and maternal PND as covariates, are presented in Table2 and Figure1. Significant differences were identified in four regions; left and right anterior PFC/frontal pole, rostral ACC (rACC), and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). In each case, greater activation was observed in the insecure than the secure group during up-regulation relative to passive viewing of positive pictures (i.e., increase vs. attend).

Bottom Line: If similar processes operate in human development then this is significant, as the capacity to regulate emotional states is fundamental to human adaptation.Specifically, while attempting to up-regulate positive emotions, adults who had been insecurely versus securely attached as infants showed greater activation in prefrontal regions involved in cognitive control and reduced co-activation of nucleus accumbens with prefrontal cortex, consistent with relative inefficiency in the neural regulation of positive affect.Disturbances in the mother-infant relationship may persistently alter the neural circuitry of emotion regulation, with potential implications for adjustment in adulthood.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences, University College London, London, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus