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Increase in child behavior problems among urban Brazilian 4-year olds: 1993 and 2004 Pelotas birth cohorts.

Matijasevich A, Murray E, Stein A, Anselmi L, Menezes AM, Santos IS, Barros AJ, Gigante DP, Barros FC, Victora CG - J Child Psychol Psychiatry (2014)

Bottom Line: The aim was to investigate changes in preschool behavioral/emotional problems in two birth cohorts from a middle-income country born 11 years apart.We analyzed data from the 1993 and 2004 Pelotas birth cohort studies from Brazil.Response rates in these two population-based cohorts were above 90%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil; Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

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Mean CBCL scores and SEM in boys in the 1993 and 2004 Pelotas cohort studies adjusted for age (months) at the time of testing. Note. *p < .05, **p < .001; R-B, rule-breaking behavior; SEM, standard error of the mean
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fig02: Mean CBCL scores and SEM in boys in the 1993 and 2004 Pelotas cohort studies adjusted for age (months) at the time of testing. Note. *p < .05, **p < .001; R-B, rule-breaking behavior; SEM, standard error of the mean

Mentions: Changes in CBCL scores between the 1993 and 2004 cohorts are presented in Figures1 and 2 (among girls and boys, respectively). Substantial increases were detected in mean CBCL total problems, internalizing and externalizing mean scores (approximately 25%, 10%, and 25%, respectively). Increases were also identified in mean somatic complaints, thought problems (only among girls), and aggressive behavior syndrome scores. Interestingly, there was a reduction in attention problem mean scores over the study period (approximately 21%). There were no significant differences in the withdrawn, anxious/depressed, social problems, and rule-breaking behavior syndrome scores between the two cohorts.


Increase in child behavior problems among urban Brazilian 4-year olds: 1993 and 2004 Pelotas birth cohorts.

Matijasevich A, Murray E, Stein A, Anselmi L, Menezes AM, Santos IS, Barros AJ, Gigante DP, Barros FC, Victora CG - J Child Psychol Psychiatry (2014)

Mean CBCL scores and SEM in boys in the 1993 and 2004 Pelotas cohort studies adjusted for age (months) at the time of testing. Note. *p < .05, **p < .001; R-B, rule-breaking behavior; SEM, standard error of the mean
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263231&req=5

fig02: Mean CBCL scores and SEM in boys in the 1993 and 2004 Pelotas cohort studies adjusted for age (months) at the time of testing. Note. *p < .05, **p < .001; R-B, rule-breaking behavior; SEM, standard error of the mean
Mentions: Changes in CBCL scores between the 1993 and 2004 cohorts are presented in Figures1 and 2 (among girls and boys, respectively). Substantial increases were detected in mean CBCL total problems, internalizing and externalizing mean scores (approximately 25%, 10%, and 25%, respectively). Increases were also identified in mean somatic complaints, thought problems (only among girls), and aggressive behavior syndrome scores. Interestingly, there was a reduction in attention problem mean scores over the study period (approximately 21%). There were no significant differences in the withdrawn, anxious/depressed, social problems, and rule-breaking behavior syndrome scores between the two cohorts.

Bottom Line: The aim was to investigate changes in preschool behavioral/emotional problems in two birth cohorts from a middle-income country born 11 years apart.We analyzed data from the 1993 and 2004 Pelotas birth cohort studies from Brazil.Response rates in these two population-based cohorts were above 90%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Postgraduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil; Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus