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Implementation of multidimensional knowledge translation strategies to improve procedural pain in hospitalized children.

Stevens BJ, Yamada J, Promislow S, Stinson J, Harrison D, Victor JC, Members of the CIHR Team in Children’s Pa - Implement Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: The most effective single or combination of KT strategies has not been found.Units successful in achieving their aims implemented more KT strategies than units that did not.Further research is required to better understand implementation outcomes, such as feasibility and fidelity, how context influences the effectiveness of multifaceted KT strategies, and the sustainability of improved pain practices and outcomes over time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, 686 Bay Street, Room 06.9712, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X8, Canada. b.stevens@utoronto.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite extensive research, institutional policies, and practice guidelines, procedural pain remains undertreated in hospitalized children. Knowledge translation (KT) strategies have been employed to bridge the research to practice gap with varying success. The most effective single or combination of KT strategies has not been found. A multifaceted KT intervention, Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality (EPIQ), that included tailored KT strategies was effective in improving pain practices and clinical outcomes at the unit level in a prospective comparative cohort study in 32 hospital units (16 EPIQ intervention and 16 Standard Care), in eight pediatric hospitals in Canada. In a study of the 16 EPIQ units (two at each hospital) only, the objectives were to: determine the effectiveness of evidence-based KT strategies implemented to achieve unit aims; describe the KT strategies implemented and their influence on pain assessment and management across unit types; and identify facilitators and barriers to their implementation.

Methods: Data were collected from each EPIQ intervention unit on targeted pain practices and KT strategies implemented, through chart review and a process evaluation checklist, following four intervention cycles over a 15-month period.

Results: Following the completion of the four cycle intervention, 78% of 23 targeted pain practice aims across units were achieved within 80% of the stated aims. A statistically significant improvement was found in the proportion of children receiving pain assessment and management, regardless of pre-determined aims (p < 0.001). The median number of KT strategies implemented was 35 and included reminders, educational outreach and materials, and audit and feedback. Units successful in achieving their aims implemented more KT strategies than units that did not. No specific type of single or combination of KT strategies was more effective in improving pain assessment and management outcomes. Tailoring KT strategies to unit context, support from unit leadership, staff engagement, and dedicated time and resources were identified as facilitating effective implementation of the strategies.

Conclusions: Further research is required to better understand implementation outcomes, such as feasibility and fidelity, how context influences the effectiveness of multifaceted KT strategies, and the sustainability of improved pain practices and outcomes over time.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Allocation diagram. SC, Standard Care; EPIQ, Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality.
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Fig1: Allocation diagram. SC, Standard Care; EPIQ, Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality.

Mentions: The CIHR Team in Children’s Pain successfully implemented the EPIQ intervention in a prospective cohort comparative design study with repeated measures. Thirty-two inpatient hospital units, consisting of medical, surgical, and critical care units from eight Canadian tertiary, pediatric urban-based health centers, participated in the study over a 15-month intervention period. Details regarding the eligibility of participating units have been previously described [8]. Sixteen units (six medical, four surgical, six critical care) were allocated to receive the EPIQ intervention while the remaining 16 units (eight medical, four surgical, four critical care) received standard care. At each hospital, to achieve overall balanced allocation, two units were allocated to EPIQ and two to standard care. Allocation was based on units’ baseline pain assessment and management practices [9,10], allowing for equal inclusion of both high- and low-performing units in the intervention and standard care groups (Figure 1).Figure 1


Implementation of multidimensional knowledge translation strategies to improve procedural pain in hospitalized children.

Stevens BJ, Yamada J, Promislow S, Stinson J, Harrison D, Victor JC, Members of the CIHR Team in Children’s Pa - Implement Sci (2014)

Allocation diagram. SC, Standard Care; EPIQ, Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263210&req=5

Fig1: Allocation diagram. SC, Standard Care; EPIQ, Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality.
Mentions: The CIHR Team in Children’s Pain successfully implemented the EPIQ intervention in a prospective cohort comparative design study with repeated measures. Thirty-two inpatient hospital units, consisting of medical, surgical, and critical care units from eight Canadian tertiary, pediatric urban-based health centers, participated in the study over a 15-month intervention period. Details regarding the eligibility of participating units have been previously described [8]. Sixteen units (six medical, four surgical, six critical care) were allocated to receive the EPIQ intervention while the remaining 16 units (eight medical, four surgical, four critical care) received standard care. At each hospital, to achieve overall balanced allocation, two units were allocated to EPIQ and two to standard care. Allocation was based on units’ baseline pain assessment and management practices [9,10], allowing for equal inclusion of both high- and low-performing units in the intervention and standard care groups (Figure 1).Figure 1

Bottom Line: The most effective single or combination of KT strategies has not been found.Units successful in achieving their aims implemented more KT strategies than units that did not.Further research is required to better understand implementation outcomes, such as feasibility and fidelity, how context influences the effectiveness of multifaceted KT strategies, and the sustainability of improved pain practices and outcomes over time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, 686 Bay Street, Room 06.9712, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X8, Canada. b.stevens@utoronto.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite extensive research, institutional policies, and practice guidelines, procedural pain remains undertreated in hospitalized children. Knowledge translation (KT) strategies have been employed to bridge the research to practice gap with varying success. The most effective single or combination of KT strategies has not been found. A multifaceted KT intervention, Evidence-based Practice for Improving Quality (EPIQ), that included tailored KT strategies was effective in improving pain practices and clinical outcomes at the unit level in a prospective comparative cohort study in 32 hospital units (16 EPIQ intervention and 16 Standard Care), in eight pediatric hospitals in Canada. In a study of the 16 EPIQ units (two at each hospital) only, the objectives were to: determine the effectiveness of evidence-based KT strategies implemented to achieve unit aims; describe the KT strategies implemented and their influence on pain assessment and management across unit types; and identify facilitators and barriers to their implementation.

Methods: Data were collected from each EPIQ intervention unit on targeted pain practices and KT strategies implemented, through chart review and a process evaluation checklist, following four intervention cycles over a 15-month period.

Results: Following the completion of the four cycle intervention, 78% of 23 targeted pain practice aims across units were achieved within 80% of the stated aims. A statistically significant improvement was found in the proportion of children receiving pain assessment and management, regardless of pre-determined aims (p < 0.001). The median number of KT strategies implemented was 35 and included reminders, educational outreach and materials, and audit and feedback. Units successful in achieving their aims implemented more KT strategies than units that did not. No specific type of single or combination of KT strategies was more effective in improving pain assessment and management outcomes. Tailoring KT strategies to unit context, support from unit leadership, staff engagement, and dedicated time and resources were identified as facilitating effective implementation of the strategies.

Conclusions: Further research is required to better understand implementation outcomes, such as feasibility and fidelity, how context influences the effectiveness of multifaceted KT strategies, and the sustainability of improved pain practices and outcomes over time.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus