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Determining the fibrillar orientation of bast fibres with polarized light microscopy: the modified Herzog test (red plate test) explained.

Haugan E, Holst B - J Microsc (2013)

Bottom Line: The test has the reputation for never producing false results, but also for occasionally not working.However, so far, no proper justification has been provided in the literature that the 'no false results' assumption is really correct and it has also not been clear up till now, why the method sometimes does not work.We also provide an explanation for why the Herzog test sometimes does not work: According to our model, the Herzog test will not work if none of the three distinct layers in the secondary cell wall is significantly thicker than the others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

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Measured intensity graph for a flax fibre (S-twist) as a function of sample orientation angle α. Note the excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions in Figure 8.
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fig11: Measured intensity graph for a flax fibre (S-twist) as a function of sample orientation angle α. Note the excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions in Figure 8.


Determining the fibrillar orientation of bast fibres with polarized light microscopy: the modified Herzog test (red plate test) explained.

Haugan E, Holst B - J Microsc (2013)

Measured intensity graph for a flax fibre (S-twist) as a function of sample orientation angle α. Note the excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions in Figure 8.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263192&req=5

fig11: Measured intensity graph for a flax fibre (S-twist) as a function of sample orientation angle α. Note the excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions in Figure 8.
Bottom Line: The test has the reputation for never producing false results, but also for occasionally not working.However, so far, no proper justification has been provided in the literature that the 'no false results' assumption is really correct and it has also not been clear up till now, why the method sometimes does not work.We also provide an explanation for why the Herzog test sometimes does not work: According to our model, the Herzog test will not work if none of the three distinct layers in the secondary cell wall is significantly thicker than the others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

Show MeSH