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Causes of child mortality (1 to 4 years of age) from 1983 to 2012 in the Republic of Korea: national vital data.

Choe SA, Cho SI - J Prev Med Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: The child (1-4 years) mortality rates substantially decreased during the past three decades.The trend analysis revealed that all the five major causes of death (infectious, neoplastic, neurologic, congenital, and external origins) have decreased significantly.External causes of death remain the most frequent origin of child mortality, and the proportion of mortality due to child assault has significantly increased (from 1.02 in 1983 to 1.38 in 2012).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Child mortality remains a critical problem even in developed countries due to low fertility. To plan effective interventions, investigation into the trends and causes of child mortality is necessary. Therefore, we analyzed these trends and causes of child deaths over the last 30 years in Korea.

Methods: Causes of death data were obtained from a nationwide vital registration managed by the Korean Statistical Information Service. The mortality rate among all children aged between one and four years and the causes of deaths were reviewed. Data from 1983-2012 and 1993-2012 were analyzed separately because the proportion of unspecified causes of death during 1983-1992 varied substantially from that during 1993-2012.

Results: The child (1-4 years) mortality rates substantially decreased during the past three decades. The trend analysis revealed that all the five major causes of death (infectious, neoplastic, neurologic, congenital, and external origins) have decreased significantly. However, the sex ratio of child mortality (boys to girls) slightly increased during the last 30 years. External causes of death remain the most frequent origin of child mortality, and the proportion of mortality due to child assault has significantly increased (from 1.02 in 1983 to 1.38 in 2012).

Conclusions: In Korea, the major causes and rate of child mortality have changed and the sex ratio of child mortality has slightly increased since the early 1980s. Child mortality, especially due to preventable causes, requires public health intervention.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Annual rate and sex ratio (male to female) of child mortality (1-4 years of age) in Korea (1983-2012). Loess smoothing lines were added (with the shaded area representing two standard errors).
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f1-jpmph-47-6-336: Annual rate and sex ratio (male to female) of child mortality (1-4 years of age) in Korea (1983-2012). Loess smoothing lines were added (with the shaded area representing two standard errors).

Mentions: To explore patterns in child mortality, the five leading causes of death during 1993-2012 were selected for our final analysis after excluding for any unspecified causes of death. Although respiratory and circulatory diseases were frequent causes of child death in 1983-1992, they were excluded in our analysis because they were ranked higher than the first through seventh causes of mortality in 1993-2012. We found a decreasing trend in annual child mortality rates (Figure 1). The child mortality rate had fallen from 202.3 to 20.2 in 1983 and 2012, respectively. Moreover, a modest increase was observed in sex ratio of child mortality, 1.03 in 1983 to 1.38 in 2012. When classifying the cause of death using the ICD-10 system, this reduction in total child mortality was mainly attributed to the decrease in infectious (29%), unclassified (29%), and external causes (22%) of child mortality (data not shown).


Causes of child mortality (1 to 4 years of age) from 1983 to 2012 in the Republic of Korea: national vital data.

Choe SA, Cho SI - J Prev Med Public Health (2014)

Annual rate and sex ratio (male to female) of child mortality (1-4 years of age) in Korea (1983-2012). Loess smoothing lines were added (with the shaded area representing two standard errors).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263004&req=5

f1-jpmph-47-6-336: Annual rate and sex ratio (male to female) of child mortality (1-4 years of age) in Korea (1983-2012). Loess smoothing lines were added (with the shaded area representing two standard errors).
Mentions: To explore patterns in child mortality, the five leading causes of death during 1993-2012 were selected for our final analysis after excluding for any unspecified causes of death. Although respiratory and circulatory diseases were frequent causes of child death in 1983-1992, they were excluded in our analysis because they were ranked higher than the first through seventh causes of mortality in 1993-2012. We found a decreasing trend in annual child mortality rates (Figure 1). The child mortality rate had fallen from 202.3 to 20.2 in 1983 and 2012, respectively. Moreover, a modest increase was observed in sex ratio of child mortality, 1.03 in 1983 to 1.38 in 2012. When classifying the cause of death using the ICD-10 system, this reduction in total child mortality was mainly attributed to the decrease in infectious (29%), unclassified (29%), and external causes (22%) of child mortality (data not shown).

Bottom Line: The child (1-4 years) mortality rates substantially decreased during the past three decades.The trend analysis revealed that all the five major causes of death (infectious, neoplastic, neurologic, congenital, and external origins) have decreased significantly.External causes of death remain the most frequent origin of child mortality, and the proportion of mortality due to child assault has significantly increased (from 1.02 in 1983 to 1.38 in 2012).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Child mortality remains a critical problem even in developed countries due to low fertility. To plan effective interventions, investigation into the trends and causes of child mortality is necessary. Therefore, we analyzed these trends and causes of child deaths over the last 30 years in Korea.

Methods: Causes of death data were obtained from a nationwide vital registration managed by the Korean Statistical Information Service. The mortality rate among all children aged between one and four years and the causes of deaths were reviewed. Data from 1983-2012 and 1993-2012 were analyzed separately because the proportion of unspecified causes of death during 1983-1992 varied substantially from that during 1993-2012.

Results: The child (1-4 years) mortality rates substantially decreased during the past three decades. The trend analysis revealed that all the five major causes of death (infectious, neoplastic, neurologic, congenital, and external origins) have decreased significantly. However, the sex ratio of child mortality (boys to girls) slightly increased during the last 30 years. External causes of death remain the most frequent origin of child mortality, and the proportion of mortality due to child assault has significantly increased (from 1.02 in 1983 to 1.38 in 2012).

Conclusions: In Korea, the major causes and rate of child mortality have changed and the sex ratio of child mortality has slightly increased since the early 1980s. Child mortality, especially due to preventable causes, requires public health intervention.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus