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Medical care expenditure in suicides from non-illness-related causes.

Sohn J, Cho J, Moon KT, Suh M, Ha KH, Kim C, Shin DC, Jung SH - J Prev Med Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: In the younger group, the proportion of total medical expenditure for external injuries was higher than that in the older groups.After stratification into the four age groups, a significant positive association with medical care expenditures and being a suicide completer was found in the adolescent and young adult groups, but no significant results were found in the elderly groups for both men and women.This reinforces the notion that suicide prevention strategies for young people with suicidal risk factors are needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Several epidemiological studies on medical care utilization prior to suicide have considered the motivation of suicide, but focused on the influence of physical illnesses. Medical care expenditure in suicide completers with non-illness-related causes has not been investigated.

Methods: Suicides motivated by non-illness-related factors were identified using the investigator's note from the National Police Agency, which was then linked to the Health Insurance Review and Assessment data. We investigated the medical care expenditures of cases one year prior to committing suicide and conducted a case-control study using conditional logistic regression analysis after adjusting for age, gender, area of residence, and socioeconomic status.

Results: Among the 4515 suicides motivated by non-illness-related causes, medical care expenditures increased in only the last 3 months prior to suicide in the adolescent group. In the younger group, the proportion of total medical expenditure for external injuries was higher than that in the older groups. Conditional logistic regression analysis showed significant associations with being a suicide completer and having a rural residence, low socioeconomic status, and high medical care expenditure. After stratification into the four age groups, a significant positive association with medical care expenditures and being a suicide completer was found in the adolescent and young adult groups, but no significant results were found in the elderly groups for both men and women.

Conclusions: Younger adults who committed suicide motivated by non-illness-related causes had a higher proportion of external injuries and more medical care expenditures than their controls did. This reinforces the notion that suicide prevention strategies for young people with suicidal risk factors are needed.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Individual medical care expenditure during period of 1 year prior to suicide stratified according to age and gender. (A) Men and (B) women.
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f1-jpmph-47-6-327: Individual medical care expenditure during period of 1 year prior to suicide stratified according to age and gender. (A) Men and (B) women.

Mentions: Figure 1 presents the patterns in medical care expenditure during one year prior to suicide individually by gender and age group. Among both men and women, the medical care expenditure increased in only last three months prior to committing suicide among those in aged between 10 to 19 years, while a gradual increase over the one-year period was noted in the other age groups. Table 2 shows the medical care utilization and total medical care expenditures of the cases who utilized medical care within one year prior to committing suicide stratified by disease diagnosis. The percentage of cases and expenditures for external injuries were higher in the adolescent and young adult groups than that among the older age groups in both men and women. Among men, the proportion of medical care expenditure for external injuries was especially higher in the adolescent (53.5% vs. 15.9%) and young adult groups (20.7% vs. 10.3%). In the older age groups, the proportion of external injuries was much lower than that among the young age group with little difference between these findings in men and women.


Medical care expenditure in suicides from non-illness-related causes.

Sohn J, Cho J, Moon KT, Suh M, Ha KH, Kim C, Shin DC, Jung SH - J Prev Med Public Health (2014)

Individual medical care expenditure during period of 1 year prior to suicide stratified according to age and gender. (A) Men and (B) women.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4263001&req=5

f1-jpmph-47-6-327: Individual medical care expenditure during period of 1 year prior to suicide stratified according to age and gender. (A) Men and (B) women.
Mentions: Figure 1 presents the patterns in medical care expenditure during one year prior to suicide individually by gender and age group. Among both men and women, the medical care expenditure increased in only last three months prior to committing suicide among those in aged between 10 to 19 years, while a gradual increase over the one-year period was noted in the other age groups. Table 2 shows the medical care utilization and total medical care expenditures of the cases who utilized medical care within one year prior to committing suicide stratified by disease diagnosis. The percentage of cases and expenditures for external injuries were higher in the adolescent and young adult groups than that among the older age groups in both men and women. Among men, the proportion of medical care expenditure for external injuries was especially higher in the adolescent (53.5% vs. 15.9%) and young adult groups (20.7% vs. 10.3%). In the older age groups, the proportion of external injuries was much lower than that among the young age group with little difference between these findings in men and women.

Bottom Line: In the younger group, the proportion of total medical expenditure for external injuries was higher than that in the older groups.After stratification into the four age groups, a significant positive association with medical care expenditures and being a suicide completer was found in the adolescent and young adult groups, but no significant results were found in the elderly groups for both men and women.This reinforces the notion that suicide prevention strategies for young people with suicidal risk factors are needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Several epidemiological studies on medical care utilization prior to suicide have considered the motivation of suicide, but focused on the influence of physical illnesses. Medical care expenditure in suicide completers with non-illness-related causes has not been investigated.

Methods: Suicides motivated by non-illness-related factors were identified using the investigator's note from the National Police Agency, which was then linked to the Health Insurance Review and Assessment data. We investigated the medical care expenditures of cases one year prior to committing suicide and conducted a case-control study using conditional logistic regression analysis after adjusting for age, gender, area of residence, and socioeconomic status.

Results: Among the 4515 suicides motivated by non-illness-related causes, medical care expenditures increased in only the last 3 months prior to suicide in the adolescent group. In the younger group, the proportion of total medical expenditure for external injuries was higher than that in the older groups. Conditional logistic regression analysis showed significant associations with being a suicide completer and having a rural residence, low socioeconomic status, and high medical care expenditure. After stratification into the four age groups, a significant positive association with medical care expenditures and being a suicide completer was found in the adolescent and young adult groups, but no significant results were found in the elderly groups for both men and women.

Conclusions: Younger adults who committed suicide motivated by non-illness-related causes had a higher proportion of external injuries and more medical care expenditures than their controls did. This reinforces the notion that suicide prevention strategies for young people with suicidal risk factors are needed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus