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Effect of FTO Gene and Physical Activity Interaction on Trunk Fat Percentage Among the Newfoundland Population.

Payne A, Cahill F, Sun G, Loredo-Osti JC, Abarin T - Genet Epigenet (2014)

Bottom Line: For highly active males, trunk fat percentage varied significantly between variants of rs9939609 and rs1421085, but there is no significant effect among individuals with low activity.Homozygous male carriers of non-obesity risk alleles at rs9939609 and rs1421085 will have significant reduction in central body fat from physical activity in contrast to homozygous males of the obesity-risk alleles.The additive effect of these SNPs is found in males with high physical activity only.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Memorial University, St. John's, NL, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore the effect of FTO gene and physical activity interaction on trunk fat percentage.

Design and methods: Subjects are 3,004 individuals from Newfoundland and Labrador whose trunk fat percentage and physical activity were recorded, and who were genotyped for 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FTO gene. Subjects were stratified by gender. Multiple tests and multiple regressions were used to analyze the effects of physical activity, variants of FTO, age, and their interactions on trunk fat percentage. Dietary information and other environmental factors were not considered.

Results: Higher levels of physical activity tend to reduce trunk fat percentage in all individuals. Furthermore, in males, rs9939609 and rs1421085 were significant (α = 0.05) in explaining central body fat, but no SNPs were significant in females. For highly active males, trunk fat percentage varied significantly between variants of rs9939609 and rs1421085, but there is no significant effect among individuals with low activity. The other SNPs examined were not significant in explaining trunk fat percentage.

Conclusions: Homozygous male carriers of non-obesity risk alleles at rs9939609 and rs1421085 will have significant reduction in central body fat from physical activity in contrast to homozygous males of the obesity-risk alleles. The additive effect of these SNPs is found in males with high physical activity only.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The effect of rs9939609 and physical activity interaction, by age. Percent trunk fat is measured in percentage (%), and age is measured in years.
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f4-geg-6-2014-021: The effect of rs9939609 and physical activity interaction, by age. Percent trunk fat is measured in percentage (%), and age is measured in years.

Mentions: Figure 3 shows that for those highly inactive individuals, genotype does not tend to affect trunk fat percentage. However, as physical activity increases, those individuals who are less susceptible to obesity tend to have lower trunk fat percentage than homozygotes of the obesity-risk alleles. To view this interaction effect by age, we modeled the interaction of the categorical physical activity variable with the rs9939609 SNP, adding age as a covariate. Figure 4 summarizes the result of this model, again supporting the previous claim. Genetic heritability creates the greatest variation in trunk fat percentage for active males, and has no significant effect for males with lower amounts of activity, or for females.


Effect of FTO Gene and Physical Activity Interaction on Trunk Fat Percentage Among the Newfoundland Population.

Payne A, Cahill F, Sun G, Loredo-Osti JC, Abarin T - Genet Epigenet (2014)

The effect of rs9939609 and physical activity interaction, by age. Percent trunk fat is measured in percentage (%), and age is measured in years.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4262999&req=5

f4-geg-6-2014-021: The effect of rs9939609 and physical activity interaction, by age. Percent trunk fat is measured in percentage (%), and age is measured in years.
Mentions: Figure 3 shows that for those highly inactive individuals, genotype does not tend to affect trunk fat percentage. However, as physical activity increases, those individuals who are less susceptible to obesity tend to have lower trunk fat percentage than homozygotes of the obesity-risk alleles. To view this interaction effect by age, we modeled the interaction of the categorical physical activity variable with the rs9939609 SNP, adding age as a covariate. Figure 4 summarizes the result of this model, again supporting the previous claim. Genetic heritability creates the greatest variation in trunk fat percentage for active males, and has no significant effect for males with lower amounts of activity, or for females.

Bottom Line: For highly active males, trunk fat percentage varied significantly between variants of rs9939609 and rs1421085, but there is no significant effect among individuals with low activity.Homozygous male carriers of non-obesity risk alleles at rs9939609 and rs1421085 will have significant reduction in central body fat from physical activity in contrast to homozygous males of the obesity-risk alleles.The additive effect of these SNPs is found in males with high physical activity only.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Memorial University, St. John's, NL, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore the effect of FTO gene and physical activity interaction on trunk fat percentage.

Design and methods: Subjects are 3,004 individuals from Newfoundland and Labrador whose trunk fat percentage and physical activity were recorded, and who were genotyped for 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FTO gene. Subjects were stratified by gender. Multiple tests and multiple regressions were used to analyze the effects of physical activity, variants of FTO, age, and their interactions on trunk fat percentage. Dietary information and other environmental factors were not considered.

Results: Higher levels of physical activity tend to reduce trunk fat percentage in all individuals. Furthermore, in males, rs9939609 and rs1421085 were significant (α = 0.05) in explaining central body fat, but no SNPs were significant in females. For highly active males, trunk fat percentage varied significantly between variants of rs9939609 and rs1421085, but there is no significant effect among individuals with low activity. The other SNPs examined were not significant in explaining trunk fat percentage.

Conclusions: Homozygous male carriers of non-obesity risk alleles at rs9939609 and rs1421085 will have significant reduction in central body fat from physical activity in contrast to homozygous males of the obesity-risk alleles. The additive effect of these SNPs is found in males with high physical activity only.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus