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Effect of FTO Gene and Physical Activity Interaction on Trunk Fat Percentage Among the Newfoundland Population.

Payne A, Cahill F, Sun G, Loredo-Osti JC, Abarin T - Genet Epigenet (2014)

Bottom Line: For highly active males, trunk fat percentage varied significantly between variants of rs9939609 and rs1421085, but there is no significant effect among individuals with low activity.Homozygous male carriers of non-obesity risk alleles at rs9939609 and rs1421085 will have significant reduction in central body fat from physical activity in contrast to homozygous males of the obesity-risk alleles.The additive effect of these SNPs is found in males with high physical activity only.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Memorial University, St. John's, NL, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore the effect of FTO gene and physical activity interaction on trunk fat percentage.

Design and methods: Subjects are 3,004 individuals from Newfoundland and Labrador whose trunk fat percentage and physical activity were recorded, and who were genotyped for 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FTO gene. Subjects were stratified by gender. Multiple tests and multiple regressions were used to analyze the effects of physical activity, variants of FTO, age, and their interactions on trunk fat percentage. Dietary information and other environmental factors were not considered.

Results: Higher levels of physical activity tend to reduce trunk fat percentage in all individuals. Furthermore, in males, rs9939609 and rs1421085 were significant (α = 0.05) in explaining central body fat, but no SNPs were significant in females. For highly active males, trunk fat percentage varied significantly between variants of rs9939609 and rs1421085, but there is no significant effect among individuals with low activity. The other SNPs examined were not significant in explaining trunk fat percentage.

Conclusions: Homozygous male carriers of non-obesity risk alleles at rs9939609 and rs1421085 will have significant reduction in central body fat from physical activity in contrast to homozygous males of the obesity-risk alleles. The additive effect of these SNPs is found in males with high physical activity only.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A graph of boxplots showing the distribution of trunk fat percentage for males and females for SNPs rs9939609 and rs1421085. Percent trunk fat is measured in percentage (%).
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f1-geg-6-2014-021: A graph of boxplots showing the distribution of trunk fat percentage for males and females for SNPs rs9939609 and rs1421085. Percent trunk fat is measured in percentage (%).

Mentions: Based on a t-test comparing the trunk fat percentage for both the genders (P = 0) and differences in minor allele frequencies, all models were assessed separately by gender. For each SNP, an additive or dominant model was considered based on the smallest P value from Cochran–Armitage Trend Tests. The results of these tests can be seen in Table 3. Multiple t-tests were performed for each gender comparing the mean trunk fat percentages of different variants in each SNP. The Bartlett test of homogeneity of variance confirmed the assumption of constant variance within variants of each SNP, thus pooled sample variance was used for each test. The results of the multiple t-tests and the P value for each test can be seen in Table 4. Each P value was compared to an adjusted P value using the Benjamini–Hochberg procedure at level 0.05 to determine whether the result was significant, and these outcomes are also displayed in Table 4. There is a strong relationship between both rs9939609 and rs1421085, and trunk fat percentage for males, but a similar relationship is not significant for the other SNPs explored, or for females. Male carriers of rs9939609 risk genotype AA had mean trunk fat percentage that was 4.2 units higher than homozygotes of the common genotype TT (means were different with a P value of 0.0001). This difference was not significant for females. For rs1421085, homozygote males of the risk CC genotype had mean trunk fat percentage that was 3.8 units higher than homozygote TT males (P value of 0.0004), while the difference for females was again not significant. When environmental factors are ignored, genetic variants in these two SNPs have a greater effect on trunk fat percentage for males than for females (see Fig. 1). One study states that the rs17817449 SNP in the FTO gene was related to an increase in BMI,29 but as in this study, the relationship between the FTO gene and BMI existed only in males and postmenopausal females. This result may relate to our study since 77.3% of the females we considered were below the age of 52 years, the average age of menopause suggested by the Canadian Women’s Health Network.30


Effect of FTO Gene and Physical Activity Interaction on Trunk Fat Percentage Among the Newfoundland Population.

Payne A, Cahill F, Sun G, Loredo-Osti JC, Abarin T - Genet Epigenet (2014)

A graph of boxplots showing the distribution of trunk fat percentage for males and females for SNPs rs9939609 and rs1421085. Percent trunk fat is measured in percentage (%).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4262999&req=5

f1-geg-6-2014-021: A graph of boxplots showing the distribution of trunk fat percentage for males and females for SNPs rs9939609 and rs1421085. Percent trunk fat is measured in percentage (%).
Mentions: Based on a t-test comparing the trunk fat percentage for both the genders (P = 0) and differences in minor allele frequencies, all models were assessed separately by gender. For each SNP, an additive or dominant model was considered based on the smallest P value from Cochran–Armitage Trend Tests. The results of these tests can be seen in Table 3. Multiple t-tests were performed for each gender comparing the mean trunk fat percentages of different variants in each SNP. The Bartlett test of homogeneity of variance confirmed the assumption of constant variance within variants of each SNP, thus pooled sample variance was used for each test. The results of the multiple t-tests and the P value for each test can be seen in Table 4. Each P value was compared to an adjusted P value using the Benjamini–Hochberg procedure at level 0.05 to determine whether the result was significant, and these outcomes are also displayed in Table 4. There is a strong relationship between both rs9939609 and rs1421085, and trunk fat percentage for males, but a similar relationship is not significant for the other SNPs explored, or for females. Male carriers of rs9939609 risk genotype AA had mean trunk fat percentage that was 4.2 units higher than homozygotes of the common genotype TT (means were different with a P value of 0.0001). This difference was not significant for females. For rs1421085, homozygote males of the risk CC genotype had mean trunk fat percentage that was 3.8 units higher than homozygote TT males (P value of 0.0004), while the difference for females was again not significant. When environmental factors are ignored, genetic variants in these two SNPs have a greater effect on trunk fat percentage for males than for females (see Fig. 1). One study states that the rs17817449 SNP in the FTO gene was related to an increase in BMI,29 but as in this study, the relationship between the FTO gene and BMI existed only in males and postmenopausal females. This result may relate to our study since 77.3% of the females we considered were below the age of 52 years, the average age of menopause suggested by the Canadian Women’s Health Network.30

Bottom Line: For highly active males, trunk fat percentage varied significantly between variants of rs9939609 and rs1421085, but there is no significant effect among individuals with low activity.Homozygous male carriers of non-obesity risk alleles at rs9939609 and rs1421085 will have significant reduction in central body fat from physical activity in contrast to homozygous males of the obesity-risk alleles.The additive effect of these SNPs is found in males with high physical activity only.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Memorial University, St. John's, NL, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore the effect of FTO gene and physical activity interaction on trunk fat percentage.

Design and methods: Subjects are 3,004 individuals from Newfoundland and Labrador whose trunk fat percentage and physical activity were recorded, and who were genotyped for 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FTO gene. Subjects were stratified by gender. Multiple tests and multiple regressions were used to analyze the effects of physical activity, variants of FTO, age, and their interactions on trunk fat percentage. Dietary information and other environmental factors were not considered.

Results: Higher levels of physical activity tend to reduce trunk fat percentage in all individuals. Furthermore, in males, rs9939609 and rs1421085 were significant (α = 0.05) in explaining central body fat, but no SNPs were significant in females. For highly active males, trunk fat percentage varied significantly between variants of rs9939609 and rs1421085, but there is no significant effect among individuals with low activity. The other SNPs examined were not significant in explaining trunk fat percentage.

Conclusions: Homozygous male carriers of non-obesity risk alleles at rs9939609 and rs1421085 will have significant reduction in central body fat from physical activity in contrast to homozygous males of the obesity-risk alleles. The additive effect of these SNPs is found in males with high physical activity only.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus