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How does the emotive content of televised anti-smoking mass media campaigns influence monthly calls to the NHS Stop Smoking helpline in England?

Richardson S, Langley T, Szatkowski L, Sims M, Gilmore A, McNeill A, Lewis S - Prev Med (2014)

Bottom Line: We used UK government-funded televised tobacco control campaigns from April 2005 to April 2010, categorised as either "positive" (eliciting happiness, satisfaction or hope) or "negative" (eliciting fear, guilt or disgust).We adjusted for seasonal trends, inflation-adjusted weighted average cigarette prices and other tobacco control policies.While positive campaigns were most effective at increasing quitline calls, those with negative emotive content were also found to impact on call rates but only at higher levels of exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Clinical Sciences Building, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham NG5 1PB, United Kingdom. Electronic address: sol.richardson@cantab.net.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Estimated effect of positive and negative emotive GRPs on calls in the same month respectively, with 95% confidence intervals (dashed lines). The y-axis shows the rate ratio for each level of exposure relative to a baseline value of 0 GRPs.
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f0010: Estimated effect of positive and negative emotive GRPs on calls in the same month respectively, with 95% confidence intervals (dashed lines). The y-axis shows the rate ratio for each level of exposure relative to a baseline value of 0 GRPs.

Mentions: However, when these associations were fitted with smooth terms, our models indicated that the effects of exposure to both positive and negative emotive campaigns deviated significantly from linearity, as indicated by EDFs that were significantly different from 1. As shown in Fig. 2, the plots of the smooth terms (generated using the package ggplot2) indicate a dose–response relationship between GRPs for positive emotive campaigns and monthly call rates which accelerated at higher levels of exposure. An increase in exposure to positive emotive campaigns from 0 to 400 GRPs resulted in a significant increase in calls in the same month (rate ratio: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.25–2.01) while an increase from 0 to 600 GRPs resulted in more than a quadrupling in the rate of calls (rate ratio: 4.57, 95% CI: 3.47–6.02). By contrast, negative campaigns only increased calls once per capita exposure exceeded 400 GRPs. An increase from 0 to 400 GRPs resulted in a non-significant increase of 3.3% (rate ratio: 1.03, 95% CI: 0.94–1.14), while an increase from 0 to 600 GRPs was associated with a 60.4% (rate ratio: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.37–1.88) increase in calls.


How does the emotive content of televised anti-smoking mass media campaigns influence monthly calls to the NHS Stop Smoking helpline in England?

Richardson S, Langley T, Szatkowski L, Sims M, Gilmore A, McNeill A, Lewis S - Prev Med (2014)

Estimated effect of positive and negative emotive GRPs on calls in the same month respectively, with 95% confidence intervals (dashed lines). The y-axis shows the rate ratio for each level of exposure relative to a baseline value of 0 GRPs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4262576&req=5

f0010: Estimated effect of positive and negative emotive GRPs on calls in the same month respectively, with 95% confidence intervals (dashed lines). The y-axis shows the rate ratio for each level of exposure relative to a baseline value of 0 GRPs.
Mentions: However, when these associations were fitted with smooth terms, our models indicated that the effects of exposure to both positive and negative emotive campaigns deviated significantly from linearity, as indicated by EDFs that were significantly different from 1. As shown in Fig. 2, the plots of the smooth terms (generated using the package ggplot2) indicate a dose–response relationship between GRPs for positive emotive campaigns and monthly call rates which accelerated at higher levels of exposure. An increase in exposure to positive emotive campaigns from 0 to 400 GRPs resulted in a significant increase in calls in the same month (rate ratio: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.25–2.01) while an increase from 0 to 600 GRPs resulted in more than a quadrupling in the rate of calls (rate ratio: 4.57, 95% CI: 3.47–6.02). By contrast, negative campaigns only increased calls once per capita exposure exceeded 400 GRPs. An increase from 0 to 400 GRPs resulted in a non-significant increase of 3.3% (rate ratio: 1.03, 95% CI: 0.94–1.14), while an increase from 0 to 600 GRPs was associated with a 60.4% (rate ratio: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.37–1.88) increase in calls.

Bottom Line: We used UK government-funded televised tobacco control campaigns from April 2005 to April 2010, categorised as either "positive" (eliciting happiness, satisfaction or hope) or "negative" (eliciting fear, guilt or disgust).We adjusted for seasonal trends, inflation-adjusted weighted average cigarette prices and other tobacco control policies.While positive campaigns were most effective at increasing quitline calls, those with negative emotive content were also found to impact on call rates but only at higher levels of exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies, Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Clinical Sciences Building, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham NG5 1PB, United Kingdom. Electronic address: sol.richardson@cantab.net.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus