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Modeling Wood Encroachment in Abandoned Grasslands in the Eifel National Park - Model Description and Testing.

Hudjetz S, Lennartz G, Krämer K, Roß-Nickoll M, Gergs A, Preuss TG - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Model evaluation revealed that the model is able to emulate successional patterns as observed in the field as well as plausible results for different population densities of red deer.Important neighborhood interactions such as seed dispersal, the protection of seedlings from browsing ungulates by thorny bushes, and the inhibition of wood encroachment by the herbaceous layer, have been successfully reproduced.The advantage of the WoodS-Model is that it integrates these many mutually interacting processes of succession.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Environmental Research (Biology V), RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074, Aachen, Germany; Research Institute for Ecosystem Analysis and Assessment (gaiac) at the RWTH Aachen University, Kackertstr. 10, 52072, Aachen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The degradation of natural and semi-natural landscapes has become a matter of global concern. In Germany, semi-natural grasslands belong to the most species-rich habitat types but have suffered heavily from changes in land use. After abandonment, the course of succession at a specific site is often difficult to predict because many processes interact. In order to support decision making when managing semi-natural grasslands in the Eifel National Park, we built the WoodS-Model (Woodland Succession Model). A multimodeling approach was used to integrate vegetation dynamics in both the herbaceous and shrub/tree layer. The cover of grasses and herbs was simulated in a compartment model, whereas bushes and trees were modelled in an individual-based manner. Both models worked and interacted in a spatially explicit, raster-based landscape. We present here the model description, parameterization and testing. We show highly detailed projections of the succession of a semi-natural grassland including the influence of initial vegetation composition, neighborhood interactions and ungulate browsing. We carefully weighted the single processes against each other and their relevance for landscape development under different scenarios, while explicitly considering specific site conditions. Model evaluation revealed that the model is able to emulate successional patterns as observed in the field as well as plausible results for different population densities of red deer. Important neighborhood interactions such as seed dispersal, the protection of seedlings from browsing ungulates by thorny bushes, and the inhibition of wood encroachment by the herbaceous layer, have been successfully reproduced. Therefore, not only a detailed model but also detailed initialization turned out to be important for spatially explicit projections of a given site. The advantage of the WoodS-Model is that it integrates these many mutually interacting processes of succession.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Wood encroachment on a fallow grassland starting with one parent plant in a 1 ha scenario not influenced by red deer but considering the inhibition of the herbaceous layer.
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pone-0113827-g008: Wood encroachment on a fallow grassland starting with one parent plant in a 1 ha scenario not influenced by red deer but considering the inhibition of the herbaceous layer.

Mentions: Wood encroachment in abandoned grasslands at the Dreiborner Hochfläche is slow [61], [62]. To account for this delay in our model, we considered the inhibition of the input into the seed bank and subsequent germination of seeds by the herbaceous layer. To calibrate the inhibition function, we increased the parameter value until a delayed wood encroachment took place in a fallow of 1 ha ( = 10 cells×10 cells), starting with one mature tree or bush and a value for the parameter I50 as estimated for broom (see above). The resulting simulations are displayed in Fig. 8.


Modeling Wood Encroachment in Abandoned Grasslands in the Eifel National Park - Model Description and Testing.

Hudjetz S, Lennartz G, Krämer K, Roß-Nickoll M, Gergs A, Preuss TG - PLoS ONE (2014)

Wood encroachment on a fallow grassland starting with one parent plant in a 1 ha scenario not influenced by red deer but considering the inhibition of the herbaceous layer.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4262262&req=5

pone-0113827-g008: Wood encroachment on a fallow grassland starting with one parent plant in a 1 ha scenario not influenced by red deer but considering the inhibition of the herbaceous layer.
Mentions: Wood encroachment in abandoned grasslands at the Dreiborner Hochfläche is slow [61], [62]. To account for this delay in our model, we considered the inhibition of the input into the seed bank and subsequent germination of seeds by the herbaceous layer. To calibrate the inhibition function, we increased the parameter value until a delayed wood encroachment took place in a fallow of 1 ha ( = 10 cells×10 cells), starting with one mature tree or bush and a value for the parameter I50 as estimated for broom (see above). The resulting simulations are displayed in Fig. 8.

Bottom Line: Model evaluation revealed that the model is able to emulate successional patterns as observed in the field as well as plausible results for different population densities of red deer.Important neighborhood interactions such as seed dispersal, the protection of seedlings from browsing ungulates by thorny bushes, and the inhibition of wood encroachment by the herbaceous layer, have been successfully reproduced.The advantage of the WoodS-Model is that it integrates these many mutually interacting processes of succession.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Environmental Research (Biology V), RWTH Aachen University, Worringerweg 1, 52074, Aachen, Germany; Research Institute for Ecosystem Analysis and Assessment (gaiac) at the RWTH Aachen University, Kackertstr. 10, 52072, Aachen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The degradation of natural and semi-natural landscapes has become a matter of global concern. In Germany, semi-natural grasslands belong to the most species-rich habitat types but have suffered heavily from changes in land use. After abandonment, the course of succession at a specific site is often difficult to predict because many processes interact. In order to support decision making when managing semi-natural grasslands in the Eifel National Park, we built the WoodS-Model (Woodland Succession Model). A multimodeling approach was used to integrate vegetation dynamics in both the herbaceous and shrub/tree layer. The cover of grasses and herbs was simulated in a compartment model, whereas bushes and trees were modelled in an individual-based manner. Both models worked and interacted in a spatially explicit, raster-based landscape. We present here the model description, parameterization and testing. We show highly detailed projections of the succession of a semi-natural grassland including the influence of initial vegetation composition, neighborhood interactions and ungulate browsing. We carefully weighted the single processes against each other and their relevance for landscape development under different scenarios, while explicitly considering specific site conditions. Model evaluation revealed that the model is able to emulate successional patterns as observed in the field as well as plausible results for different population densities of red deer. Important neighborhood interactions such as seed dispersal, the protection of seedlings from browsing ungulates by thorny bushes, and the inhibition of wood encroachment by the herbaceous layer, have been successfully reproduced. Therefore, not only a detailed model but also detailed initialization turned out to be important for spatially explicit projections of a given site. The advantage of the WoodS-Model is that it integrates these many mutually interacting processes of succession.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus